Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Cuticle surfaces of fossil plants as a potential proxy for volcanic SO2 emissions: observations from the Triassic-Jurassic transition of East Greenland
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. (Paleobotanik)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7893-1142
School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
2018 (English)In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 49-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flood basalt volcanism has been implicated in several episodes of mass extinctions and environmental degradation in the geological past, including at the Triassic–Jurassic (Tr–J) transition, through global warming caused by massive outgassing of carbon dioxide. However, the patterns of biodiversity loss observed are complicated and sometimes difficult to reconcile with the effects of global warming alone. Recently, attention has turned to additional volcanic products as potential aggravating factors, in particular sulphur dioxide (SO2). SO2 acts both directly as a noxious environmental pollutant and indirectly through forming aerosols in the atmosphere, which may cause transient global dimming and cooling. Here, we present a range of morphological changes to fossil plant leaf cuticle surfaces of hundreds of Ginkgoales and Bennettitales specimens across the Tr–J boundary of East Greenland. Our results indicate that morphological structures of distorted cuticles near the Tr–J boundary are consistent with modern cuticle SO2-caused damage and supported by recent leaf-shape SO2 proxy results, thus identifying cuticle surface morphology as a potentially powerful proxy for SO2. Recording the timing and duration of SO2 emissions in the past may help distinguish between the driving agents responsible for mass extinction events and thus improve our understanding of the Earth System.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2018. Vol. 98, no 1, p. 49-69
Keywords [en]
Fossil plant cuticle, Sulphur dioxide, End-Triassic mass extinction, Camp, Ginkgoales, Bennettitales, SO2 proxy, Flood basalt volcanism, Triassic–Jurassic boundary
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2590DOI: DOI 10.1007/s12549-017-0297-9OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2590DiVA, id: diva2:1163710
Note

Funding from:

EU Marie Curie Excellence Grant (MEXT-CT-2006-042531);

Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University.

Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full texthttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12549-017-0297-9

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Steinthorsdottir, Margret
By organisation
Department of Paleobiology
In the same journal
Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 4 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf