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First fossil frog from Antarctica: implications for Eocene high latitude climate conditions and Gondwanan cosmopolitanism of Australobatrachia
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2268-5824
Division Paleontologia de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 81900 FWA La Plata, Argentina.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0875-8484
JURASSICA Museum, Route de Fontenais 21, 2900, Porrentruy, Switzerland.
2020 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 5051, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cenozoic ectothermic continental tetrapods (amphibians and reptiles) have not been documented previously from Antarctica, in contrast to all other continents. Here we report a fossil ilium and an ornamented skull bone that can be attributed to the Recent, South American, anuran family Calyptocephalellidae or helmeted frogs, representing the first modern amphibian found in Antarctica.

The two bone fragments were recovered in Eocene, approximately 40 million years old, sediments on Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula. The record of hyperossified calyptocephalellid frogs outside South America supports Gondwanan cosmopolitanism of the anuran clade Australobatrachia. Our results demonstrate that Eocene freshwater ecosystems in Antarctica provided habitats favourable for ectothermic vertebrates (with mean annual precipitation ≥900 mm, coldest month mean temperature ≥3.75 °C, and warmest month mean temperature ≥13.79 °C), at a time when there were at least ephemeral ice sheets existing on the highlands within the interior of the continent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 10, no 5051, p. 1-11
Keywords [en]
Anura, frogs, Eocene, Antarctica, Palaeoclimate
National Category
Natural Sciences Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Ecosystems and species history; Diversity of life
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3858DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-61973-5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3858DiVA, id: diva2:1503794
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-4447Available from: 2020-11-25 Created: 2020-11-25 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61973-5

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