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Evolution, biogeography, and patterns of diversification in passerine birds
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
2003 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 34, no 1, 3-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper summarizes and discusses the many new insights into passerine evolution gained from an increased general interest in avian evolution among biologists, and particularly from the extensive use of DNA sequence data in phylogenetic reconstruction. The sister group relationship between the New Zealand rifleman and all other passerines, indicates the importance of the former southern supercontinent Gondwana in the earliest evolution of this group. Following the break-up of Gondwana, the ancestors of other major passerine groups became isolated in Australia (oscines), South America (New World suboscines), and possibly, the then connected Kerguelen Plateau/India/Madagascar tectonic plates (Old World suboscines). The oscines underwent a significant radiation in the Australo-Papuan region and only a few oscine lineages have spread further than to the nearby Southeast Asia. A remarkable exception is the ancestor to the vast Passerida radiation, which now comprises 35% of all bird species. This group obviously benefitted greatly from the increased diversity in plant seed size and morphology during the Tertiary. The lyrebirds (and possibly scrub-birds) constitute the sister group to all other oscines, which renders “Corvida” (sensu Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) paraphyletic. Sequence data suggests that Passerida, the other clade of oscines postulated based on the results of DNA–DNA hybridizations, is monophyletic, and that the rockfowl and rock-jumpers are the most basal members of this clade. The suboscines in the Old World (Eurylamides) and the New World (Tyrannides), respectively, are sister groups. A provisional, working classification of the passerines is presented based on the increased understanding of the major patterns of passerine evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 34, no 1, 3-15 p.
National Category
Biological Systematics Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Diversity of life
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-547DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-048X.2003.03121.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-547DiVA: diva2:735022
Funder
Swedish Research Council, B-AA/BU 01913-304Swedish Research Council, 621-2001-2773
Available from: 2014-07-22 Created: 2014-07-22 Last updated: 2014-07-22Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1034/j.1600-048X.2003.03121.x/abstract

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