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Rise of the Toxic Slime: During the world’s worst mass extinction, bacteria and algaedevastated rivers and lakes—a warning for today
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5416-2289
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2987-5559
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6723-239X
2022 (English)In: Scientific American, ISSN 0036-8733, E-ISSN 1946-7087, Vol. 327, p. 56-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

Life on Earth has experienced some terrifyingly close calls in the past four billion years—cataclysmic events in which the species driven to extinction outnumbered the survivors. The worst crisis occurred 252 million years ago, at the end of the Permian Period. Conditions back then were the bleakest that animals ever faced. Wildfires and drought scoured the land; oceans became intolerably hot and suffocating. Very few creatures could survive in this hellscape. Ultimately more than 70 percent of land species and upward of 80 percent of ocean species went extinct, leading some paleontologists to call this dismal episode the Great Dying.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington D.C.: Springer Nature, 2022. Vol. 327, p. 56-63
Keywords [en]
Glossopteris, Algae, end-Permian extinction, wildfire, erosion, biotic recovery, freshwater ecosystems
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-4890DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0722-56OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-4890DiVA, id: diva2:1714952
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-04527Swedish Research Council, 2019-4061
Note

The authors acknowledge the support of researchgrant EAR-1636625 from the National Science Foundation, and the Swedish Research Council (VR) grants 2018-04527 to SM and 2019-4061 to VV.

Available from: 2022-11-30 Created: 2022-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.scientificamerican.com/article/toxic-slime-contributed-to-earth-rsquo-s-worst-mass-extinction-mdash-and-it-rsquo-s-making-a-comeback/

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