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Fungus-like mycelial fossils in 2.4-billion-year-old vesicular basalt.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0206-579
Curtin University.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
Curtin University.
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2017 (English)In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 1, no 6, 1-6 p., 0141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fungi have recently been found to comprise a significant part of the deep biosphere in oceanic sediments and crustal rocks. Fossils occupying fractures and pores in Phanerozoic volcanics indicate that this habitat is at least 400 million years old, but its origin may be considerably older. A 2.4-billion-year-old basalt from the Palaeoproterozoic Ongeluk Formation in South Africa contains filamentous fossils in vesicles and fractures. The filaments form mycelium-like structures growing from a basal film attached to the internal rock surfaces. Filaments branch and anastomose, touch and entangle each other. They are indistinguishable from mycelial fossils found in similar deep-biosphere habitats in the Phanerozoic, where they are attributed to fungi on the basis of chemical and morphological similarities to living fungi. The Ongeluk fossils, however, are two to three times older than current age estimates of the fungal clade. Unless they represent an unknown branch of fungus-like organisms, the fossils imply that the fungal clade is considerably older than previously thought, and that fungal origin and early evolution may lie in the oceanic deep biosphere rather than on land. The Ongeluk discovery suggests that life has inhabited submarine volcanics for more than 2.4 billion years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 1, no 6, 1-6 p., 0141
Keyword [en]
Palaeoproterozoic, deep biosphere, Ongeluk Formation, basalt, microfossil, fungus, South Africa
National Category
Geology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2407DOI: 10.1038/s41559-017-0141OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2407DiVA: diva2:1105288
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-4364, 2013-4290Danish National Research Foundation, DNRF53Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI, 20130185, 20141047
Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2017-06-13Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2017-10-25 12:00
Available from 2017-10-25 12:00

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0141

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