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  • 1. Alvarez, Belinda
    et al.
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Clymans, Wim
    Fontorbe, Guillaume
    Conley, Daniel
    Assessing the Potential of Sponges (Porifera) as Indicators of Ocean Dissolved Si Concentrations2017In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 4, no 373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the distribution of sponges along dissolved silica (dSi) concentration gradients to test whether sponge assemblages are related to dSi and to assess the validity of fossil sponges as a palaeoecological tool for inferring dSi concentrations of the past oceans. We extracted sponge records from the publically available Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) database and linked these records with ocean physiochemical data to evaluate if there is any correspondence between dSi concentrations of the waters sponges inhabit and their distribution. Over 320,000 records of Porifera were available, of which 62,360 met strict quality control criteria. Our analyses was limited to the taxonomic levels of family, order and class. Because dSi concentration is correlated with depth in the modern ocean, we also explored sponge taxa distributions as a function of depth. We observe that while some sponge taxa appear to have dSi preferences (e.g., class Hexactinellida occurs mostly at high dSi), the overall distribution of sponge orders and families along dSi gradients is not sufficiently differentiated to unambiguously relate dSi concentrations to sponge taxa assemblages. We also observe that sponge taxa tend to be similarly distributed along a depth gradient. In other words, both dSi and/or another variable that depth is a surrogate for, may play a role in controlling sponge spatial distribution and the challenge is to distinguish between the two. We conclude that inferences about palaeo-dSi concentrations drawn from the abundance of sponges in the stratigraphic records must be treated cautiously as these animals are adapted to a great range of dSi conditions and likely other underlying variables that are related to depth. Our analysis provides a quantification of the dSi ranges of common sponge taxa, expands on previous knowledge related to their bathymetry preferences and suggest that sponge taxa assemblages are not related to particular dSi conditions. 

  • 2.
    Augustsson, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Uddh-Söderberg, Terese
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Filipsson, Monika
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Helmfrid, Ingela
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berglund, Marika
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hogmalm, Johan
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Alriksson, Stina
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Challenges in assessing the health risks of consuming vegetables in metal-contaminated environments2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 113, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great deal of research has been devoted to the characterization of metal exposure due to the consumption of vegetables from urban or industrialized areas. It may seem comforting that concentrations in crops, as well as estimated exposure levels, are often found to be below permissible limits. However, we show that even a moderate increase in metal accumulation in crops may result in a significant increase in exposure. We also highlight the importance of assessing exposure levels in relation to a regional baseline. We have analyzed metal (Pb, Cd, As) concentrations in nearly 700 samples from 23 different vegetables, fruits, berries and mushrooms, collected near 21 highly contaminated industrial sites and from reference sites. Metal concentrations generally complied with permissible levels in commercial food and only Pb showed overall higher concentrations around the contaminated sites. Nevertheless, probabilistic exposure assessments revealed that the exposure to all three metals was significantly higher in the population residing around the contaminated sites, for both low-, median- and high consumers. The exposure was about twice as high for Pb and Cd, and four to six times as high for As. Since vegetable consumption alone did not result in exposure above tolerable intakes, it would have been easy to conclude that there is no risk associated with consuming vegetables grown near the contaminated sites. However, when the increase in exposure is quantified, its potential significance is harder to dismiss – especially when considering that exposure via other routes may be elevated in a similar way.

  • 3.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Eriksson, Ulla
    Stockholm university.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Miller, Aroha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Consequences of using pooled versus individual samples for designingenvironmental monitoring sampling strategies2014In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, no 94, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Clymans, W.
    et al.
    Conley, D. J.
    Battles, J. J.
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Koppers, M. M.
    Likens, G. E.
    Johnson, C. E.
