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  • 1.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sallstedt, Therese
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Belivanova, Veneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Three-dimensional preservation of cellular and subcellular structures suggests 1.6 billion-year-old crown-group red algae2017In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 1-38, article id e2000735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ~1.6 Ga Tirohan Dolomite of the Lower Vindhyan in central India contains phosphatized stromatolitic microbialites. We report from there uniquely well-preserved fossils interpreted as probable crown-group rhodophytes (red algae). The filamentous form Rafatazmia chitrakootensis n. gen, n. sp. has uniserial rows of large cells and grows through diffusely distributed septation. Each cell has a centrally suspended, conspicuous rhomboidal disk interpreted as a pyrenoid. The septa between the cells have central structures that may represent pit connections and pit plugs. Another filamentous form, Denaricion mendax n. gen., n. sp., has coin-like cells reminiscent of those in large sulfur-oxidizing bacteria but much more recalcitrant than the liquid-vacuole-filled cells of the latter. There are also resemblances with oscillatoriacean cyanobacteria, although cell volumes in the latter are much smaller. The wider affinities of Denaricion are uncertain. Ramathallus lobatus n. gen., n. sp. is a lobate sessile alga with pseudoparenchymatous thallus, “cell fountains,” and apical growth, suggesting florideophycean affinity. If these inferences are correct, Rafatazmia and Ramathallus represent crown-group multicellular rhodophytes, antedating the oldest previously accepted red alga in the fossil record by about 400 million years.

  • 2. Bergström, L. Gunnar W.
    et al.
    Bergquist, Sara
    Stenhagen, Gunnar
    Gahmberg, Carl G.
    Campos D. Maia, Arthur
    Nordenstam, BertilThe Indonesian government fears that demand for palm oil in Europe could falter
    Floral scent chemistry within the genus Linnaea (Caprifoliaceae)2018In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, article id e01732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Beauty bush’ and ‘twin ower’ are common names attributed to two well-recognizable species belonging to the genus Linnaea (16 spp.) – L. amabilis and L. borealis – long admired by botanists and gardeners for their perfumed paired bell-shaped owers. In the present study, we investigated their oral scent compositions through gas chro- matography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of dynamic headspace samples. Because the owers of L. borealis in wild populations are fragrant both during the day and in the evening, circadian variation of scent emission was also assessed for this species. In total, 26 chemical compounds comprise the oral scent bouquets of L. amabilis and L. borealis, identi ed as monoterpenes (14), benzenoids and phenyl- propanoids (5), aliphatics (3), sesquiterpenes (3) and irregular terpenes (1). Whereas monoterpenes, notably (-)-α- and β-pinene, dominated the scent of L. amabilis (over 82% relative abundance), benzene derivates: 1,4 dimethoxybenzene, anisalde- hyde, 2-phenylethanol, benzaldehyde and nicotinaldehyde were exclusive to anal- ysed headspace samples of L. borealis, accounting for 52% to 100% of their relative compositions, in three Swedish populations. A southwestern Finnish population was characterized by the four rst mentioned benzenoid compounds and large amounts of (-)-α- and β-pinenes plus two aliphatic substances. e scent compounds identi- ed for both species are ubiquitous and may serve as generalist attractants/stimulants for a broad assortment of anthophilous insects. e basic work on the ower scent of L. amabilis and L. borealis should inspire studies of their pollination biology, primarily the behaviour-guiding roles of the characteristic emitted volatiles. 

  • 3.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mass-occurrence of springtails on Tortula cernua: A field-observation ofpossible animal-mediated fertilization2015In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cronberg, Nils
    Can the meiotic sex ratio explain the sex ratio bias in adult populations in the dioicous moss Drepanocladus lycopodioides?2017In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lienhard, Luc
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Effects of land use practices on arable bryopytes in the Swiss lowlands - a 30-year monitoring study using hornworts amodel organisms.2017Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lienhard, Luc
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Entwicklung von Ackermoospopulation und ihren Lebensräumen im Schweizer Mittelland während der letzten 25 Jahre.: 2nd adinterim report, unpubl. Contract-number 06.0126.PZ I P083-02652017Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    van Rooy, Jacques
    South African National Biodiversity Institute,.
    IUCN SSC BryophyteSpecialist Group, 2016-2017 Report2018Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zetter, Reinhard (Contributor)
    Pollen and spores of the uppermost Eocene Florissant Formation, Colorado: A combined light and scanning electron microscopy study2016In: Grana, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 179-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The uppermost Eocene Florissant Formation, Rocky Mountains, Colorado, has yielded numerous insect, vertebrate, and plant fossils. Three previous comprehensive palynological studies investigated sections of lacustrine deposits of the Florissant Formation and documented the response of plant communities to volcanic eruptive phases but overall found little change in plant composition throughout the investigated sections. These studies reported up to 150 pollen and spore phenotypes. In the present paper we used a taxonomic approach to the investigation of dispersed pollen and spores of the Florissant Formation. Sediment samples from the shale units containing macrofossils were investigated using light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The general picture of the palynoflora is in agreement with previous studies. However, the combined LM and SEM investigation provides important complementary information to previous LM studies. While a fairly large amount of previous pollen determinations could be confirmed, the purported taxonomic affinities of several pollen phenotypes need to be revised. For example, pollen referred to as Podocarpus or Podocarpidites sp. belongs to the Pinaceae Cathaya, Malus/Pyrus actually belongs to Dryadoideae, pollen of the form genus Boehlensipollis referred to as Proteaceae/Sapindaceae/Elaeagnaceae or Cardiospermum belongs to Sapindaceae but not to Cardiospermum, and pollen of Persicarioipollis sp. B with previously assumed affinities to Polygonaceae actually belongs to Thymelaeaceae. Pandaniidites and one type of Malvacipollis cannot be linked with Pandanaceae and Malvaceae. A few taxa are new records for Florissant (Ebenaceae: Diospyros; Mernispermaceae; Trochodendraceae: Tetracentron). In general, SEM investigations complement the LM palynological studies and improve the identification of dispersed pollen and spores and enable integration of data from dispersed fossil pollen into a wide range of comparative morphological, taxonomic, evolutionary, biogeographic, and phylogenetic studies.

  • 9.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The middle Miocene palynofloras of the Salihpaşalar lignite mine (Yatağan Basin, southwest Anatolia): environmental characterisationand comparison with palynofloras from adjacent basins2019In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the third part of an ongoing investigation of middle Miocene palynofloras in the Yatağan Basin (YB), southwestern Anatolia, thepalynofloras of the Salihpaşalar lignite mine in the main YB were studied. Seven types of algal spores, aplanospores/zygospores orcysts, six types of lycophyte and fern spores, 12 types of gymnosperm pollen and 90 types of angiosperm pollen were identified. Of atotal of ca. 140 plant taxa described from the YB, over 10% are confined to the Salihpaşalar assemblage. Differences between coevalpalynofloras of the Sekköy Member might reflect changing or prograding depositional environments. A number of rare accessorialtaxa reflect these local differences: Pilularia, Valeriana, Drosera and Persicaria aff. amphibia only occur at Salihpaşalar and aretypical of shallow water or temporary ponds associated with a lake shore. Apart from this, all the palynofloras, originating from thelignite seams and overlying limnic limestones (uppermost Turgut and Sekköy Member), of the YB are strongly indicative of extensivewoody vegetation with a dominance of diverse Fagaceae and Pinaceae. In addition, a list comparing the well-documented YBpalynomorphs to morphologically similar palynomorphs of published late early to middle Miocene plant assemblages of westernAnatolian was compiled. Such a comparison reveals that in many instances different taxon names have been used to denote the sametaxa. Hence, resolving these synonymies is a prerequisite of any meaningful comparison of palynofloras in the region.

  • 10.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Denk, Thomas
    An overview of the palynoflora of the Miocene Yatağan basin, Turkey2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The palynoflora of the lignite strip mines of the Yatağan basin, located in the Muğla province of western Turkey, is the focus of this study. Samples were taken from the Eskihisar, Salihpasalar and Tinaz mines. In the Yatağan basin two Miocene formations, formed from river and lake deposits, Eskihisar Formation (middle Miocene) and Yatağan Formation (late Miocene) have been designated. Both show a general lithology consisting of conglomerate, sandstone, claystone, limestone and tuffite, the mined/excavated lignite bearing strata are restricted to the Eskihisar Formation.

    Until now, pollen from the Yatağan basin has mostly been described according to conventional morphological nomenclature, using light microscopy (LM) only. In this study, the same individual pollen grains are investigated by using both, LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The  high resolution pictographs allow a higher taxonomic resolution.

    The rich palynoflora (Table 1) is comprised of diverse spores (at least nine morphotypes), gymnosperm pollen from Cupressaceae, Gnetales, Pinaceae, and angiosperm pollen from Poaceae, Typhaceae, Altingiaceae,  Amaranthaceae (Chenopodieae), Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Betulaceae, Buxaceae, Caprifoliaceae (Dipsacoideae, Lonicera) Caryophyllaceae, Compositae (Asteroideae, Cichoriodeae), Cornaceae, Eucommiaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae (Fagus, Quercus, Trigonobalanopsis) Geraniaceae, Juglandaceae, Malvaceae, Myricaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Oleaceae, Palmae, Plumbaginaceae (Armeria, Plumbago), Polygonaceae (Rumex), Salicaceae, Sapindaceae (Acer), Smilacaceae, and Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum, Ulmus, Zelkova).

  • 11.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Güner, Tuncay H.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Botany, Istanbul University Cerrahpa¸sa, 34473 Bahçeköy, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Denk, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Middle Miocene climate of southwestern Anatolia from multiple botanical proxies2018In: Climate of the Past Discussions, ISSN 1814-9340, E-ISSN 1814-9359, Vol. 14, p. 1427-1440Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The middle Miocene climate transition (MMCT) was a phase of global cooling possibly linked to decreasing levels of atmospheric CO2. The MMCT coincided with the European  Mammal Faunal Zone MN6. From this time, important biogeographic links between Anatolia  and eastern Africa include the hominid Kenyapithecus. Vertebrate fossils suggested mixed  open and forested landscapes under (sub)tropical seasonal climates for Anatolia. Here, we  infer the palaeoclimate during the MMCT and the succeeding cooling phase for a middle Miocene (14.8–13.2 Ma) of an intramontane basin in southwestern Anatolia using three2palaeobotanical proxies: (i) Köppen signatures based on the nearest-living-relative principle. (ii) Leaf physiognomy analysed with the Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program (CLAMP). (iii) Genus-level biogeographic affinities of fossil floras with modern regions. The three proxies reject tropical climates for the MMCT of southwestern Anatolia and instead infer warm temperate C climates. Köppen signatures reject summer-dry Cs climates but cannot discriminate between fully humid Cf and winter-dry Cw; CLAMP reconstructs Cf climate based on the low X3.wet/X3.dry ratio. Additionally, we assess whether the palaeobotanical record does resolve transitions from the warm Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO, 16.8–14.7 Ma) into the MMCT (14.7–13.9 Ma), and a more pronounced cooling at 13.9–13.8 Ma, as reconstructed from benthic stable isotope data. For southwestern Anatolia, we find that arboreal taxa predominate in MCO floras (MN5), whereas in MMCT floras (MN6) abundances of arboreal and non-arboreal elements strongly fluctuate indicating higher structural complexity of the vegetation. Our data show a distinct pollen zone between MN6 and MN7+8 dominated by herbaceous taxa. The boundary MN6 and MN7+8, roughly corresponding to a first abrupt cooling at 13.9–13.8 Ma, possibly might be associated with this herb-rich pollen zone.

  • 12.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Güner, Tuncay H.
    Denk, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Palynological and palaeobotanical investigations in the Miocene Yatağan basin, Turkey: High-resoluton taxonomy and biostratigraphy2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this study is the palynology (biostratigraphic and taxonomic) and the plant remains of the lignite strip mines of Eskihisar, Salihpasalar, and Tinaz (Muğla province, western Turkey). In the Yatağan basin two Miocene to Pliocene formations are present, the Eskihisar Formation (early to middle Miocene) and the Yatağan Formation (late Miocene to early Pliocene). Both formations represent river and lake deposits consisting mainly of conglomerate, sandstone, claystone, limestone, tuffite, and intercalated lignite; the thickest, actively mined lignite seams occur in the Sekköy member of the Eskihisar Formation.

    Previous palynological studies of the palynoflora of the Yatağan basin mainly focussed on its biostratigraphic and palaeoclimatic significance, using conventional morphological nomenclature and light microscopy (LM).

    In this study the „single grain method“ is applied. Using this method, the same individual pollen grains are investigated by using both LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The resulting high-resolution pictographs enable a much higher taxonomic resolution.

     

    The studied palynoflora is very rich and taxonomically diverse. Cryptogams are represented by more than ten spore morphotypes of at least three families (Osmundaceae, Pteridaceae, Polypodiaceae). Gymnosperm pollen is dominated by Cupressaceae, Gnetales (Ephedra), and Pinaceae (Cathaya, Keteleeria, Pinus). Angiosperm pollen can be assigned to 57 different genera belonging to Poaceae, Typhaceae, Altingiaceae, Amaranthaceae (Chenopodieae), Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae (three types), Asteraceae (Asteroideae, Cichoriodeae), Betulaceae (Alnus, Betula, Carpinus, Ostrya) Buxaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae (Lonicera), Caryophyllaceae, Dipsacaceae, Eucommiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae (Fagus, Quercus, Trigonobalanopsis) Geraniaceae, Juglandaceae, Linnaceae (Linnum), Malvaceae, Myricaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Oleaceae (four different types), Plumbaginaceae (Armeria,), Polygonaceae (Rumex), Rosaceae, Sapindaceae (Acer), Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum, Ulmus, Zelkova), and Zingiberales (Spirematospermum).

     

    In addition, more than two thousand plant macrofossils were collected in the course of repeated field trips, including remains of Pinaceae, Berberidiaceae (Mahonia), Betulaceae (Alnus, Carpinus), Buxaceae (Buxus), Fagaceae (Fagus, Quercus), Lauraceae, Malvaceae (Tilia), Myricaceae (Myrica), Rosaceae, Salicaceae (Populus, Salix), Sapindaceae (Acer), Smilacaceae (Smilax), Typhaceae (Typha), Ulmaceae (Zelkova).

     

    A combined analysis integrating these rich and diverse plant macro- and microfossil records will lead to a better understanding and refined reconstruction of the vegetation in the Yatağan basin during the middle to late Miocene.

  • 13. Denk, Thomas
    Zohner, Constantin M. (Contributor)
    Renner, Susanne S.
    Plant fossils reveal major biomes occupied by the late Miocene Old-World Pikermian fauna2018In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 2, p. 1864-1870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Denk, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Güner, Tuncay H.
    , Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Kvaček, Zlatko
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. johannes.bouchal@nrm.se.
    The early Miocene flora of Güvem (Central Anatolia, Turkey): a window into early Neogene vegetation and environments in the Eastern Mediterranean2017In: Acta Palaeobotanica, ISSN 0001-6594, E-ISSN 1427-6402, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 237-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early Burdigalian (MN3) plant assemblage of the Güvem area (northwestern Central Anatolia) is preserved in lacustrine sediments of the Dereköy pyroclastics. Its age is well constrained by radiometric dates of basaltic rocks bracketing the pyroclastics, making the Güvem flora one of the extremely few precisely dated early Miocene floras in the Mediterranean region. The rich assemblage of impression fossils comprises ferns and fern allies (2 species), gymnosperms (12 spp.) and angiosperms (129 spp.). Ilex miodipyrena sp. nov. is described as a new fossil-species. The most diverse families in the assemblage are the Fagaceae with 12 taxa and the Fabaceae with 12 leaf morphotypes and one fruit taxon. Aquatic plants are represented by seven taxa, riparian (including palms) and swamp forest elements by >35 taxa, and lianas by three taxa (Smilax spp., Chaneya). The relatively large number of aquatic and riparian/swamp elements is congruent with the rich fish, amphibian and reptile record of the Güvem area. Another characteristic feature of the plant assemblage is the presence of various lobed leaves which show similarities with modern species of different families (e.g. Alangium, various Malvales). Trees and shrubs growing on well-drained soils and forming closed-canopy and open-canopy forests are the most diversified group (>70 taxa). In terms of number of specimens in the collection and based on field observations, by far the most abundant leaf fossils belong to evergreen oaks of Quercus drymeja and Q. mediterranea and to various types of foliage that cannot be assigned to a particular extant or extinct genus of Fagaceae. These sclerophyllous trees must have covered vast areas surrounding the wetlands that developed during the early Miocene in the Güvem Basin. Based on a recent reassessment of the ecology and taxonomic affinity of these trees, they are considered to reflect humid temperate climatic conditions but with a brief drier season during the winter months. These forests are more similar to the laurel forests of the southeastern United States and those stretching in a narrow belt south of the Himalayas to eastern central China. The large number of Fabaceae may indicate the presence of warm subtropical environments but this is difficult to assess, as they are known for having wide ecological ranges today and in the past. All in all, a larger part of the plant taxa point to forested vegetation. This is in agreement with previous palynological studies which detected only small amounts of herbaceous and grass pollen. Open patches of vegetation may have been restricted to river banks and to rocky areas in a volcanic landscape. The biogeographic patterns detected for the early Miocene of the Güvem assemblage are manifold; most taxa are widespread Northern Hemispheric elements. A substantial part of the species migrated from Asia into Europe during the (late) Paleogene and reached Anatolia during the early Miocene (Fagus, Paliurus, Chaneya, Ailanthus, Quercus kubinyii, Davallia haidingeri, Acer angustilobum, A. palaeosaccharinum). Fewer taxa may have been in Anatolia before they migrated to Europe (e.g. Nerium, Smilax miohavanensis, Quercus sosnowskyi). Finally, very few taxa are Anatolian endemics (e.g. Ilex miodipyrena).

  • 15. Dickison, William C.
    et al.
    Lundberg, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Paracryphiaceae2016In: Flowering Plants. Eudicots: Aquifoliales, Boraginales, Bruniales, Dipsacales, Escalloniales, Garryales, Paracryphiales, Solanales (except Convolvulaceae), Icacinaceae, Metteniusaceae, Vahliaceae / [ed] Kadereit, Joachim W., Bittrich, Volker, Springer, 2016, p. 281-285Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shrubs to medium-sized trees, some vines. Leaves alternate to almost verticillate (Paracryphia), simple, margins finely serrate or sometimes entire; stipules absent; dense pubescence on young leaves, absent on mature foliage. Flowers in axillary or terminal racemes or compound spikes, bisexual or unisexual (plants andromonoecious); perianth differentiated into 4–5 sepals and 4–5 white, free, deciduous petals (Quintinia), or with undifferentiated perianth of 4 caducous, decussate, concave, free, imbricate segments (Paracryphia); stamens 4–5 (Quintinia) or ca. 8 (Paracryphia) in a single whorl; anthers basifixed, tetrasporangiate, with longitudinal dehiscence; ovary superior (Paracryphia) or inferior (Quintinia); 8–15- (Paracryphia) or 3–5-locular (Quintinia), ovules 4 per locule (Paracryphia) or numerous; style elongated with 3–5-lobed stigma (Quintinia), or absent (Paracryphia). Fruit capsular, septicidal; seeds small, winged in Paracryphia and mostQuintina, copiously endospermic.

  • 16. Diop, Djibril
    Bruggeman-Nannenga, Maria Alida
    Mbaye, Mame Samba
    Noba, Kandioura
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Gradstein, S. Robbert
    Reeb, Catherine
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Bryophytes of Kédougou (Eastern Senegal), with akey to the Fissidens of Senegal2018In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 40, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Draper, Isabel
    et al.
    Mazimpaka, Vicente
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Molecular andmorphological circumscription of Brachytheciumcoruscum as a separate taxon from Brachytheciumalbicans (Brachytheciaceae, Bryophyta)2014In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 158, p. 182-194Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ekebom, Agneta
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Dahl, Åslög
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Pollensäsongen 2017: Sammanställning av pollenförekomsten i Sverige2018Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ekebom, Agneta
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Dahl, Åslög
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Pollensäsongen 2018: Sammanställning av pollenförekomsten i Sverige2019Report (Other academic)
  • 20. Greimler, Josef
    et al.
    Stuessy, Tod
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    López-Sepúlveda, Patricio
    Baeza, Carlos M.
    Invasive species2017In: Plants of Oceanic Islands: Evolution, Biogeography, and Conservation of the Flora of the Juan Fernández (Robinson Crusoe) Archipelago / [ed] T.F. Stuessy, D.J. Crawford, P. López-Sepúlveda, C.M. Baeza & E.A. Ruiz, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017, p. 134-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21. Grudinski, Melanie
    et al.
    Wanntorp, Livia
    Pannell, Caroline
    Muellner-Riehl, Alexandra
    West to east dispersal in a widespread animal-dispersed woody angiosperm genus (Aglaia, Meliaceae) across the Indo-Australian archipelago2014In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1149-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Grímsson, F.
    Meller, Barbara (Contributor)
    Bouchal, Johannes M. (Contributor)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Grimm, Guido (Contributor)
    Combined LM and SEM study of the middle Miocene (Sarmatian) palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin, Austria: Part III. Magnoliophyta 1 – Magnoliales to Fabales2015In: Grana, ISSN 0017-3134, E-ISSN 1651-2049, Vol. 54, p. 85-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies on the palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin show that it contains a rich

    assemblage of spores and gymnosperm pollen. Present and ongoing investigations of

    dispersed angiosperm pollen suggest a high diversity within this group, and due to the

    excellent preservation of the material some rare pollen types are recognized. The Magnoliales

    to Fabales pollen record documented here contains 30 different taxa. Only a few pollen types

    are assigned to Magnoliids (four taxa); these are rare in the pollen record. Similarly, the

    Commelinids comprise five taxa and are also rare. Most of the angiosperm pollen originate

    from Eudicots, 21 taxa. Of the angiosperm taxa documented here, Magnolia , Carex ,

    Ranunculaceae, Platanus , Trochodendron , Buxus , Cercidiphyllum , Daphniphyllum ,

    Distylium , Fortunearia , Parrotia , Parthenocissus , Vitis , Euphorbia , Salix , and

    Papilionoideae are recorded for the first time from the Lavanttal Basin. This also includes the

    first fossil pollen record of Trochodendron  worldwide and the first reliable pollen record of

    Daphniphyllum . Several of the taxa described here had a wide Northern Hemispheric

    distribution from Eocene until the end of the Miocene. Also, key relatives of the fossil taxa

    are presently confined to humid warm-temperate environments, suggesting a very mild

    climate during the middle Miocene (Sarmatian) of the Lavanttal area. Some of the taxa

    encountered also support previous observations that the sediments of the Lavanttal Basin

    accumulated in a lowland wetland environment. This is based on pollen from aquatic taxa

    thriving in lakes, streams and swamps, and pollen of terrestrial plant taxa occupying margins

    of lakes and streams, backswamps, floodplains, river plains, and hummocks. Other 

     angiosperm pollen clearly originate from plants thriving on drier substrates, reflecting various

    vegetation units of the mixed evergreen/deciduous broad-leaved/conifer forests surrounding

    the wetland basin.

  • 23. Grímsson, F.
    Bouchal, Johannes M. (Contributor)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Meller, Barbara (Contributor)
    Zetter, Reinhard (Contributor)
    Combined LM and SEM study of the middle Miocene (Sarmatian) palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin, Austria: part IV. Magnoliophyta 2 – Fagales to RosalesIn: Grana, ISSN 0017-3134, E-ISSN 1651-2049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing investigation of the middle Miocene (Sarmatian) palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin continues to show that it contains an extremely rich assemblage of angiosperm taxa. The Fagales to Rosales pollen record documented here contains 34 different taxa belonging to the Betulaceae (Alnus, Betula, Carpinus, Corylus, Ostrya), Fagaceae (Castanea, Fagus, Quercus Groups Cerris, Ilex, Cyclobalanopsis, Quercus/Lobatae), Juglandaceae (Engelhardioideae, Carya, Juglans, Pterocarya), Myricaceae (Morrella vel Myrica), Cannabaceae (Celtis), Elaeagnaceae (Elaeagnus), Rhamnaceae, Rosaceae (Prunus) and Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum, Ulmus, Zelkova). Two of the pollen types represent extinct genera, Trigonobalanopsis and Cedrelospermum, and are also reported for the first time from the Lavanttal Basin along with pollen of Rhamnaceae and Prunus. The different types of Quercus pollen are now affiliated with Groups Cerris, Cyclobalanopsis, Ilex and Quercus/Lobatae based on sculpturing elements observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Köppen signatures of potential modern analogues of the fossil Fagales and Rosales suggest a subtropical (Cfa, Cwa) climate at lower elevation and subsequent subtropical to temperate climate with altitudinal succession (Cfa→Cfb/Dfa→Dfb; Cwa→Cwb→Dwb) in the Lavanttal area during accumulation of the palynoflora. Most of the fossil taxa have potential modern analogues that can be grouped as nemoral and/or merido-nemoral vegetation elements, and the diversity of Fagales indicates a varying landscape with a high variety of niches.

  • 24. Gâteblé, Gildas
    et al.
    Barrabé, Laure
    McPherson, Gordon
    Munzinger, Jérôme
    Snow, Neil
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    One endemic plant species on average per month in New Caledonia, including eight more new species from Île Art (Belep Islands), a major micro-hotspot in need of protection2018In: Australian Systematic Botany, ISSN 1030-1887, E-ISSN 1446-5701, Vol. 31, p. 448-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The New Caledonian biodiversity hotspot contains many micro-hotspots that exhibit high plant micro- endemism, and that are facing different types and intensities of threats. The Belep archipelago, and especially Île Art, with 24 and 21 respective narrowly endemic species (1 Extinct, 21 Critically Endangered and 2 Endangered), should be considered as the most sensitive micro-hotspot of plant diversity in New Caledonia because of the high anthropogenic threat of fire. Nano-hotspots could also be defined for the low forest remnants of the southern and northern plateaus of Île Art. With an average rate of more than one new species described for New Caledonia each month since January 2000 and five new endemics for the Belep archipelago since 2009, the state of knowledge of the flora is steadily improving. The present account of eight new species from Île Art (Bocquillonia montrouzieri Gâteblé & McPherson, Cleidion artense Gâteblé & McPherson, Endiandra artensis Munzinger & McPherson, Eugenia belepiana J.W.Dawson ex N.Snow, Eugenia insulartensis J.W.Dawson ex N.Snow, Macaranga latebrosa Gâteblé & McPherson, Planchonella serpentinicola Swenson & Munzinger and Psychotria neodouarrei Barrabé & A.Martini) further demonstrates the need both to recognise the Belep Islands as a major New Caledonian micro-hotspot and to formulate concrete conservation programs for the archipelago. 

  • 25.
    Güner, Tuncay H.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Botany, Istanbul University Cerrahpa¸sa, 34473 Bahçeköy, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Köse, Nesibe
    University of Istanbul, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Botany, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Göktaş, Fikret
    Mayda, Serdar
    Denk, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Landscape heterogeneity in the Yatağan Basin (southwestern Turkey) during the middle Miocene inferred from plant macro fossils2017In: Palaeontographica. Abteilung B, Palaophytologie, ISSN 0375-0299, Vol. 296, p. 113-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant macro fossils from the lignite mines of Eskihisar, Tınaz, and Salihpaşalar (Yatağan Basin, southwestern Anatolia) were investigated. The fossils were collected from marls overlying the exploited lignite seams and represent three subbasins within the main Yatağan Basin. The age of the Eskihisar lignite seam is well constrained by vertebrate fossils (MN 6, middle Miocene). Further, lithological and palynological correlation suggests that the lignite seams and overlying marls in the three lignite mines were formed at the same time. Three distinct zonal vegetation types are reflected in the local plant assemblages: (i) In Eskihisar, Fagus and evergreen Quercus mediterranea-Q. sosnowskyi communities formed important parts of the zonal vegetation along with the deciduous Quercus kubinyii; (ii) in Tınaz, Quercus sosnowskyi-Q. mediterranea-Q. drymeja communities occurred, while Fagus is rarely encountered in the macrofossil record. (iii) In Salihpaşalar, Quercus mediterranea and Q. drymeja are the most abundant elements, while Fagus and Q. sosnowskyi are absent or nearly so. This demonstrates that local environmental conditions within a geographically restricted region varied and probably were controlled by slope aspects, edaphic conditions, and river drainage. Overall, the zonal vegetation is characterized by a high diversity of evergreen and deciduous oaks belonging to Quercus subgen. Cerris sect. Ilex and sect, Cerris and the local dominance of Fagus. The riparian vegetation was dominated by Populus, Salix and Acer, whereas Alnus and taxodiaceous Cupressaceae and ferns were very rare or absent. The mass occurrence of Quercus sosnowskyi in the Yatağan Basin floras is biogeographically interesting, as this distinct sclerophyllous oak has previously been known to occur only in late Miocene sediments of northern Greece and Abkhasia (Georgia). 

