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  • 1. Adam, B.
    et al.
    Klawonn, I.
    Svedén, J.
    Bergkvist, J.
    Nahar, N.
    Walve, J.
    Littmann, S.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lavik, G.
    Kuypers, M.M.M.
    Ploug, H.
    N2-fixation, ammonium release, and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community.2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 19, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with 15N2, Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong 15N-enrichment implying substantial 15N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of 15NH4+ from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4+ fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (<250 nm) as compared with N2-fixation within colonies. No N2-fixation was detected in autotrophic microorganisms <5 μm, which relied on NH4+ uptake from the surrounding water. Aphanizomenon released about 50% of its newly fixed N2 as NH4+. However, NH4+ did not accumulate in the water but was transferred to heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms as well as to diatoms (Chaetoceros sp.) and copepods with a turnover time of ~5 h. We provide direct quantitative evidence that colony-forming Aphanizomenon releases about half of its recently fixed N2 as NH4+, which is transferred to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  • 2. Alerstam, Thomas
    et al.
    Rosén, Mikael
    Bäckman, Johan
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Hellgren, Olof
    Flight speeds among bird species: allometric and phylogenetic effects.2007In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 5, no 8, p. e197-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight speed is expected to increase with mass and wing loading among flying animals and aircraft for fundamental aerodynamic reasons. Assuming geometrical and dynamical similarity, cruising flight speed is predicted to vary as (body mass)(1/6) and (wing loading)(1/2) among bird species. To test these scaling rules and the general importance of mass and wing loading for bird flight speeds, we used tracking radar to measure flapping flight speeds of individuals or flocks of migrating birds visually identified to species as well as their altitude and winds at the altitudes where the birds were flying. Equivalent airspeeds (airspeeds corrected to sea level air density, Ue) of 138 species, ranging 0.01-10 kg in mass, were analysed in relation to biometry and phylogeny. Scaling exponents in relation to mass and wing loading were significantly smaller than predicted (about 0.12 and 0.32, respectively, with similar results for analyses based on species and independent phylogenetic contrasts). These low scaling exponents may be the result of evolutionary restrictions on bird flight-speed range, counteracting too slow flight speeds among species with low wing loading and too fast speeds among species with high wing loading. This compression of speed range is partly attained through geometric differences, with aspect ratio showing a positive relationship with body mass and wing loading, but additional factors are required to fully explain the small scaling exponent of Ue in relation to wing loading. Furthermore, mass and wing loading accounted for only a limited proportion of the variation in Ue. Phylogeny was a powerful factor, in combination with wing loading, to account for the variation in Ue. These results demonstrate that functional flight adaptations and constraints associated with different evolutionary lineages have an important influence on cruising flapping flight speed that goes beyond the general aerodynamic scaling effects of mass and wing loading.

  • 3. Alvarez, Belinda
    et al.
    Frings, Patrick J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Clymans, Wim
    Fontorbe, Guillaume
    Conley, Daniel
    Assessing the Potential of Sponges (Porifera) as Indicators of Ocean Dissolved Si Concentrations2017In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 4, no 373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the distribution of sponges along dissolved silica (dSi) concentration gradients to test whether sponge assemblages are related to dSi and to assess the validity of fossil sponges as a palaeoecological tool for inferring dSi concentrations of the past oceans. We extracted sponge records from the publically available Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) database and linked these records with ocean physiochemical data to evaluate if there is any correspondence between dSi concentrations of the waters sponges inhabit and their distribution. Over 320,000 records of Porifera were available, of which 62,360 met strict quality control criteria. Our analyses was limited to the taxonomic levels of family, order and class. Because dSi concentration is correlated with depth in the modern ocean, we also explored sponge taxa distributions as a function of depth. We observe that while some sponge taxa appear to have dSi preferences (e.g., class Hexactinellida occurs mostly at high dSi), the overall distribution of sponge orders and families along dSi gradients is not sufficiently differentiated to unambiguously relate dSi concentrations to sponge taxa assemblages. We also observe that sponge taxa tend to be similarly distributed along a depth gradient. In other words, both dSi and/or another variable that depth is a surrogate for, may play a role in controlling sponge spatial distribution and the challenge is to distinguish between the two. We conclude that inferences about palaeo-dSi concentrations drawn from the abundance of sponges in the stratigraphic records must be treated cautiously as these animals are adapted to a great range of dSi conditions and likely other underlying variables that are related to depth. Our analysis provides a quantification of the dSi ranges of common sponge taxa, expands on previous knowledge related to their bathymetry preferences and suggest that sponge taxa assemblages are not related to particular dSi conditions. 

  • 4.
    Arcalís-Planas, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Biology, Universitat de Barcelona.
    Sveegaard, Signe
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Harding, Karin C.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Wåhlin, Anna
    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Härkönen, Tero
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Teilmann, Jonas
    Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University.
    Limited use of sea ice by the Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii), in Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, using telemetry and remote sensing data2015In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Barboutis, Christos
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Henshaw, Ian
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Nikolopoulou, Stamatina
    Institute of Marine Biology and Genetics, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Iraklion, Crete,.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Fuelling in front of the barrier — are there age based behavioral differences in Garden Warblers Sylvia borin?2014In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garden Warblers Sylvia borin were studied during autumn stopover in Crete before

    crossing the barrier of theMediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Birds followed

    with transmitters show extensive stopover periods, which were longer in first-year

    birds, 16 days, compared with adult birds, 14 days. The distribution of body masses

    frombirds trapped in fig trees were used to estimate the departure body mass and the

    results found indicate that both age categories on average depart with a fuel load close

    to 100% of lean body mass. The movement of transmitter birds shows di

    fferences between

    first-year and adult birds. Adult birds move further away from the release site

    and many also left the study area. Several were found settled outside the study area,

    up to 17 km away, indicating that they regularly make longer stopover movements. It

    is suggested that this might be a result of that they return to a place where they stayed

    during an earlier migration. It was shown that stopover site fidelity exists and nine

    garden warblers were recaptured in the area during a following autumn. The results

    found highlights the importance of stopover areas close to the SaharaDesert.

  • 6. Barboutis, Christos
    et al.
    Larsson, Leo
    Steinholtz, Åsa
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    From Mediterranean to Scandinavia – timing and body mass condition in four long distance migrants2015In: Ornis Svecica, ISSN 1102-6812, Vol. 25, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spring, long-distance migrants are considered to adopta time-minimizing strategy to promote early arrival atbreeding sites. The phenology of spring migration wasexamined and compared between two insular stopoversites in Greece and Sweden for Icterine Warbler, WoodWarbler, Spotted Flycatcher and Collared Flycatcher. All  of them migrate due north which means that some proportion of birds that pass through Greece are headingto Scandinavia. The Collared Flycatcher had the earliestand the Icterine Warbler the latest arrival time. Thedifferences in median dates between Greece and Swedenwere 3–4 weeks and the passages in Sweden weregenerally more condensed in time. The average overallspeed estimates were very similar and varied between129 and 137 km/d. In most of the species higher speedestimates were associated with years when birds arrivedlate in Greece. After crossing continental Europe birdsarrive at the Swedish study site with significantly higherbody masses compared to when they arrive in Greece andthis might indicate a preparation for arriving at breedinggrounds with some overload.

  • 7. Bennike, Ole
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Wiberg-Larsen, Peter
    A multiproxy macrofossil record of Eemian palaeoenvironments from Klaksvík, the Faroe Islands2018In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 47, p. 106-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Bergamini, Ariel
    et al.
    Studer, Lisa
    Valentini, Maya
    Jacot, Katja
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Profitieren Moose von Biodiversitätsförderflächen im Landwirtschaftsgebiet?2017In: NL-Inside, Vol. 1//17, p. 17-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ehrlén, Johan
    Korpelainen, Helena
    University of Helsinki.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    No evidence of sexual niche partitioning in a dioecious moss with raresexual reproduction2015In: Annals of Botany, ISSN 0305-7364, E-ISSN 1095-8290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims. Roughly half of the species of bryophytes have separate sexes (dioecious) and half are hermaphroditic (monoecious). This variation has major consequences for the ecology and evolution of the different species. In some sexually reproducing dioecious bryophytes, sex ratio has been shown to vary with environmental conditions. This study focuses on the dioecious wetland moss Drepanocladus trifarius, which rarely produces sexual branches or sporophytes and lacks apparent secondary sex characteristics, and examines whether genetic sexes exhibit different habitat preferences, i.e. whether sexual niche partitioning occurs.

    Methods. A total of 277 shoots of D. trifarius were randomly sampled at 214 locations and 12 environmental factors were quantified at each site. Sex was assigned to the individual shoots collected in the natural environments, regardless of their reproductive status, using a specifically designed molecular marker associated with female sex.

