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Molecular data reveal some major adaptational shifts in the early evolution of the most diverse avian family, the Furnariidae
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
2005 (English)In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 146, no 1, 1-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A robust phylogeny estimate for the family Furnariidae (sensu lato) was obtained using sequences of two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene (cyt b). Contrary to the widely accepted sister-group relationship of ovenbirds (Furnariinae) and woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae), a basal clade is suggested for Sclerurus and Geositta, while Xenops, hitherto considered an aberrant ovenbird, was found to occupy a basal position on the woodcreeper lineage. The morphological variation is re-interpreted in view of this revised phylogenetic hypothesis. Presumably, the remarkable adaptive radiation in this family started as primitive, Sclerurus-likes forms, which used the tail as a prop during terrestrial feeding, lured up to seek food on tree-trunks. The two basal woodcreeper genera, Xenops and then Glyphorynchus, show strong cranial specializations for hammering in wood, thus presenting a remarkable parallelism with the family Picidae, Xenops resembling a piculet, Glyphorynchus, a diminutive woodpecker. However, this specialization was lost in other woodcreepers, which show a more normal passerine skull, adapted for probing and prying in tree-trunk crevices and sallying for escaping insects. The ovenbirds developed a more flexible (rhynchokinetic) bill, well suited for probing and retrieving hidden prey in dead-leaf clusters and debris suspended in the vegetation, and in epiphyte masses. Adaptations to live in open terrain are secondary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 146, no 1, 1-13 p.
Keyword [en]
Adaptative shifts, Bayesian analysis, Dendrocolaptinae, Furnariinae, Nuclear introns
National Category
Biological Systematics Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Diversity of life
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:nrm:diva-551DOI: 10.1007/s10336-004-0054-5OAI: oai:DiVA.org:nrm-551DiVA: diva2:735035
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621–2001–2773
Available from: 2014-07-22 Created: 2014-07-22 Last updated: 2014-07-22Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10336-004-0054-5

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Irestedt, MartinEricson, Per G P

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