  • 26. Hallingbäck, Tomas
    et al.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bergamini, Ariel
    A glimpse of bryophyte conservation activities around the globe: Conservation reports from the members of the IUCN Bryophyte Specialist Group.2015In: Bryological Times, Vol. 141, no 2, p. 16-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Amblystegiaceae (introduction and keys), Cratoneuron, Palustriella, Platydictya (H. A. Crum & L. Hedenäs), Campyliadelphus, Campylium, Drepanocladus, Pseudocalliergon, Sanionia, Conardia (H. A. Crum & L. Hedenäs), Campylophyllum, Calliergonaceae (whole family)2014In: Flora of North America, north of Mexico. Volume 28. Bryophyta, Part 2 / [ed] Flora of North America Editorial Committee, New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Gömd och oftast glömd biodiversitet – en inblick i det som döljer sigunder artnivån2019In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 113, p. 46-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Intraspecific genetic variation in selected mosses of Scandinavian interglacial refugia suggests contrasting distribution history patterns2014In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 176, p. 295-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Molecular andmorphological incongruence among the genera around Sarmentypnum (Bryophyta: Calliergonaceae)2015In: Nova Hedwigia: Zeitschrift für Kryptogamenkunde, ISSN 0029-5035, Vol. 100, p. 279-292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mossa på mossa – ett ovanligt fynd av grön sköldmossa Buxbaumia viridis2017In: Myrinia, Vol. 27, p. 24-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Oncophorus demetrii, a fifth Scandinavian species of Oncophorus (Musci) possible to recognize by morphology2018In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 41, p. 1-9, article id linbg.01098Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Phylogeography of Alpine populations of Rhytidium rugosum (Bryophyta) in aEuropean context2017In: Alpine Botany, ISSN 1664-2201, E-ISSN 1664-221X, Vol. 127, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Southern Scandinavianlowland populations of Rhytidium rugosum(Bryophyta, Rhytidiaceae) differ significantly from those in the mountains2014In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 36, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Styv kalkmossa och andra kalkmossor i Sverige2015In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 109, p. 94-104Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tortella rigens (Bryophyta, Pottiaceae): relationships, regional variation, and conservation aspects2015In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Världens nordligaste lokaler för sandnäbbmossa2014In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 108, p. 4-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Infraspecific diversity in a spore-dispersed species with limited distribution range2015In: Systematics and Biodiversity, ISSN 1477-2000, E-ISSN 1478-0933, Vol. 13, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Reisborg, C.
    Hallingbäck, T.
    Nationalnyckeln till Sveriges flora och fauna. Bladmossor: Skirmossor-baronmossor. Bryophyta: Hookeria-Anomodon2014Book (Refereed)
  • 40. Heinrichs, Jochen
    et al.
    Scheben, Armin
    Bechteler, Julia
    Lee, Gaik Ee
    Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Singh, Hukam
    Pócs, Tamas
    Nascimbene, Paul C.
    Peralta, Denilson F.
    Renner, Matt
    Schmidt, Alexander R.
    Crown group Lejeuneaceae and pleurocarpous mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian amber2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1-15, article id e156301Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Unseen beauty of flowers – hidden signals or spectacular byproduct?2015In: Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism, ISSN 1468-8417, Vol. 19, p. 329-331Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Huttunen, Sanna
    et al.
    Ahonen, I.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Laaka-Lindberg, Sanna
    Vänni, J.
    Sammalretki Ahvenanmalle keväällä 20132014In: Bryobrotherella, ISSN 1456-2766, Vol. 17, p. 114-135Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43. Huttunen, Sanna
    et al.
    Bell, Neil
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    The evolutionary diversity of mosses – taxonomic heterogeneity and its ecological drivers2018In: Critical reviews in plant sciences, ISSN 0735-2689, E-ISSN 1549-7836, Vol. 37, p. 128-174Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Hylander, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Nemomissa, Sileshi
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mosses of southwest Ethiopian montane forests – noteson their occurrence pattern and many new country records2017In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Johansson, Jan Thomas
    et al.
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hawaiiöarnas endemiska växter - en förlorad värld?2016In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 348-380Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Kaasalainen, Ulla
    et al.
    Heinrichs, Jochen
    Renner, Mathew A. M.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons
    Lee, Gaik Ee
    Ignatov, Michael S.
    Rikkinen, Jouko
    Schmidt, Alexander R.
    A Caribbean epiphyte community preserved in MioceneDominican amber2018In: Earth and environmental science transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, ISSN 1755-6910, E-ISSN 1755-6929, Vol. 107, p. 321-331Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Botaniststafetten: Den oförbätterlige entusiasten2017In: Daphne, Vol. 28, p. 26-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Nytt om nordiska kärlväxter 20142015In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 109, p. 68-93Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49. Kooijman, Annemieke
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mettrop, Ivan
    Cusell, Casper
    Calliergon megalophyllum rediscovered in the Netherlands after 50 years: comparison to Swedish habitats2015In: Lindbergia, ISSN 0105-0761, E-ISSN 2001-5909, Vol. 38, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Kümpers, B. M. C.
    et al.
    Richardson, J. E.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wilkie, P.
    Ronse de Craene, L. P.
    The significance of meristic changes in the flower of Sapotaceae2016In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 180, p. 161-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sapotaceae belongs to the heterogeneous order Ericales and exhibits extensive diversity in floral morphology. Although pentamery is widespread and probably the ancestral condition, some clades are extremely variable in merism, with fluctuations between tetramery to hexamery and octomery, affecting different floral organs to different degrees. We assessed the different states of merism in Sapotaceae to determine the evolution of this character among different clades. The floral morphology and development of nine species from eight genera were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, floral characters related to merism were mapped onto a phylogenetic tree to analyse the distribution and evolutionary significance of merism in the family. Developmental evidence shows that changes in merism are linked to a concerted multiplication of organs among whorls and an increase in whorls through the displacement of organs. Although pentamery is reconstructed as the ancestral condition, a reduction to tetramery or an increase to a higher merism (mainly hexamery or octomery) has evolved at least five times in the family. Fluctuations in merism between different whorls are not random but occur in a coordinated pattern, presenting strong synapomorphies for selected clades. Octomery has evolved at least twice, in Isonandreae from tetramery and in Sapoteae-Mimusopinae from pentamery. Hexamery has evolved at least three times, independently in Northia, the Palaquium clade of Isonandreae and derived from octomery in Sapoteae-Mimusopinae. Three possibilities of merism increase have been identified in Sapotaceae: (1) a concerted increase affecting all organs more or less equally (Palaquium clade of Isonandreae, Sapoteae); (2) a coordinated increase in petals, stamens and mostly carpels without effect on sepals (Labourdonnaisia, Payena–Madhuca clade of Isonandreae); (3) an increase in carpels independently of other organs (Burckella, Letestua, Labramia, etc.). A major shift affecting all Sapotaceae, except Isonandreae, is the sterilization or loss of the antesepalous stamen whorl. The presence of two fertile stamen whorls in Isonandreae indicates a possible reversal or a retained plesiomorphy. In a number of genera, stamens are secondarily increased independently of changes in merism. Descriptions of flowers listing only organ numbers are thus misleading in the inference of evolutionary relationships, as they do not differentiate between changes in merism affecting the number of perianth whorls and other changes affecting the androecium, such as sterilization, loss or occasional doubling of antepetalous stamens.

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