    Silica uptake and release in live and decaying biomass in a northern hardwood forest2016In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 97, no 11, p. 3044-3057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In terrestrial ecosystems, a large portion (20-80%) of the dissolved Si (DSi) in soil solution has passed through vegetation. While the importance of this terrestrial Si filter is generally accepted, few data exist on the pools and fluxes of Si in forest vegetation and the rate of release of Si from decomposing plant tissues. We quantified the pools and fluxes of Si through vegetation and coarse woody debris (CWD) in a northern hardwood forest ecosystem (Watershed 6, W6) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, USA. Previous work suggested that the decomposition of CWD may have significantly contributed to an excess of DSi reported in stream-waters following experimental deforestation of Watershed 2 (W2) at the HBEF. We found that woody biomass (wood+bark) and foliage account for approximately 65% and 31%, respectively, of the total Si in biomass at the HBEF. During the decay of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) boles, Si loss tracked the whole-bole mass loss, while yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) decomposition resulted in a preferential Si retention of up to 30% after 16yr. A power-law model for the changes in wood and bark Si concentrations during decomposition, in combination with an exponential model for whole-bole mass loss, successfully reproduced Si dynamics in decaying boles. Our data suggest that a minimum of 50% of the DSi annually produced in the soil of a biogeochemical reference watershed (W6) derives from biogenic Si (BSi) dissolution. The major source is fresh litter, whereas only similar to 2% comes from the decay of CWD. Decay of tree boles could only account for 9% of the excess DSi release observed following the experimental deforestation of W2. Therefore, elevated DSi concentrations after forest disturbance are largely derived from other sources (e.g., dissolution of BSi from forest floor soils and/or mineral weathering).

  • 5.
    Dahlgren, Henrik
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Kylberg, Eva
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Vasileiou, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Staveley Öhlund, Jill
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm University.
    Borg, Hans
    Stockholm University.
    Eriksson, Ulla
    Stockholm University.
    Holm, Karin
    Stockholm University.
    Egebäck, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Övervakning av metaller och organiska miljögifter i marin biota, 20142014Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Danielsson, Sara
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Vasileiou, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Contaminants in fish from potentially polluted sitesalong the Swedish coast with the nationalmonitoring programme as reference2014Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Distribution of PFAS in liver and muscle of herring, perch, cod, eelpout, arctic char, and pike from limnic marine environments in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Moraeus, Charlotta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm university.
    Egebäck, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm university.
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University.
    Kierkegaard, Amelie
    Stockholm University.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Biological effects and environmental contaminants in herring and Baltic Sea top predators2014Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fång, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm university.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm university.
    Temporal trends of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in mothers' milk from Sweden, 1972–20112013In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, no 60, p. 224-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Geng, Dawei
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Jogsten, I.E.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Kukucka, P
    Örebro Universitet.
    Hagberg, J
    Örebro Universitet.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala Universitet.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro Universitet.
    Comparison of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) and high resolution mass spectrometry for the Analysis of Polybrominated Diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Heathcote, A. J.
    et al.
    Hobbs, J. M. R.
    Anderson, N. J.
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Engstrom, D. R.
    Downing, J. A.
    Diatom floristic change and lake paleoproduction as evidence of recent eutrophication in shallow lakes of the midwestern USA2015In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 17-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive agricultural practices can dramatically change the landscape, thereby increasing the concentrations and rates at which nutrients are delivered to aquatic ecosystems. In the United States, concerns about accelerating rates of lake eutrophication related to increases in nutrient loading require a method of quantifying ecological changes that have occurred since European settlement. Because the application of traditional quantitative total phosphorus transfer functions in paleolimnology has proven difficult in shallow, hypereutrophic lakes, we used several approaches in this study to assess ecosystem changes associated with eutrophication of 32 natural lakes in the state of Iowa, USA. In addition to traditional transfer function methods, we estimated changes in primary productivity from the flux of biogenic silica (BSi) and organic carbon accumulation rates (OC AR). Additionally, we compared pre-disturbance diatom communities to modern diatom communities, i.e. floristic change, using non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and square chord distance. OC AR and BSi fluxes increased over time and were positively correlated with the time period of agricultural intensification in the region (post-1940). Ninety-one percent of the lakes in this study showed evidence for eutrophication based on geochemical proxies, and 88 % of lakes showed major floristic change in the diatom community. Whereas geochemical indicators showed consistent increases in productivity across most lakes, floristic changes reflected more complex interactions between other environmental drivers. The magnitude of floristic change did not directly correlate to nutrient-driven increases in primary production, but was driven by ecological diatom assembly related to lake depth. Transfer functions consistently perform poorly, especially for shallow lakes, and other techniques that combine geochemistry and diatom ecology are recommended for reconstructions of eutrophication.

  • 12.
    Helander, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Olofsson, Frans
    Länsstyrelsen i Västernorrland.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Länsstyrelsen i Västernorrland.
    Sundbom, Marcus
    ACES, Stockholms universitet.
    Rapportering från undersökning av trofinivå hos havsörn - stabila isotoper och miljögifter: Överenskommelse Nr 2213-13-0292016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Höga koncentrationer av PCB och DDE har konstaterats i ägg från fem havsörnshonor vid Norrlands-kusten. Möjliga förklaringar kan vara regional förorening, eller att vissa örnar lever på en högre nivå i en näringskedja där koncentrationerna ökar i varje steg. Denna rapport redovisar resultat från analyser av PCB, DDE, HCB och stabila isotoper (SI) (δ15N, δ13C) i muskel från fiskar (fyra lokaler), skarvar (tre lokaler), ägg från skarv (tre lokaler) och havsörn (två lokaler) i Västernorrlands län, och SI i ägg och fjädrar från havsörn i olika biotoper vid Östersjökusten. PCB, DDE, HCB i fiskar visade inte påtagligt högre koncentrationer än vad som rapporterats från Norrlandskusten i övrigt, men hade högre värden för PCB och HCB än vid Kvädöfjärden, Holmöarna och Örefjärden, som används som referenslokaler längs Östersjökusten inom den nationella miljöövervakningen. Koncentrationerna i muskel från skarvungar jämfört med muskel från abborre på lipidbasis var ca 3-7 ggr högre för DDE och upp till två resp. tre ggr högre för HCB och PCB (CB-153). I skarvägg jämfört med abborre var förhöjningen av koncentrationer 30-400 ggr för DDE, 30-140 ggr för PCB och 7-30 ggr för HCB. Koncentrationer av DDE och PCB (CB-153) i de högbelastade havsörnsäggen från Västernorrland var 20 respektive 40 ggr högre än i skarväggen. Hos havsörn ses en tydlig trend för både ägg och fjädrar för δ13C, som blir tyngre ju mer marin fyndplatsen antagits vara, men ingen trend för δ15N. En stegvis ökning ses för δ15N i muskelprover från olika fiskar till skarvungar och skarvägg, dock inte vidare till havsörnsägg, men däremot till havsörnsfjädrar. Avsaknaden av skillnad i δ15N mellan skarv- och havsörnsägg indikerar att de inte är jämförbara med avseende på trofiska nivåer. Statistiskt signifikanta men relativt svaga samband ses mellan koncentrationer av DDE och PCB och δ15N i hela materialet av havsörnsägg. Havsörn är på högre trofisk nivå än skarv men δ15N i örnäggen som läggs redan i mars avspeglar troligen ett inslag av däggdjurskadaver under vintern, medan fjädrarna avspeglar sommarfödan (mest fisk och fågel). Möjligheten kvarstår att högre miljögiftshalter i äggen hos vissa havsörnar kan bero på högre trofisk nivå men detta bör undersökas på fjädrar.

  • 13.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Rapportering från undersökning av DDT-PCB-HCB-HCH,PBDE-HBCD, PFAS och stabila isotoper i ägg från havsörn2015: Överenskommelse Nr 2213-15-0192016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sambandet mellan havsörnens reproduktion och miljögifter har studerats fortlöpande sedan 1960-talet.Denna rapport redovisar analyser av 22 okläckta ägg insamlade i samband med bokontroller inom NMÖ,RMÖ samt Projekt Havsörn 2015. Syftet med rapporten är att redogöra för årets analyser i jämförelsemed resultat från perioden 2010-2014, med fokus på att klargöra geografiska mönster. Årets resultat är istort jämförbara med de senaste åren. Ägg från kusten har i genomsnitt 2-5 – 4.5 gånger högre halter änägg från inlandsbeståndet. Under perioden 2009-2015 har havsörnsövervakningen återigenuppmärksammat uttorkade ägg och höga halter av miljögifter i Norra Bottenhavet (Västernorrlands länsamt norra Gävleborgs län). Norra Bottenhavets kustzon avviker tydligt från resten av Östersjön och har1.5 – 4.5 gånger högre halter av miljögifter än övriga Östersjön. 2015 analyserades ett ägg från en nylokal i Timrå-trakten med liknande halter jämfört med tidigare provtagningar från Sundsvall ochKramfors. Det är dock en liten del av beståndet i Norra Bottenhavet som förefaller lägga uttorkade äggmed höga miljögiftshalter.Generellt är korrelationerna mellan olika miljögifter i ägg analyserade 2010-2015 mycket starka ochpositiva. PFAS (perfluorerade ämnen) inkluderades i analysprotokollet 2015, och var korrelerade tillövriga miljögifter. Perfluorerade ämnen samt bromerade ämnen (PBDE och HBCD) bör därföranalyseras framöver om resurser finns. Stabila isotoper har analyserats (kol, kväve) och det finns entydlig signal som särskiljer limniska från marina miljöer. Däremot är korrelationerna mellan miljögifter ochisotopvärden svaga. När det gäller isotoper bör fler prover analyseras på fjädrar från ungar.

  • 14. Johansson, J.
    et al.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm university.
    Vestergren, Robin
    Stockholm university.
    Cousins, Ian
    Stockholm University.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Glynn, Anders
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Darnerud, Per-Ola
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Temporal trends (1999-2010) of perfluoroalkyl acids in commonly consumed food items2014In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn
    et al.
    Jensen, Sören
    Stockholms universitet.
    Hylland, K.
    Holth, T.F.
    Gunnlugsdóttir, H.
    Svavarsson, J
    Ólafsdóttir, A.
    Al-Taliawy, H
    Rigét, F.
    Strand, J.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Høydal, K.
    Halldórsson, H.P.
    Pristine Arctic: Background mapping of PAHs, PAH metabolites and inorganic traceelements in the North-Atlantic Arctic and sub-Arctic coastal environment2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 493, p. 719-728Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Miller, Aroha
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Hedman, Jenny
    Swedish EPA.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Cousins, Ian
    Stockholm University.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Temporal trends in dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxinand dibenzofurans) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in Balticherring (Clupea harengus)2013In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, p. 220-230Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Miller, Aroha
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Comparing temporal trends of organochlorines in guillemot eggs and Baltic herring: Advantages and disadvantage for selecting sentinel species for environmental monitoring2014In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 100, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Mosimane, Keotshephile
    et al.
    Struyf, Eric
    Gondwe, Mangaliso
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    van Pelt, Dimitri
    Wolski, Piotr
    Schoelynck, Jonas
    Schaller, Jörg
    Conley, Daniel
    Murray-Hudson, Mike
    Variability in chemistry of surface and soil waters of an evapotranspiration-dominated flood-pulsed wetland: solute processing in the Okavango Delta, Botswana2017In: Water SA, ISSN 0378-4738, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 104-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water chemistry is important for the maintenance of wetland structure and function. Interpreting ecological patterns in a wetland system therefore requires an in-depth understanding of the water chemistry of that system. We investigated the spatial distribution of chemical solutes both in soil pore water and surface water, along island-floodplain-channel hydrological gradients in seasonally and permanently inundated habitats between major regions in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Our results show that major cations (Ca, Na, Mg, and K), dissolved silica (DSi), dissolved boron (B), dissolved organic matter (DOC) and electrical conductivity increased significantly, at  < 0.05, from the inlet of the Delta (the Panhandle) to the distal downstream reaches, suggesting the influence of evapoconcentration. Concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, and Mn significantly decreased, at < 0.05, from the inflow of the Delta to the distal reaches. Only Na, Mn, Fe, Al, and DOC showed significant differences, at < 0.05, along the local floodplain-channel hydrological gradients, with higher solute concentrations in the floodplains than the channels. Solute concentrations in soil water exhibited similar distribution patterns to those in surface water, but concentrations were higher in soil water. Based on the results, we hypothesise that floodplain emergent vegetation and the channel-fringing vegetation in the Panhandle (a fault-bounded entry trough to the Delta) and the permanently inundated eco-region together influence the cycling of solutes that enter the Delta through uptake.

  • 19.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Eriksson, Ulla
    Stockholm university.
    Egebäck, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm university.
    Holm, Karin
    Stockholm university.
    Sundborn, Marcus
    Stockholm University.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm university.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Övervakning av metaller och organiska miljögifter i limnisk biota, 2013: Överenskommelse 213 1215 Report nr 6:20132013Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Fång, Johan
    Vasileiou, Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Eriksson, Ulla
    Stockholm university.
    Holm, Karin
    Stockholm university.
    Sundbom, Marcus
    Stockholm University.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm university.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University.
    Övervakning av metaller och organiska miljögifter i limnisk biota, 2014: Rapport nr 11:20142014Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nyberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Danielsson, Sara
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Eriksson, Ulla
    Stockholm university.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Miller, Aroha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Spatio-temporal trends of PCBs in the Swedish freshwater environment, 1981-20122014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, p. 45-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Sayer, Carl D.
    et al.
    Bennion, Helen
    Davidson, Thomas A.
    Burgess, Amy
    Clarke, Gina
    Hoare, Daniel
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Hatton-Ellis, Tristan
    The application of palaeolimnology to evidence-based lake management and conservation: examples from UK lakes2012In: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    * To help meet the requirements of water legislation, palaeolimnology has been widely used to establish ‘reference conditions’ and restoration targets for lakes. However, its potential for assessing the necessity and appropriateness of different lake management activities has been less publicized. * With reference to selected case studies covering consultancy projects commissioned by UK conservation agencies, this study highlights the important applied role of palaeolimnology. Using varying combinations of diatom, plant macrofossil and cladoceran analysis, the degree, timing and in many cases the likely drivers of ecological change were inferred for several lake sites. * From this basis advice was given on a range of lake management issues, including the need for sediment removal to combat eutrophication and/or the necessity of other nutrient reduction measures (Case study 1), the depth of sediment to be removed to maximize restoration potential through exposure of dormant banks of characean oospores (Case study 2), the requirement for fish management (Case study 3), and advice regarding fish farm expansion and licensing (Case study 4). Where possible management responses to the recommendations are outlined including any major outcomes. * All case studies illustrate the advantages, for lake management and conservation decision-making, of placing current lake ecological conditions in the context of long-term change. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 23. Schoelynck, Jonas
    et al.
    Schaller, Jörg
    Murray-Hudson, Mike
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Conley, Daniel
    van Pelt, Dimitri
    Mosimane, Keotshephile
    Gondwe, Mangaliso
    Wolski, Piotr
    Meire, Patrick
    Struyf, Eric
    The trapping of organic matter within plant patches in the channels of the Okavango Delta: a matter of quality2017In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 661-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of in-stream aquatic vegetation as ecosystem engineers in the distribution of organic matter was investigated in the Okavango Delta, one of the world’s largest oligotrophic wetlands. The Okavango channel beds are covered up to 50% with submerged macrophyte patches. By accumulating and concentrating organic matter in the sediments below the patches, macrophytes are likely able to locally forestall a deficiency of nutrients. Up to 21 times more N, 18 times more C, 13 times more P and 6 times more Si can be found in vegetated sediments compared to non-vegetated sediments. Nutrient specific accumulation relates to its relative scarcity in the overlaying water. There is a depletion of dissolved N relative to P, whereas Si is relatively abundant. The Okavango Delta water can generally be characterised as oligotrophic based on plant species composition (e.g. presence of carnivorous plants and absence of floating plants), low plant N:P ratios, and low nutrient- and element-concentrations. Local mineralization and intensified nutrient cycling in the sediments is hypothesized to be crucial for the macrophytes’ survival because it provides a key source of the essential nutrients which plants otherwise cannot obtain in sufficient quantities from the nutrient poor water. By engineering the ecosystem as such, channel vegetation also retards the loss of elements and nutrients to island groundwater flow, contributing to one of the key processes driving the high productivity of the Okavango Delta, making it unique among its kind.

