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Chemical microenvironments and single-cell carbon and nitrogen uptake in field-collected colonies of Trichodesmium under different pCO2
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2017 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 11, 1305-1317 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gradients of oxygen (O2) and pH, as well as small-scale fluxes of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and O2 were investigated under different partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in field-collected colonies of the marine dinitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. Microsensor measurements indicated that cells within colonies experienced large fluctuations in O2, pH and CO2concentrations over a day–night cycle. O2 concentrations varied with light intensity and time of day, yet colonies exposed to light were supersaturated with O2 (up to ~200%) throughout the light period and anoxia was not detected. Alternating between light and dark conditions caused a variation in pH levels by on average 0.5 units (equivalent to 15 nmol l−1 proton concentration). Single-cell analyses of C and N assimilation using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS; large geometry SIMS and nanoscale SIMS) revealed high variability in metabolic activity of single cells and trichomes of Trichodesmium, and indicated transfer of C and N to colony-associated non-photosynthetic bacteria. Neither O2 fluxes nor C fixation by Trichodesmium were significantly influenced by short-term incubations under different pCO2 levels, whereas N2fixation increased with increasing pCO2. The large range of metabolic rates observed at the single-cell level may reflect a response by colony-forming microbial populations to highly variable microenvironments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 11, 1305-1317 p.
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecosystems and species history
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URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2537DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2017.15OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2537DiVA: diva2:1162126
Available from: 2017-12-03 Created: 2017-12-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.nature.com/articles/ismej201715

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