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Bottlenecked but long-lived: high genetic diversity retained in white-tailed eagles upon recovery from population decline.
Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology Centre,.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1654-8762
Department of Evolutionary Biology,.
Department of Evolutionary Biology,.
2006 (English)In: Biology Letters, Vol. 2, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most of the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) populations in Europe experienced dramatic declines during the twentieth century. However, owing to intense conservation actions and the ban of DDT and other persistent pollutants, populations are currently recovering. We show that despite passing through demographic bottlenecks, white-tailed eagle populations have retained significant levels of genetic diversity. Both genetic and ringing data indicate that migration between populations has not been a major factor for the maintenance of genetic variability. We argue that the long generation time of eagles has acted as an intrinsic buffer against loss of genetic diversity, leading to a shorter effective time of the experienced bottleneck. Notably, conservation actions taken in several small sub-populations have ensured the preservation of a larger proportion of the total genetic diversity than if conservation had focused on the population stronghold in Norway. For conservation programmes targeting other endangered, long-lived species, our results highlight the possibility for local retention of high genetic diversity in isolated remnant populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 2, p. 316-319
Keywords [en]
bottleneck;conservation genetics;generation time; microsatellites;mitochondrial DNA;
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Man and the environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3353DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2006.0453OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3353DiVA, id: diva2:1359649
Note

Seven more authors were involved

This work was financially supported by Alvin’s foundation, the Sven and Lilli Lawskifoundation and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation (to F.H.). Hans Ellegren is a Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Research Fellow supported by a grant from Knut and the Alice Wallenberg foundation.

Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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