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Early Carboniferous lignophyte tree diversity in Australia: Woods fromthe Drummond and Yarrol basins, Queensland
AMAP, Univ Montpellier.
AMAP, Univ Montpellier.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6723-239X
AMAP, Univ Montpellier.
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2019 (English)In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, E-ISSN 1879-0615, Vol. 263, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early Carboniferous (Mississippian) permineralized woods from Australia with multiseriate rays have been customarily assigned or compared to the European genus Pitus, despite the absence of information on their primary vascular anatomy. In the context of continuing work on the diversity of Late Devonian andMississippian floras of Gondwana, we studied new silicified woods with secondary xylem similar to that of Pitus (multiseriate rays, araucarioid radial pitting) from two sedimentary basins of Queensland, Australia. In the Drummond Basin, three morphotypes of wood of Viséan age can be distinguished based on ray size in tangential section. Although this variation is similar to that observed between the various European species of Pitus, information on the primary vascular anatomy of the trees provided by three incomplete specimens excludes an affinity with Pitus for at least two taxa. In the Yarrol Basin, two well-preserved late Viséan trunks also have characters similar to Pitus but can be distinguished from that genus and other previously described Mississippian trees, in particular by the anatomy of their primary vascular system and departing leaf traces. They are assigned to a new genus, Ninsaria. Collectively, the new specimens from Queensland show that wood traditionally referred to “Pitus” from Australia actually belongs to several other types of trees that are not known from Europe or North America, indicating probable floristic provincialism between the Northern and Southern hemisphere floras at this time. These new fossils corroborate the existence of a global Mississippian diversification of (pro)gymnosperm trees already noted in Laurussia. They also indicate that the Mississippian floras of Australia were more diverse and complex than traditionally inferred.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 263, p. 47-64
Keywords [en]
Fossil wood, Progymnosperms, Gymnosperms, Tournaisian, Viséan, Eastern Australia
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
The changing Earth; Ecosystems and species history
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-3426DOI: 10.1016/j.revpalbo.2019.01.009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-3426DiVA, id: diva2:1372958
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-5234
Note

Additional funding from: National Science Foundation (project #1636625);

ALD and BMB acknowledge funding from LabEx CeMEB, France (Exploratory Project MARCON)

Available from: 2019-11-01 Created: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.revpalbo.2019.01.009

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