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Evolution of the ovenbird-woodcreeper assemblage(Aves: Furnariidae) - major shifts in nest architecture and adaptive radiation
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 37, no 3, 260-272 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Neotropical ovenbirds (Furnariidae) form an extraordinary morphologically and ecologically diverse passerine radiation, which includes many examples of species that are superficially similar to other passerine birds as a resulting from their adaptations to similar lifestyles. The ovenbirds further exhibits a truly remarkable variation in nest types, arguably approaching that found in the entire passerine clade. Herein we present a genus-level phylogeny of ovenbirds based on both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA including a more complete taxon sampling than in previous molecular studies of the group. The phylogenetic results are in good agreement with earlier molecular studies of ovenbirds, and supports the suggestion that Geositta and Sclerurus form the sister clade to both core-ovenbirds and woodcreepers. Within the core-ovenbirds several relationships that are incongruent with traditional classifications are suggested. Among other things, the philydorine ovenbirds are found to be non-monophyletic. The mapping of principal nesting strategies onto the molecular phylogeny suggests cavity nesting to be plesiomorphic within the ovenbird–woodcreeper radiation. It is also suggested that the shift from cavity nesting to building vegetative nests is likely to have happened at least three times during the evolution of the group. We suggest that the shifts in nest architecture within the furnariine and synallaxine ovenbirds have served as an ecological release that has facilitated diversification into new habitats and new morphological specializations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 37, no 3, 260-272 p.
National Category
Biological Systematics Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Diversity of life
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-544DOI: 10.1111/j.2006.0908-8857.03612.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-544DiVA: diva2:735016
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2004-2913
Available from: 2014-07-22 Created: 2014-07-22 Last updated: 2014-07-22Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.2006.0908-8857.03612.x/abstract

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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