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Anaerobic fungi: a potential source of biological H2 in the oceanic crust.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0206-579
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Stockholm University.
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, no 674, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The recent recognition of fungi in the oceanic igneous crust challenges the understanding of this environment as being exclusively prokaryotic and forces reconsiderations of the ecology of the deep biosphere. Anoxic provinces in the igneous crust are abundant and increase with age and depth of the crust. The presence of anaerobic fungi in deep-sea sediments and on the seafloor introduces a type of organism with attributes of geobiological significance not previously accounted for. Anaerobic fungi are best known from the rumen of herbivores where they produce molecular hydrogen, which in turn stimulates the growth of methanogens. The symbiotic cooperation between anaerobic fungi and methanogens in the rumen enhance the metabolic rate and growth of both. Methanogens and other hydrogen-consuming anaerobic archaea are known from subseafloor basalt; however, the abiotic production of hydrogen is questioned to be sufficient to support such communities. Alternatively, biologically produced hydrogen could serve as a continuous source. Here, we propose anaerobic fungi as a source of bioavailable hydrogen in the oceanic crust, and a close interplay between anaerobic fungi and hydrogen-driven prokaryotes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 7, no 674, 1-8 p.
Keyword [en]
Deep subseafloor biosphere, Endoliths, Basalt, Fungi, Extreme environments
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Evolutionary Biology Ecology Geochemistry Geology
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2004DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2016.00674OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2004DiVA: diva2:1052367
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-3929, 2012-4364, 2013-4290
Available from: 2016-12-06 Created: 2016-12-06 Last updated: 2016-12-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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