    Key Results. Male and female shoots did not differ in shoot biomass, the sexes were randomly distributed with respect to each other, and environmental conditions at male and female sampling locations did not differ. Collectively, this demonstrates a lack of sexual niche segregation. Adult genetic sex ratio was female-biased, with 28 females for every male individual.

    Conclusions. The results show that although the sexes of D. trifarius did not differ with regard to annual growth, spatial distribution or habitat requirements, the genetic sex ratio as nevertheless significantly female-biased. This supports the notion that factors other than sex-related differences in reproductive costs and sexual dimorphism can also drive the evolution of biased sex ratios in plants

  • 10.
    Bisang, Irene
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ehrlén, Johan
    Persson, Christin
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Family affiliation, sexratio and sporophyte frequency in unisexual mosses2014In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 174, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns of sex expression and sex ratios are key features of the life histories of organisms. Bryophytes are the only haploid-dominant land plants. In contrast with seed plants, more than half of bryophyte species are dioecious, with rare sexual expression and sporophyte formation and a commonly female-biased sex ratio. We asked whether variation in sex expression, sex ratio and sporophyte frequency in ten dioecious pleurocarpous wetland mosses of two different families was best explained by assuming that character states  evolved: (1) in ancestors within the respective families or (2) at the species level as a response to recent habitat conditions. Lasso regression shrinkage identified relationships between family membership and sex ratio and sporophyte frequency, whereas environmental conditions were not correlated with any investigated reproductive trait. Sex ratio and sporophyte frequency were correlated with each other. Our results suggest that ancestry is more important than the current environment in explaining reproductive patterns at and above the species level in the studied wetland mosses, and that mechanisms controlling sex ratio and sporophyte frequency are phylogenetically conserved. Obviously, ancestry should be considered in the study of reproductive character state variation in plants.

  • 11. Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Effects of management intensity, function and vegetation on the biodiversity in urban ponds2016In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 20, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ponds are important elements of green areas in cities that help counteract the negative consequences of urbanization, by providing important habitats for biodiversity in cities and being essential nodes in the overall landscape-scale habitat network. However, there is relatively little knowledge about the impacts of pond management intensity, function and environmental variables on urban pond biodiversity. In this study we addressed this gap by investigating which factors were correlated with the level of biodiversity in urban ponds, indicated by species richness of aquatic insects, in Stockholm, Sweden. Our study did not confirm any direct link between the perceived intensity of management or function of ponds and overall biodiversity. However, it seems that management can influence particular groups of species indirectly, since we found that Trichoptera richness (Caddisflies) was highest at intermediate management intensity. We suggest that this is caused by management of vegetation, as the amount of floating and emergent vegetation was significantly correlated with both the overall species richness and the richness of Trichoptera (Caddisflies). This relationship was non-linear, since ponds with an intermediate coverage of vegetation had the highest richness. Interestingly, the amount of vegetation in the pond was significantly affected by pond function and pond management. The overall species richness and richness of Trichoptera were also positively correlated with pond size. Since we found that the pattern of relations between species richness and environmental variables differed between the insect groups we suggest that it will be difficult to provide overall design and management recommendations for ponds in urban green areas. Therefore, it is recommended that to provide high aquatic diversity of species in urban areas one should aim at promoting high diversity of different types of ponds with differing management and environmental factors that shape them.

  • 12. Blicharska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija
    Thomsson, Michaela
    Östh, John
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Is there a relationship between socio-economic factors and biodiversity in urban ponds? A study in the city of Stockholm2017In: Urban Ecosystems, ISSN 1083-8155, E-ISSN 1573-1642, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban small water bodies, such as ponds, are essential elements of human socio-economic landscapes. Ponds also provide important habitats for species that would otherwise not survive in the urban environment. Knowledge on the biodiversity of urban ponds and the relationship between their ecological value and factors linked to urbanization and socio-economic status is crucial for decisions on where and how to establish and manage ponds in cities to deliver maximum biodiversity benefits. Our study investigates if the pattern of urban-pond biodiversity can be related to different socio-economic factors, such as level of wealth, education or percentage of buildings of different types. Because of lack of previous studies investigating that, our study is of exploratory character and many different variables are used.We found that the biodiversity of aquatic insects was significantly negatively associated with urbanisation variables such as amount of buildings and number of residents living around ponds. This relationship did not differ depending on the spatial scale of our investigation. In contrast, we did not find a significant relationship with variables representing socio-economic status, such as education level and wealth of people. This latter result suggests that the socio-economic status of residents does not lead to any particular effect in terms of the management and function of ponds that would affect biodiversity. However, there is a need for a finer-scale investigation of the different potential mechanism in which residents in areas with differing socio-economic status could indirectly influence ponds.

  • 13. Büdel, B.
    et al.
    Colesie, C.
    Green, T.G.A.
    Grube, Martin
    Lázaro Suau, R.
    Loewen-Schneider, K.
    Maier, S.
    Peer, T.
    Pintado, A.
    Raggio, J.
    Ruprecht, U.
    Sancho, L. G.
    Schroeter, B.
    Türk, R.
    Weber, B.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Williams, L.
    Zheng, L.
    Improved appreciation of the functioning and importance of biological soil crusts in Europe – the Soil Crust International project (SCIN)2014In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 23, p. 1639-1658Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Carlström, Julia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    ASCOBANS Recovery Plan for Baltic Harbour Porpoises: Jastarnia Plan (2016 Revision)2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the ASCOBANS species action plan for what is called Baltic harbour porpoise population primarily inhabiting the Baltic Proper. The population’s abundance has recently been estimated at only 497 individuals (95% CI 80 –1091) and it has a wide overall distribution range. During the winter season, it stretches from the Åland and Archipelago Seas in the north, to the Southern Baltic Proper in the southwest, and perhaps even further west thereof. In the summer season, however, when calving and mating take place, the majority of the population aggregates at and around the Hoburg’s and Northern and Southern Mid-sea banks in the Baltic Proper. Thus, this area should be considered essential and probably the main breeding area for the Baltic harbour porpoise population. The population’s current status calls for immediate conservation actions. Bycatch in gillnet fisheries has been recognized as the primary threat for the survival of the Baltic harbour porpoise population, although high contaminant levels are also of serious concern. Continuous and impulsive underwater noise and possibly also reduced prey quality are further contributing factors.

    The Jastarnia Plan serves as a framework for international collaboration towards achieving ASCOBANS’ interim goal of restoring the population to at least 80per cent of carrying capacity, and, ultimately, a favourable conservation status for Baltic harbour porpoises. The plan lists a number of actions, of which the following should be carried out as a matter of urgency:

    1.Involve stakeholders, use alternative fishing gear, apply available technology such as pingers, and reduce or eliminate fishing effort to reduce the number of bycaught harbour porpoises in the Baltic towards zero.

    2.Designate marine protected areas for harbour porpoises together with management plans and monitoring schemes for efficient contribution to the protection and monitoring of the population.

    3.Minimize the impact of anthropogenic underwater noise through the use of available mitigation measures and implementation of internationally harmonized national threshold limits and guidelines.

    The outline of the Plan is as follows:

    1.Introduction: An outline of the scope, context and policy setting of the Plan, including information on previous conservation management actions, as well as overall objectives.

    2.Legal frameworks: A list of relevant legal frameworks, including international conventions and agreements, European and national legislation and management arrangements.

    3.Governance: An outline of the management structure identifying the roles, responsibilities and interactions between the key stakeholders, as well as the timeline from the development stage through the implementation and review stages.

    4.Scientific background: Information on biology, status, environmental parameters, critical habitats, and attributes of the population to be monitored.

    5.Threats, mitigation measures and monitoring: A summary of the known or suspected threats together with a discussion of their evidence of impact, and the mitigation measures for the key threats and how they will be monitored.

    6.Actions: Descriptions of actions including information such as concise objective, rationale, activity or method, timeline, actors and priority.

  • 15. Dalerum, Fredrik
    et al.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Miranda, Maria
    Nyström, Jesper
    Ekenstedt, Johan
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Network topology of stable isotope interactions in a sub-arctic raptor guild2016In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 182, no 2, p. 511-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predation is an ecologically important process, and intra-guild interactions may substantially influence the ecological effects of predator species. Despite a rapid expansion in the use of mathematical graph theory to describe trophic relations, network approaches have rarely been used to study interactions within predator assemblages. Assemblages of diurnal raptors are subject to substantial intra- and interspecific competition. Here we used the novel approach of applying analyzes based on network topology to species-specific data on the stable isotopes 13C and 15N in feathers to evaluate patterns of relative resource utilization within a guild of diurnal raptors in northern Sweden. Our guild consisted of the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), the gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus), the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) and the rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus). We found a modular trophic interaction structure within the guild, but the interactions were less nested than expected by chance. These results suggest low redundancy and hence a strong ecological importance of individual species. Our data also suggested that species were less connected through intra-guild interactions than expected by chance. We interpret our results as a convergence on specific isotope niches, and that body size and different hunting behaviour may mediate competition within these niches. We finally highlight that generalist predators could be ecologically important by linking specialist predator species with disparate dietary niches.

