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Polar regions of the Mesozoic–Paleogene greenhouse world as refugia for relict plant groups
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2186-4970
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster, Germany.
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster, Germany.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3683-4093
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6723-239X
2018 (English)In: Transformative Paleobotany: Papers to Commemorate the Life and Legacy of Thomas N. Taylor / [ed] Krings, M., Harper, C.J., Cúneo, N.R., Rothwell, G.W., Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018, p. 593-611Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Throughout Earth history, plants were apparently less dramatically affected by global biotic crises than animals. Here, we present the unexpected occurrence of Dicroidium, the iconic plant fossil of the Gondwanan Triassic, in Jurassic strata of East Antarctica. The material consists of dispersed cuticles of three Dicroidium species, including the type species D. odontopteroides. These youngest occurrences complement a remarkable biogeographic pattern in the distribution of Dicroidium through time: the earliest records are from palaeoequatorial regions, whereas the last records are from polar latitudes. We summarize similar, relictual high-latitude occurrences in other plant groups, including lycopsids, various ‘seed ferns’, Bennettitales, and cheirolepid conifers, to highlight a common phenomenon: during times of global warmth, the ice-free high-latitude regions acted as refugia for relictual plant taxa that have long disappeared elsewhere. Eventually, such last surviving polar populations probably disappeared as they became outcompeted by newly emerging plant groups in the face of environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018. p. 593-611
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2905DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-813012-4.00024-3ISBN: 9780128130124 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2905DiVA, id: diva2:1257996
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-5234
Note

Additional funding and support from:

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG, Emmy Noether Programme grant BO3131/1-1, research grants KE584/12 andKE584/16

National Science Foundation (project #1636625)

Technical support by the Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Meeres- und Polarfoschung (AWI, Bremerhaven)

Available from: 2019-01-01 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-813012-4.00024-3

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