  • 24. Ullah, S.
    et al.
    Huber, S.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm university.
    Temporal trends of perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids and their sulfonamide-based precursors in herring from the Swedish west coast 1991–2011 including isomer-specificconsiderations2014In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    van den Bosch, Matilda
    et al.
    United Nations Environment Programme.
    Telenius, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    UNEP/UNECE GEO-6 Assessment for the pan-European region.2016In: UNEP/UNECEGEO-6 Assessment for the pan-European region / [ed] van den Bosch, Matilda, Nairobi: UNEP/UNECE , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sixth Global Environment Outlook (GEO-6) Assessment for the pan-European region paints a comprehensive picture of the environmental factors contributing to human health and well-being at the regional level. Backed by a large body of recent, credible scientific evidence, regional-wide consultations and a robust intergovernmental process, the assessment demonstrates that regional and global multilateral environmental agreements have improved environmental conditions in the pan-European region. It also highlights the complexity of the interlinked environmental, social and economic challenges now confronting decision makers.

  • 26. Vihtakari, M.
    et al.
    Renaud, P.
    Clarke, L.J.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Hop, H.
    Carroll, M.L.
    Ambrose, W.
    Decoding the oxygen isotope signal for seasonal growth patterns in Arctic bivalves.2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 446, p. 263-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical and physical variations in skeletal structures of marine organisms can reflect environmental variability, forming the basis for reconstructing the conditions in which the organism lived. The successful use of these bio-archives for reconstructing seasonal environmental conditions is dependent on understanding intra-annual growth patterns and timing of their deposition within skeletal structures. We studied intra-annual shell growth patterns, as well as the timing and environmental processes associated with winter growth line deposition in two circumpolar bivalve mollusks, Serripes groenlandicus and Ciliatocardium ciliatum. Shell growth deposited during a 1-year deployment on oceanographic moorings in Kongsfjorden and Rijpfjorden, Svalbard, was analyzed in situ for δ18O values using high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A new digital method was developed to measure the location of SIMS spots along chronologically deposited shell material. Dynamic time warping algorithms were adapted to align SIMS-determined δ18O values with δ18O values predicted from continuous mooring instrument recordings of seawater temperature and salinity, in order to derive intra-annual shell growth models. The resulting growth models indicated that the prominent winter growth band was formed during a slow shell growth period lasting from December until May in Kongsfjorden and from November until mid-June in Rijpfjorden. The length of the slow growth period was most likely controlled by food availability. Shell growth rate during the growing season was significantly explained by temperature (marginal R2 = 0.29, p < 0.001) indicating that temperature partly drives shell growth rate when the food supply is sufficient. The insights into intra-annual shell growth of Arctic bivalves and the methods developed in our study are important contributions for further development of bivalve shells as proxy archives.

  • 27.
    Winnberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Rydén, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet.
    Löfstrand, Karin
    Stockholms universitet.
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Stockholms universitet.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Marsh, Göran
    Stockholms universitet.
    Novel Octabrominated Phenolic Diphenyl Ether Identified in Blue Mussels from the Swedish West Coast2014In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, p. 3319-3326Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Xu, M.
    et al.
    Qui, Yan-Ling
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Zhou, Y.
    Zhu, Z.
    Zhao, J.
    Organochlorines in free-range hen and duck eggs from Shanghai: occurrence and risk assessment2015In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 28 of 28
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