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Structure of insect community in the fungus Inonotus radiatus in riparian boreal forests
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Natural History, ISSN 0022-2933, E-ISSN 1464-5262, Vol. 50, p. 1613-1631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Basidiomes of polypore fungi host many insects. Yet systematic information about insect assemblages from most fungal species is lacking. We studied the insect community associated with the wood-decaying fungus Inonotus radiatus (Sowerby: Fr.) P. Karst. (Hymenochaetales). More specifically, we studied the effect of successional stage and weight of basidiomes, as well as shore exposition (north or south), on species richness and composition, as well as occurrence and abundance of the most abundant fungivores. Basidiomes were collected from riparian forests at five lakes in Sweden. Insects were reared out from the basidiomes in the laboratory. A total of 5645 adult insect individuals of 117 taxa were obtained. Among these, 2782 specimens of 36 taxa use Inonotus radiatus basidiomes as breeding habitat. Eight species of parasitic wasps were new to Sweden. The most abundant fungi- vore was Ennearthron cornutum (Ciidae), which is a generalist breeding in many polypore species. Based on our material and literature, the melandryid beetles Abdera affinis and A. flexuosa seem to be specialists on the order Hymenochaetales. Other fre- quent fungivores were Dorcatoma dresdensis (Ptinidae), and the lepidopterans Archinemapogon yildizae, Nemapogon cloacellus and N. picarellus (Tineidae). The parasitoid community associated with the tineid moths was similar to the community associated with the other polypore species in the order Polyporales. In contrast, the parasitoids associated with Dorcatoma (and/or Abdera) were dif- ferent from the other Polyporales species, suggesting that the fungal host species is more important for these parasitoid species than the beetle host species itself. The most abundant and fre- quent parasitoids were the braconids Diospilus dispar and Colastes fritzeni, which both parasitise Dorcatoma. Species richness was significantly smaller in fresh than in more decayed basidiomes, but species composition did not differ. There was no difference in species composition or richness between north and south shorelines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 50, p. 1613-1631
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Research subject
Diversity of life; Ecosystems and species history
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URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-2628DOI: 10.1080/00222933.2016.1145273OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-2628DiVA, id: diva2:1163886
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved

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