Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Environmental change in the late Permian of Queensland, NE Australia: The warmup to the end-Permian Extinction
Department of Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Beach Hall, 354 Mansfield Road (Unit 1045), Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Department of Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Beach Hall, 354 Mansfield Road (Unit 1045), Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Distillery Field, North Mall, Cork T23 N73K, Ireland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5416-2289
Show others and affiliations
2022 (English)In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 594, p. 110936-110936, article id 110936Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The upper part of the upper Permian succession in the Bowen Basin of Queensland, NE Australia, was investigated to ascertain the timeline and character of environmental changes in this high southern palaeolatitudinal setting leading up to the End-Permian Extinction (EPE). The study focused on (in ascending order) the Peawaddy Formation, Black Alley Shale, and Bandanna Formation, and laterally correlative units. In the western Bowen Basin, the base of the Peawaddy Formation (257 Ma) records the onset of thrust loading and volcanic activity associated with the Hunter-Bowen contractional orogeny. The Peawaddy Formation comprises a series of coarsening-upward, terrigenous clastic intervals interpreted as the product of repeated progradation of deltas into shallow, open marine environments. The overlying Black Alley Shale also comprises multiple deltaic coarsening-upward cycles, which accumulated in stressed, restricted marine environments. The uppermost Bandanna Formation and equivalents formed in extensive coastal plain to estuarine environments. All three formations accumulated under the influence of explosive volcanic activity from the emerging continental volcanicarc to the east of the foreland basin. Volcanism peaked during deposition of the Black Alley Shale around the Wuchiapingian–Changhsingian transition. Abundant dispersed gravel and glendonites (calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite) indicate that the Peawaddy Formation formed under the influence of cold conditions and possible glacial ice (P4 Glaciation; Wuchiapingian Stage). Direct evidence of cold conditions ends at the top of the Peawaddy Formation (254.5 Ma); however, Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) data suggest that surface conditions remained cold through the accumulation of the Black Alley Shale, and the lower Bandanna until c. 253 Ma, before gradually rising through the upper Bandanna Formation. The end of P4 glaciation is also characterized by a major spike in the abundance of marine acritarchs (Micrhystridium evansii Acme Zone), reflecting the development of a regional restricted basin of elevated nutrient concentrations but reduced salinity. In contrast to this short interval of stressed marine conditions, the fossil floras indicate remarkably consistent terrestrial ecosystems throughout the late Lopingian until the EPE. The terrestrial EPE is recorded by adistinctive, laminated mudrock bed (‘Marker Mudstone’) that records a palynological ‘dead zone’ above the uppermost coal seam or equivalent root-penetrated horizon followed by spikes in non-marine algal abundance. Overall, the time interval 257–252 Ma represented by the studied succession does not record a simple monotonic change in palaeoenvironmental conditions, but rather a series of intermittent stepwise changes towards warmer, and more environmentally stressed conditions leading up to the EPE in eastern Australia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2022. Vol. 594, p. 110936-110936, article id 110936
Keywords [en]
Permian, Lopingian, Eastern Australia, Bowen Basin, Palaeoenvironmental change
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-4880DOI: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2022.110936OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-4880DiVA, id: diva2:1714499
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-04061Swedish Research Council, 2018-04527
Note

The research was funded by a collaborative research grant from the US National Science Foundation (EAR-1636625 to C.F.and T.F.). Funding was also received from the Swedish Research Council (VR grant 2019-04061 to V.V., and VR grant 2018-04527 to S.M.).

Available from: 2022-11-29 Created: 2022-11-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(5023 kB)259 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 5023 kBChecksum SHA-512
e4b53709931ba6ba4f29719f2196f5cfe7c3ad42ca6599cbb370e098fdf2741750f4f75fe5322a1038a7a82a443ebc940c887a4220ca15787c1251d6b5338881
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mays, ChrisMcLoughlin, StephenVajda, Vivi
By organisation
Department of Paleobiology
In the same journal
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 259 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 73 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf