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  • 1. Aberer, André
    et al.
    Stamatakis, Alexis
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    An efficient independence sampler for updating branches in Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of phylogenetic trees2016In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 161-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Abu El-Enen, M.M.
    et al.
    Abu-Alam, T.S.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ali, K.A.
    Okrusch, M.
    P–T path and timing of crustal thickening during amalgamation of East and West Gondwana: A case study from the Hafafit Metamorphic Complex, Eastern Desert of Egypt.2016In: Lithos, ISSN 0024-4937, E-ISSN 1872-6143, Vol. 263, p. 213-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The southeastern sector of the Hafafit Metamorphic Complex, southern Eastern Desert of Egypt comprises infrastructural orthogneisses of tonalite and syenogranite parentage, amphibolites, and a volcano-sedimentary association. These are overthrust by an obducted suprastructural ophiolite nappes via the Nugrus thrust. The protolith of the biotite–hornblende-gneisses was formed during island-arc accretion, while that of the garnet–biotite gneisses were formed in a within-plate regime, consistent with a transition to a post-collisional setting. The volcano-sedimentary association comprises interbedded and intercalated highly foliated metapelitic schists, metabasites, and leucocratic gneisses, deposited in a back-arc basin. The metapelites and the leucocratic gneisses originated from immature Fe-shales and arkoses derived from intermediate-mafic and acidic igneous rocks, respectively, via weak chemical weathering in a tectonically active island arc terrane. The intercalated amphibolites were derived from tholeiitic basalts generated in a back-arc setting.

    The volcano-sedimentary association was metamorphosed under upper-amphibolite facies conditions with pressures of 9–13 kbar and temperatures of 570–675 °C, as derived from conventional geothermobarometry and pseudosection calculation. A steep, tight clockwise P–T path is constrained and a geothermal gradient around 20 °C/km is estimated for the peak metamorphism. We assume that deformation and metamorphism are due to crustal thickening during the collision of East and West Gondwana, where peak metamorphism took place in the middle to lower crust at 33 km average crustal depth. This was followed by a subsequent quasi-isothermal decompression due to rapid exhumation during wrench tectonics. Sinistral transcurrent shearing with extensional denudation resulted in vertical ductile thinning that was accompanied by heat input from magmatism, as indicated by a higher geothermal gradient during retrograde metamorphism and exhumation of the complex.

    U–Pb data from magmatic zircons yields protolith ages of 731 ± 3 Ma for the biotite–hornblende gneisses and 646 ± 12 Ma for the garnet–biotite gneisses. Conforming to field evidence, our geochronology data point to a depositional age of the volcano-sedimentary cover at around 650 Ma. The age of metamorphism is constrained by a low Th/U ratio of a zircon grain crystallized at an age of 597 ± 6 Ma.

  • 3.
    ACOSTA HOSPITALECHE, Carolina
    et al.
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata, Argentina.
    HAGSTRÖM, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata and Instituto Antártico Argentino (Dirección Nacional del Antártico), 25 de mayo 1143, San Martín, Argentina.
    Historical perspective of Otto Nordenskjöld´s Antarctic fossil penguin collection and Carl Wiman’s contribution2017In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 364-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early explorer and scientist Otto Nordenskjöld, leader of the Swedish South Polar Expedition of 1901–1903, was the first to collect Antarctic penguin fossils. The site is situated in the northeastern region of Seymour Island and constitutes one of the most important localities in the study of fossilised penguins. The task of describing these specimens together with fossilised whale remains was given to Professor Carl Wiman (1867–1944) at Uppsala University, Sweden. Although the paradigm for the systematic study of penguins has changed considerably over recent years, Wiman's contributions are still remarkable. His establishment of grouping by size as a basis for classification was a novel approach that allowed them to deal with an unexpectedly high morphological diversity and limited knowledge of penguin skeletal anatomy. In the past, it was useful to provide a basic framework for the group that today could be used as ‘taxon free’ categories. First, it was important to define new species, and then to establish a classification based on size and robustness. This laid the foundation for the first attempts to use morphometric parameters for the classification of isolated penguin bones. The Nordenskjöld materials constitute an invaluable collection for comparative purposes, and every year researchers from different countries visit this collection.

  • 4. Adam, B.
    et al.
    Klawonn, I.
    Svedén, J.
    Bergkvist, J.
    Nahar, N.
    Walve, J.
    Littmann, S.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lavik, G.
    Kuypers, M.M.M.
    Ploug, H.
    N2-fixation, ammonium release, and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community.2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 19, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with 15N2, Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong 15N-enrichment implying substantial 15N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of 15NH4+ from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4+ fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (<250 nm) as compared with N2-fixation within colonies. No N2-fixation was detected in autotrophic microorganisms <5 μm, which relied on NH4+ uptake from the surrounding water. Aphanizomenon released about 50% of its newly fixed N2 as NH4+. However, NH4+ did not accumulate in the water but was transferred to heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms as well as to diatoms (Chaetoceros sp.) and copepods with a turnover time of ~5 h. We provide direct quantitative evidence that colony-forming Aphanizomenon releases about half of its recently fixed N2 as NH4+, which is transferred to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  • 5. Adrian, Brent
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Grossman, Aryeh
    New Miocene Carnivora (Mammalia) from Moruorot and Kalodirr, Kenya2018In: Palaeontologia Electronica, ISSN 1935-3952, E-ISSN 1094-8074, Vol. 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     We describe new carnivoran fossils from Kalodirr and Moruorot, two late Early

    Miocene sites in the Lothidok Formation of West Turkana, Kenya. The fossils include a

    new species of viverrid, Kichechia savagei  sp. nov., a new genus and species of felid,

    Katifelis nightingalei  gen. et sp. nov., and an unidentified musteloid. We also report

    new records of the amphicyonid Cynelos macrodon. These new fossils increase the

    known diversity of African Early Miocene carnivorans and highlight regional differences

    in Africa.

  • 6. Agangi, Andrea
    et al.
    Reddy, S M
    Plavsa, D
    Vieru, C
    Selvaraja, V
    LaFlamme, C
    Jeon, Heejin
    Martin, L
    Nozaki, T
    Takaya, Y
    Suzuki, K
    Subsurface deposition of Cu-rich massive sulphide underneath a Palaeoproterozoic seafloor hydrothermal system—the Red Bore prospect, Western Australia2018In: Mineralium Deposita, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Agustí, J.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Influence of climate on faunal evolution in the Quaternary of Europe1995Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8. Ahti, Teuvo
    et al.
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Schultz, Matthias
    Tehler, Anders
    Fryday, Alan M
    First supplement to the lichen checklist of South Africa2016In: Bothalia, African Biodiversity & Conservation Journal, Vol. 46, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Alerstam, Thomas
    et al.
    Rosén, Mikael
    Bäckman, Johan
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Hellgren, Olof
    Flight speeds among bird species: allometric and phylogenetic effects.2007In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 5, no 8, p. e197-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight speed is expected to increase with mass and wing loading among flying animals and aircraft for fundamental aerodynamic reasons. Assuming geometrical and dynamical similarity, cruising flight speed is predicted to vary as (body mass)(1/6) and (wing loading)(1/2) among bird species. To test these scaling rules and the general importance of mass and wing loading for bird flight speeds, we used tracking radar to measure flapping flight speeds of individuals or flocks of migrating birds visually identified to species as well as their altitude and winds at the altitudes where the birds were flying. Equivalent airspeeds (airspeeds corrected to sea level air density, Ue) of 138 species, ranging 0.01-10 kg in mass, were analysed in relation to biometry and phylogeny. Scaling exponents in relation to mass and wing loading were significantly smaller than predicted (about 0.12 and 0.32, respectively, with similar results for analyses based on species and independent phylogenetic contrasts). These low scaling exponents may be the result of evolutionary restrictions on bird flight-speed range, counteracting too slow flight speeds among species with low wing loading and too fast speeds among species with high wing loading. This compression of speed range is partly attained through geometric differences, with aspect ratio showing a positive relationship with body mass and wing loading, but additional factors are required to fully explain the small scaling exponent of Ue in relation to wing loading. Furthermore, mass and wing loading accounted for only a limited proportion of the variation in Ue. Phylogeny was a powerful factor, in combination with wing loading, to account for the variation in Ue. These results demonstrate that functional flight adaptations and constraints associated with different evolutionary lineages have an important influence on cruising flapping flight speed that goes beyond the general aerodynamic scaling effects of mass and wing loading.

  • 10.
    Alexander, Louise
    et al.
    Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom.
    Snape, Joshua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Joy, Katherine
    University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Downes, Hilary
    Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom.
    Crawford, Ian
    Birkbeck College, University of London, United Kingdom.
    An analysis of Apollo lunar soil samples 12070,889, 12030,187, and 12070,891: Basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site and implications for classification of small-sized lunar samples2016In: Meteoritics and Planetary Science, ISSN 1086-9379, E-ISSN 1945-5100, Vol. 51, p. 1654-1677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lunar mare basalts provide insights into the compositional diversity of the Moon's interior. Basalt fragments from the lunar regolith can potentially sample lava flows from regions of the Moon not previously visited, thus, increasing our understanding of lunar geological evolution. As part of a study of basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site, detailed petrological and geochemical data are provided here for 13 basaltic chips. In addition to bulk chemistry, we have analyzed the major, minor, and trace element chemistry of mineral phases which highlight differences between basalt groups. Where samples contain olivine, the equilibrium parent melt magnesium number (Mg#; atomic Mg/[Mg + Fe]) can be calculated to estimate parent melt composition. Ilmenite and plagioclase chemistry can also determine differences between basalt groups. We conclude that samples of approximately 1–2 mm in size can be categorized provided that appropriate mineral phases (olivine, plagioclase, and ilmenite) are present. Where samples are fine-grained (grain size <0.3 mm), a “paired samples t-test” can provide a statistical comparison between a particular sample and known lunar basalts. Of the fragments analyzed here, three are found to belong to each of the previously identified olivine and ilmenite basalt suites, four to the pigeonite basalt suite, one is an olivine cumulate, and two could not be categorized because of their coarse grain sizes and lack of appropriate mineral phases. Our approach introduces methods that can be used to investigate small sample sizes (i.e., fines) from future sample return missions to investigate lava flow diversity and petrological significance.

  • 11. Ali, K.A.
    et al.
    Surour, A.A:
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andresen, A.
    Single zircon Hf-O isotope constraints on the origin of A-type granites from the Jabal Al-Hassir ring complex, Saudi Arabia.2015In: Precambrian Research, ISSN 0301-9268, E-ISSN 1872-7433, Vol. 256, p. 131-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Jabal Al-Hassir ring complex in the southern Arabian Shield is an alkaline granite complex comprising an inner core of biotite granite that outwardly becomes a porphyritic sodic-calcic amphibole (ferrobarroisite–katophorite) granite. A combined study of mineral chemistry and single zircon Hf–O zircon isotope analyses was carried out to infer the magma sources of the Neoproterozoic post-collisional A-type granitoids in Saudi Arabia. The granitic rocks show high positive initial ɛHf(t) values of +7.0 to +10.3 and δ18O values of +5.8‰ to +7.4‰ that are consistent with melting of a juvenile crustal protolith that was formed during the Neoproterozoic assembly of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Crustal-model ages (Hf-tNC) of 0.71–0.94 Ga indicate minor contribution from an older continental crust in the formation of the Jabal Al-Hassir granitic rocks (crystallization age = 620 ±3 Ma), but any such component is likely to be Neoproterozoic in age. Temperature and oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) estimates suggested that the Jabal Al-Hassir A-type granite magma was generated at high temperature (820–1050 °C) and low ƒO2. Geochemical characteristics (e.g., low ƒO2), geochronological data, and Hf and O isotope compositions, indicate that the magmas of the Neoproterozoic A-type granites of the Jabal Al-Hassir ring complex were likely generated by crustal partial melting of a juvenile Neoproterozoic lower crustal tholeiitic rocks, following collision between East and West Gondwana in the final stages of the evolution of the Arabian Shield.

  • 12. Ali, Kamal A
    et al.
    Jeon, Heejin
    Andresen, Arild
    Li, Shuang-Qing
    Harbi, Hesham M
    Hegner, Ernst
    U–Pb zircon geochronology and Nd–Hf–O isotopic systematics of the Neoproterozoic Hadb adh Dayheen ring complex, Central Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia2014In: Lithos, Vol. 206, p. 348-360Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Foerschler, Marc I.
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Erratum to: Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae) (vol 65, pg 35, 2012)2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 1017-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Förschler, Marc I
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae).2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open-habitat chats (genera Myrmecocichla, Cercomela, Oenanthe and relative) are a morphologically and ecologically cohesive group of genera with unclear phylogenetic relationships. They are distributed mostly in open, arid and/or rocky habitats of Africa and Eurasia. Here, we present the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of this group to date, with a complete taxon sampling at the species level. The analysis, based on a multilocus dataset including three mitochondrial and three nuclear loci, allows us to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships and test the traditional generic limits. All genera are non-monophyletic, suggesting extensive convergence on similar plumage patterns in unrelated species. While the colour pattern appear to be a poor predictor of the phylogenetic relationships, some of the ecological and behavioural traits agree relatively well with the major clades. Following our results, we also propose a revised generic classification for the whole group.

  • 15. Alonso, Marta
    et al.
    Jiménez, Juan A.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cano, Maria J.
    Disentangling generic limits in Chionoloma, Oxystegus, Pachyneuropsis and Pseudosymblepharis (Bryophyta: Pottiaceae): An inquiry into their phylogenetic relationships2016In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 65, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Alroy, John
    et al.
    Bernor, R. L.
    Fortelius, Mikael
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The MN System: regional or continental?1998In: Mitteilungen der Bayerischen Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und historische Geologie, Vol. 38, p. 243-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Olsson, Urban
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sundberg, Per
    Morphological, vocal and genetic divergence in the Cettia acanthizoides complex (Aves: Cettiidae)2007In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 149, no 3, p. 437-452Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Sundberg, Per
    Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea.2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 381-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sylvioidea is one of the three superfamilies recognized within the largest avian radiation, the parvorder Passerida. In the present study, which is the first taxon-dense analysis of the Sylvioidea based on sequence data (nuclear myoglobin intron II and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene), we investigate the interrelationships among the four "sylvioid" clades found by previous workers, as well as the relationships within the largest of these clades. The nuclear and mitochondrial loci estimate basically the same phylogeny, with minor differences in resolution. The trees based on myoglobin and the combined data identify a strongly supported clade that includes the taxa previously allocated to Sylvioidea, except for Sitta (nuthatches), Certhia (treecreepers), Parus (tits), Remiz (penduline tits), Troglodytes and Campylorhynchus (wrens), Polioptila (gnatcatchers), and Regulus (crests/kinglets); this clade also comprises larks, which have previously been placed in the superfamily Passeroidea. We refer to this clade as Sylvioidea. This clade is further divided into 10 main, well-supported clades, which we suggest form the basis for a revised classification.

  • 19. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Fregin, Silke
    Norman, Janette A
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Olsson, Urban
    Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae.2011In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 513-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of most of the species in the avian passerine family Locustellidae is inferred using a Bayesian species tree approach (Bayesian Estimation of Species Trees, BEST), as well as a traditional Bayesian gene tree method (MrBayes), based on a dataset comprising one mitochondrial and four nuclear loci. The trees inferred by the different methods agree fairly well in topology, although in a few cases there are marked differences. Some of these discrepancies might be due to convergence problems for BEST (despite up to 1×10(9) iterations). The phylogeny strongly disagrees with the current taxonomy at the generic level, and we propose a revised classification that recognizes four instead of seven genera. These results emphasize the well known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on non-cladistic evaluations of morphological characters. An analysis of an extended mitochondrial dataset with multiple individuals from most species, including many subspecies, suggest that several taxa presently treated as subspecies or as monotypic species as well as a few taxa recognized as separate species are in need of further taxonomic work.

  • 20. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Höhna, Sebastian
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset.2011In: BMC evolutionary biology, ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11, p. 352-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The avian family Cettiidae, including the genera Cettia, Urosphena, Tesia, Abroscopus and Tickellia and Orthotomus cucullatus, has recently been proposed based on analysis of a small number of loci and species. The close relationship of most of these taxa was unexpected, and called for a comprehensive study based on multiple loci and dense taxon sampling. In the present study, we infer the relationships of all except one of the species in this family using one mitochondrial and three nuclear loci. We use traditional gene tree methods (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood bootstrapping, parsimony bootstrapping), as well as a recently developed Bayesian species tree approach (*BEAST) that accounts for lineage sorting processes that might produce discordance between gene trees. We also analyse mitochondrial DNA for a larger sample, comprising multiple individuals and a large number of subspecies of polytypic species.

    RESULTS: There are many topological incongruences among the single-locus trees, although none of these is strongly supported. The multi-locus tree inferred using concatenated sequences and the species tree agree well with each other, and are overall well resolved and well supported by the data. The main discrepancy between these trees concerns the most basal split. Both methods infer the genus Cettia to be highly non-monophyletic, as it is scattered across the entire family tree. Deep intraspecific divergences are revealed, and one or two species and one subspecies are inferred to be non-monophyletic (differences between methods).

    CONCLUSIONS: The molecular phylogeny presented here is strongly inconsistent with the traditional, morphology-based classification. The remarkably high degree of non-monophyly in the genus Cettia is likely to be one of the most extraordinary examples of misconceived relationships in an avian genus. The phylogeny suggests instances of parallel evolution, as well as highly unequal rates of morphological divergence in different lineages. This complex morphological evolution apparently misled earlier taxonomists. These results underscore the well-known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on overall morphological similarity. Based on the molecular data, a revised taxonomy is proposed. Although the traditional and species tree methods inferred much the same tree in the present study, the assumption by species tree methods that all species are monophyletic is a limitation in these methods, as some currently recognized species might have more complex histories.

  • 21. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Jønsson, Knud A.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ödeen, Anders
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015In: Royal Society Open Science, ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, article id 140364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

  • 22. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Zhang, R
    Zhao, M
    Wang, J
    Zhu, X
    Gwee, C.H.
    Hao, Y
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jia, C
    Prawiradilaga, D M
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Lei, Fumin
    Olsson, Urban
    Complete species-level phylogeny of the leaf warbler (Aves: Phylloscopidae) radiation2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 126, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Alvarez, Belinda
    et al.
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Clymans, Wim
    Fontorbe, Guillaume
    Conley, Daniel
    Assessing the Potential of Sponges (Porifera) as Indicators of Ocean Dissolved Si Concentrations2017In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 4, no 373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the distribution of sponges along dissolved silica (dSi) concentration gradients to test whether sponge assemblages are related to dSi and to assess the validity of fossil sponges as a palaeoecological tool for inferring dSi concentrations of the past oceans. We extracted sponge records from the publically available Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) database and linked these records with ocean physiochemical data to evaluate if there is any correspondence between dSi concentrations of the waters sponges inhabit and their distribution. Over 320,000 records of Porifera were available, of which 62,360 met strict quality control criteria. Our analyses was limited to the taxonomic levels of family, order and class. Because dSi concentration is correlated with depth in the modern ocean, we also explored sponge taxa distributions as a function of depth. We observe that while some sponge taxa appear to have dSi preferences (e.g., class Hexactinellida occurs mostly at high dSi), the overall distribution of sponge orders and families along dSi gradients is not sufficiently differentiated to unambiguously relate dSi concentrations to sponge taxa assemblages. We also observe that sponge taxa tend to be similarly distributed along a depth gradient. In other words, both dSi and/or another variable that depth is a surrogate for, may play a role in controlling sponge spatial distribution and the challenge is to distinguish between the two. We conclude that inferences about palaeo-dSi concentrations drawn from the abundance of sponges in the stratigraphic records must be treated cautiously as these animals are adapted to a great range of dSi conditions and likely other underlying variables that are related to depth. Our analysis provides a quantification of the dSi ranges of common sponge taxa, expands on previous knowledge related to their bathymetry preferences and suggest that sponge taxa assemblages are not related to particular dSi conditions. 

  • 24. Alves-Araújo, Anderson
    et al.
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Alves, Marccus
    A taxonomic survey of Pouteria (Sapotaceae) from the northern portion of the Atlantic rainforest of Brazil2014In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 915-938Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Anand, Rajagopal
    et al.
    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Mezger, Klaus
    Neoarchean crustal growth by accretionary processes: Evidence from combined zircon–titanite U–Pb isotope studies on granitoid rocks around the Hutti greenstone belt, eastern Dharwar Craton, India2014In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 79, p. 72-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neoarchean Hutti greenstone belt hosts mesothermal gold deposits and is surrounded by granitoid rocks on all sides. Combined U–Pb dating of zircon and titanite from the granitoid rocks constrains their emplacement history and subsequent geologic evolution. The Golapalli and Yelagatti granodiorites occurring to the north of the Hutti greenstone belt were emplaced at 2569 ± 17 Ma. The Yelagatti granodiorite yielded a younger titanite age of 2530 ± 6 Ma which indicates that it was affected by a post-crystallization thermal event that exceeded the titanite closure temperature. The western granodiorites from Kardikal have identical titanite and zircon ages of 2557 ± 6 Ma and 2559 ± 19 Ma, respectively. The eastern Kavital granodiorites yielded titanite ages of 2547 ± 6 Ma and 2544 ± 24 Ma which are identical to the published U–Pb zircon SHRIMP ages. These ages imply that the granitoid rocks surrounding the Hutti greenstone belt were formed as discrete batholiths within a short span of ca. 40 Ma between 2570 Ma and 2530 Ma ago. They were juxtaposed by horizontal tectonic forces against the supracrustal rocks that had formed in oceanic settings at the end of the Archean. The first phase of gold mineralization coincided with the last phase of granodiorite intrusion in the Hutti area. A metamorphic overprint occurred at ca. 2300 Ma ago that reset the Rb–Sr isotope system in biotites and possibly caused hydrothermal activity and enrichment of Au in the ore lodes. The eastern Dharwar Craton consists of quartz monzodiorite–granodiorite–granite suites of rocks that are younger than the greenstone belts that are older than ~2650 Ma reported from earlier studies. The granitoid magmatism took place between 2650 and 2510 Ma ago indicating accretionary growth of the eastern Dharwar Craton.

  • 26.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Proposal to conserve the name Adelostigma (Asteraceae: Inuleae)with a conserved type2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 387-388Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Hansen, Lars Ove
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sagvolden, Björn
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Buskerud, South Norway1993In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 40, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Hansen, Lars Ove
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Solhöy, Torstein
    Söli, Geir
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Aust-Agder and Vest-Agder, South Norway1990In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 37, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from a mountain rain forest in NE Tanzania1993In: Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from a mountain rain forest in NE Tanzania / [ed] Otto, The Hague: Junk , 1993, p. 59-64Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Andersen, Trond
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kobro, Sverre
    Ligaard, S
    Faunistical records of Caddis flies (Trichoptera) from Østfold and Akershus, SE Norway1993In: Fauna norvegica Serie B, Vol. 40, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Anderson, Heidi
    et al.
    Dorrigo, NSW, Australia.
    David J. Batten, David
    Manchester University.
    Cantrill, David
    National Herbarium of Victoria, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne.
    Cleal, Christopher
    Museum of Wales.
    Susanne Feist-Burkhardt, Susanne
    SFB Geological Consulting & Services, Odenwaldstrasse 18, D-64372 Ober-Ramstadt, Germany.
    Fensome, Robert
    Natural Resources Canada.
    Head, Martin
    Brock University, Canada.
    Herendeen, Patrick
    Chicago Botanuic Garden.
    Jaramillo, Carlos
    Smithsonian Institution.
    Kvaček, Jiří
    Czech National Museum, Prague.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Skog, Judith
    George Mason University.
    Takahashi, Masamichi
    Niigata University.
    Wicander, Reed
    Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Central Michigan University .
    (087–090) Proposal to treat the use of a hyphen in the name of a fossil-genus as an orthographical error2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose modifications to the Code such that use of a hyphen in the name of a fossil-genus is treated as an error to be corrected by deletion of the hyphen. This will circumvent the need to conserve the numerous de-hyphenated names against unused hyphenated forms. We propose changes to Art. 60 of the Code to allow this correction, and the addition of a phrase in Art. 20 to add clarity to the naming of fossil-genera.

  • 32. Andersson, Ki
    et al.
    Norman, David
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sabertoothed carnivores and the killing of large prey2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 10, p. e24971-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sabre-like canines clearly have the potential to inflict grievous wounds leading to massive blood loss and rapid death. Hypotheses concerning sabretooth killing modes include attack to soft parts such as the belly or throat, where biting deep is essential to generate strikes reaching major blood vessels. Sabretoothed carnivorans are widely interpreted as hunters of larger and more powerful prey than that of their present-day nonsabretoothed relatives. However, the precise functional advantage of the sabretooth bite, particularly in relation to prey size, is unknown. Here, we present a new point-to-point bite model and show that, for sabretooths, depth of the killing bite decreases dramatically with increasing prey size. The extended gape of sabretooths only results in considerable increase in bite depth when biting into prey with a radius of less than ~10 cm. For sabretooths, this size-reversed functional advantage suggests predation on species within a similar size range to those attacked by present-day carnivorans, rather than “megaherbivores” as previously believed. The development of the sabretooth condition appears to represent a shift in function and killing behaviour, rather than one in predator-prey relations. Furthermore, our results demonstrate how sabretoothed carnivorans are likely to have evolved along a functionally continuous trajectory: beginning as an extension of a jaw-powered killing bite, as adopted by present-day pantherine cats, followed by neck-powered biting and thereafter shifting to neck-powered shear-biting. We anticipate this new insight to be a starting point for detailed study of the evolution of pathways that encompass extreme specialisation, for example, understanding how neck-powered biting shifts into shear-biting and its significance for predator-prey interactions. We also expect that our model for point-to-point biting and bite depth estimations will yield new insights into the behaviours of a broad range of extinct predators including therocephalians (gorgonopsian + cynodont, sabretoothed mammal-like reptiles), sauropterygians (marine reptiles) and theropod dinosaurs.

  • 33. Andersson, Ki
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivora from the Late Miocene of Lantian, China2005In: Vertebrata PalAsiatica, Vol. 43, p. 256-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediments of the Bahe and Lantian formations, Lantian area, Shaanxi Province, China, have produced a large number of mammalian fossils. This Late Miocene sequence provides evidence for a period of major changes in the physical environment of the region. The carnivoran fossils are described and analyzed herein. The following species are present: lctitherium viverrinum, Hyaenictitherium cf . H. wongii and Adcrocuta eximia ( Hyaenidae) , cf. Metailurus major and cf. Metailurus parvulus ( Felidae) . Although a difference in the composition of the carnivoran fauna is noted towards the boundary between the Bahe Formation (lower) and Lantian Formation (upper), the cause of this is yet to be determined.

  • 34. Angerbjorn, Anders
    et al.
    Eide, Nina E.
    Dalen, Love
    Elmhagen, Bodil
    Hellstrom, Peter
    Ims, Rolf A.
    Killengreen, Siw
    Landa, Arild
    Meijer, Tomas
    Mela, Matti
    Niemimaa, Jukka
    Noren, Karin
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Yoccoz, Nigel G.
    Henttonen, Heikki
    Carnivore conservation in practice: replicated management actions on a large spatial scale2013In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Arcadia, Linda in
    et al.
    Knudsen, Kerry
    Czech University of Life Sciences.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2341) Proposal to conserve the name Lichen fuscatus Scgrad. (Acarospora fuscata) against L. fuscatus Lam. with a conserved type (lichenised Ascomycota: Acarosporaceae)2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 168-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Arcalís-Planas, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Universitat de Barcelona.
    Sveegaard, Signe
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Harding, Karin C.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Wåhlin, Anna
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Härkönen, Tero
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Teilmann, Jonas
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Limited use of sea ice by the Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii), in Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, using telemetry and remote sensing data2015In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Ariyawansa, H.A
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Erratum to: Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa.2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, p. 275-277Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Ariyawansa, H.A.
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, p. 27-274Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Armands, Gösta
    et al.
    Claesson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Johansson, Åke
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lundqvist, Thomas
    En pionjär inom svensk isotopgeologi. In memoriam, Eric Welin, 1923-20142015In: Geologiskt forum, Vol. 22, no 85, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40. Armstrong, Kate E.
    et al.
    Stone, G. H.
    Nicholls, J. A.
    Valderama, E.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Smedmark, Jenny
    Gautier, L.
    Naciri, Y
    Milne, R.
    Richardson, James E.
    Patterns of diversification amongst tropical regions compared: a case study in Sapotaceae.2014In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 5, no 362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species diversity is unequally distributed across the globe,with the greatest concentration occurring in the tropics. Even within the tropics, there are significant differences in the numbers of taxa found in each continental region. Manilkara is a pantropical genus of trees in the Sapotaceae comprising c.78 species. Its distribution allows for biogeographic investigation and testing of whether rates of diversification differ amongst tropical regions. The age and geographical origin of Manilkara are inferred to determine whether Gondwanan break-up, boreotropical migration or long distance dispersal have shaped its current disjunct distribution. Diversification rates through time are also analyzed to determine whether the timing and tempo of speciation on each continent coincides with geoclimatic events. Bayesian analyses of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (rpl32-trnL,rps16-trnK,and trnS-trnFM) sequences were used to reconstruct a species level phylogeny of Manilkara and related genera in the tribe Mimusopeae. Analyses of the nuclear data using a fossil-calibrated relaxed molecular clock indicate that Manilkara evolved 32–29 million years ago (Mya) in Africa. Lineages within the genus dispersed to the Neotropics 26–18 Mya and to Asia 28–15 Mya. Higher speciation rates are found in the Neotropical Manilkara clade than in either African or Asian clades. Dating of regional diversification correlates with known palaeoclimatic events. In South America, the divergence between Atlantic coastal forest and Amazonian clades coincides with the formation of drier Cerrado and Caatinga habitats between them. In Africa diversification coincides with Tertiary cycles of aridification an duplif tof the east African plateaux. In South east Asia dispersal may have been limited by the relatively recent emergence of land in New Guinea and islands further east c.10 Mya.

  • 41.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Microstomum (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomorpha, Microstomidae) from the Swedish west coast: two new species and a population description2018In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, no 398, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Augustsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Uddh-Söderberg, Terese
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Filipsson, Monika
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berglund, Marika
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hogmalm, Johan
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Alriksson, Stina
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Challenges in assessing the health risks of consuming vegetables in metal-contaminated environments2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 113, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great deal of research has been devoted to the characterization of metal exposure due to the consumption of vegetables from urban or industrialized areas. It may seem comforting that concentrations in crops, as well as estimated exposure levels, are often found to be below permissible limits. However, we show that even a moderate increase in metal accumulation in crops may result in a significant increase in exposure. We also highlight the importance of assessing exposure levels in relation to a regional baseline. We have analyzed metal (Pb, Cd, As) concentrations in nearly 700 samples from 23 different vegetables, fruits, berries and mushrooms, collected near 21 highly contaminated industrial sites and from reference sites. Metal concentrations generally complied with permissible levels in commercial food and only Pb showed overall higher concentrations around the contaminated sites. Nevertheless, probabilistic exposure assessments revealed that the exposure to all three metals was significantly higher in the population residing around the contaminated sites, for both low-, median- and high consumers. The exposure was about twice as high for Pb and Cd, and four to six times as high for As. Since vegetable consumption alone did not result in exposure above tolerable intakes, it would have been easy to conclude that there is no risk associated with consuming vegetables grown near the contaminated sites. However, when the increase in exposure is quantified, its potential significance is harder to dismiss – especially when considering that exposure via other routes may be elevated in a similar way.

  • 43. Augustsson, Carita
    et al.
    Rüsing, Tobias
    Niemeyer, Hans
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Berndt, Jasper
    Bahlburg, Heinrich
    Zimmermann, Udo
    0.3 byr of drainage stability along the Palaeozoic palaeo-Pacific Gondwana margin; a detrital zircon study2015In: Journal of the Geological Society, ISSN 0016-7649, E-ISSN 2041-479X, Vol. 172, p. 186-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The palaeo-Pacific margin of Gondwana in the present-day south–central Andes is marked by tectonic activity related to subduction and terrane accretion. We present detrital zircon U–Pb data encompassing the Palaeozoic era in northern Chile and northwestern Argentina. Cathodoluminescence images reveal dominantly magmatic zircon barely affected by abrasion and displaying only one growth phase. The main age clusters for these zircon grains are Ediacaran to Palaeozoic with an additional peak at 1.3–0.9 Ga and they can be correlated with ‘Grenvillian’ age, and the Brasiliano, Pampean, and Famatinian orogenies. The zircon data reveal main transport from the nearby Ordovician Famatinian arc and related rocks. The Silurian sandstone units are more comparable with Cambrian units, with Brasiliano and Transamazonian ages (2.2–1.9 Ga) being more common, because the Silurian deposits were situated within or east of the (extinct) Famatinian arc. Hence, the arc acted as a transport barrier throughout Palaeozoic time. The complete suite of zircon ages does not record the accretions of exotic terranes or the Palaeozoic glacial periods. We conclude that the transport system along the palaeo-Pacific margin of Gondwana remained stable for c. 0.3 byr and that provenance data do not necessarily reflect the interior of a continent. Hence, inherited geomorphological features must be taken into account when detrital mineral ages are interpreted.

  • 44. Autenrieth, Marijke
    et al.
    Hartmann, Stefanie
    Lah, Ljerka
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Dennis, Alice B.
    Tiedemann, Ralph
    High‐quality whole‐genome sequence of an abundant Holarctic odontocete, the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)2018In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is a highly mobile cetacean found across the Northern hemisphere. It occurs in coastal waters and inhabits basins that vary broadly in salinity, temperature and food availability. These diverse habitats could drive subtle differentiation among populations, but examination of this would be best conducted with a robust reference genome. Here, we report the first harbour porpoise genome, assembled de novo from an individual originating in the Kattegat Sea (Sweden). The genome is one of the most complete cetacean genomes currently available, with a total size of 2.39 Gb and 50% of the total length found in just 34 scaffolds. Using 122 of the longest scaffolds, we were able to show high levels of synteny with the genome of the domestic cattle (Bos taurus). Our draft annotation comprises 22,154 predicted genes, which we further annotated through matches to the NCBI nucleotide database, GO categorization and motif prediction. Within the predicted genes, we have confirmed the presence of >20 genes or gene families that have been associated with adaptive evolution in other cetaceans. Overall, this genome assembly and draft annotation represent a crucial addition to the genomic resources currently available for the study of porpoises and Phocoenidae evolution, phylogeny and conservation.

  • 45. BADAWY, AHMED SALAH
    et al.
    Mehlqvist, Kristina
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Calner, Mikael
    Late Ordovician (Katian) spores in Sweden: oldest land plant remains from Baltica2014In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A palynological study of the Ordovician–Silurian boundary (Katian–Rhuddanian) succession in the Röstaånga-1 drillcore, southern Sweden, has been performed. The lithology is dominated by mudstone and graptolitic shale, with subordinate limestone, formed in the deeper marine halo of southernBaltica. The palynological assemblages are dominated by marine microfossils, mainly chitinozoans and acritarchs. Sparse but well-preserved cryptospores, including Tetrahedraletes medinensis, Tetrahedraletes grayii and Pseudodyadospora sp., were encountered in the Lindegård Formation (late Katian–early Hirnantian), with the oldest record just above the first appearance of the graptolite species Dicellograptus complanatus. This represents the earliest record of early land plant spores from Sweden and possibly also from Baltica and implies that land plants had migrated to the palaeocontinent Baltica by at least the Late Ordovician.

  • 46.
    Balke, Michael
    et al.
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    A new genus and two new species of Southeast Asian Bidessini as well as new synonyms for Oceanian species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 647, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rompindessus jenisi Balke, Bergsten & Hendrich, gen. n. et sp. n. is described from near Rompin village in West Malaysia. The new genus is characterized by the presence of an occipital line and basal pronotal striae, the presence of a thick anterior bead on clypeus and two-segmented parameres as well as by the absence of basal elytral striae, the absence of sutural line on elytron, the absence of basal epipleural transverse carina, and the absence of longitudinal elytral carina. Moreover, male pro- and mesotarsus appear stout, and distinctly dilated laterally; the pronotum is comparably long and parallel-sided and the colour of beetle conspicuous dark orange. Leiodytes kualalipis Balke, Wang, Bergsten & Hendrich, sp. n. is described from West Malaysia (Pahang) and South Vietnam (Cat Tien). It is well characterized by its large size, elongate body and the form of the median lobe. Limbodessus fijiensis (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), comb. n. described from Fiji is a new synonym of Limbodessus curviplicatus (Zimmermann, 1927) described from Samoa.

  • 47. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Gilenstam, Gunnar
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    The relationships of Odontotrema (Odontotremataceae) and the resurrected Sphaeropezia (Stictidaceae) - new combinations and three new Sphaeropezia species.2013In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 384-397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Lücking, Robert
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New combinations and names in Gyalecta for former Belonia and Pachyphiale (Ascomycota, Ostropales) species2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 723-727Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Barani-Beiranvand, Hossein
    et al.
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran..
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, RDZI, Mashhad, Iran..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Bioinformat & Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Qu, Yanhua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Darvish, Jamshid
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Rodentol, Mashhad, Iran..
    Szekely, Tamas
    Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Bath, Avon, England..
    van Dijk, Rene E.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phylogeny of penduline tits inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite genotyping2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 932-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penduline tits (Remiz spp.) are renowned for their diverse mating and parenting strategies, and are a well-studied system by behavioural ecologists. However, the phylogenetic relationships and species delimitations within this genus are poorly understood. Here, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within the genus Remiz by examining the genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene of 64 individuals and in ten autosomal microsatellite markers from 44 individuals. The taxon sampling includes individuals from all currently recognized species (R. pendulinus, R. macronyx, R. coronatus, and R. consobrinus) and most subspecies in the Palearctic region. We showed that R. coronatus and R. consobrinus are genetically well differentiated and constitute independent evolutionary lineages, separated from each other and from R. pendulinus/macronyx. However, we found no evidence for significant differentiation among R. pendulinus/macronyx individuals in mtDNA haplotypes and only marginal differences between R. pendulinus and R. macronyx in microsatellite markers. Hence, based on present data our recommendation is to treat R. pendulinus and R. macronyx as conspecific and R. coronatus and R. consobrinus as separate species.

  • 50.
    Barboutis, Christos
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Henshaw, Ian
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Nikolopoulou, Stamatina
    Institute of Marine Biology and Genetics, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Iraklion, Crete,.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Fuelling in front of the barrier — are there age based behavioral differences in Garden Warblers Sylvia borin?2014In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garden Warblers Sylvia borin were studied during autumn stopover in Crete before

    crossing the barrier of theMediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Birds followed

    with transmitters show extensive stopover periods, which were longer in first-year

    birds, 16 days, compared with adult birds, 14 days. The distribution of body masses

    frombirds trapped in fig trees were used to estimate the departure body mass and the

    results found indicate that both age categories on average depart with a fuel load close

    to 100% of lean body mass. The movement of transmitter birds shows di

    fferences between

    first-year and adult birds. Adult birds move further away from the release site

    and many also left the study area. Several were found settled outside the study area,

    up to 17 km away, indicating that they regularly make longer stopover movements. It

    is suggested that this might be a result of that they return to a place where they stayed

    during an earlier migration. It was shown that stopover site fidelity exists and nine

    garden warblers were recaptured in the area during a following autumn. The results

    found highlights the importance of stopover areas close to the SaharaDesert.

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