  • 16. Dias, Arildo S.
    et al.
    Santos, Karin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Maës dos Santos, Flavio Antonio
    Martins, Fernando R.
    How liana loads alter tree allometry intropical forests2016In: Plant Ecology, ISSN 1385-0237, E-ISSN 1573-5052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intense competition with lianas (woodclimbers) can limit tree growth, reproduction, andsurvival. However, the negative effects of liana loadson tree allometry have not yet been addressed. Weinvestigated the hypothesis that liana loading on treecrown alters tree’s allometry, expressed throughslenderness (height–diameter ratio). The relationshipbetween trunk slenderness and percentage of treecrown covered by lianas was investigated for 12 treespecies from 10 fragments of the SemideciduousSeasonal Forest in Southeastern Brazil. We also testedwhether the relationship between slenderness andwood density differ between trees without lianas andtrees heavily infested. Liana loads significantly alteredtree allometry by decreasing slenderness, even whenlianas covered less than 25% of tree crown. Heavywoodspecies decreased their trunk slenderness in agreater ratio than light-wood species. Our findingsindicate that liana infestation shifts tree allometry, andthese effects are stronger on heavy-wood tree species.

  • 17. Ecke, Frauke
    et al.
    Singh, Navinder J.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Berglund, Åsa M.M.
    Borg, Hans
    Bröjer, Caroline
    Holm, Karin
    Lanzone, Michael
    Miller, Tricia
    Nordström, Åke
    Räikkönen, Jannikke
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Ågren, Erik
    Hörnfeldt, Birger
    Sublethal Lead Exposure Alters Movement Behavior in Free-Ranging Golden Eagles2017In: Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 5729-5736Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Eichner, M.J.
    et al.
    Klawonn, I.
    Wilson, S.T.
    Littmann, S.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Church, M.J.
    Kuypers, M.M.M.M.
    Karl, D.M.
    Ploug, H.
    Chemical microenvironments and single-cell carbon and nitrogen uptake in field-collected colonies of Trichodesmium under different pCO22017In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 11, p. 1305-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gradients of oxygen (O2) and pH, as well as small-scale fluxes of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and O2 were investigated under different partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in field-collected colonies of the marine dinitrogen (N2)-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. Microsensor measurements indicated that cells within colonies experienced large fluctuations in O2, pH and CO2concentrations over a day–night cycle. O2 concentrations varied with light intensity and time of day, yet colonies exposed to light were supersaturated with O2 (up to ~200%) throughout the light period and anoxia was not detected. Alternating between light and dark conditions caused a variation in pH levels by on average 0.5 units (equivalent to 15 nmol l−1 proton concentration). Single-cell analyses of C and N assimilation using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS; large geometry SIMS and nanoscale SIMS) revealed high variability in metabolic activity of single cells and trichomes of Trichodesmium, and indicated transfer of C and N to colony-associated non-photosynthetic bacteria. Neither O2 fluxes nor C fixation by Trichodesmium were significantly influenced by short-term incubations under different pCO2 levels, whereas N2fixation increased with increasing pCO2. The large range of metabolic rates observed at the single-cell level may reflect a response by colony-forming microbial populations to highly variable microenvironments.

  • 19. Elmhagen, Bodil
    et al.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Borgstrom, Sara
    Boyd, Emily
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ehrlen, Johan
    Ermold, Matti
    Hamback, Peter A.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Hylander, Kristoffer
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    Lagerholm, Vendela K.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Moor, Helen
    Nykvist, Bjorn
    Pasanen-Mortensen, Marianne
    Plue, Jan
    Prieto, Carmen
    van der Velde, Ype
    Lindborg, Regina
    Interacting effects of change in climate, human population, land use, and water use on biodiversity and ecosystem services2015In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 20, no 1, article id UNSP 23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Elmhagen, Bodil
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kindberg, Jonas
    Svenska Jägareförbundet.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet.
    A boreal invasion in response to climate change? Range shifts and community effects in the borderland between forest and tundra2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Esparza-Salas, Rodrigo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Seasonally varying marine influences on the coastal ecosystem detected through molecular gut analysis2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Esparza-Salas, Rodrigo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Fish consumption of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in north western Iceland assessed by DNA metabarcoding and morphological analysis2018In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Fjellberg, Arne
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Another field-observation of a possible springtail-mediated moss sperm transfer2017In: Bryological Times, Vol. 145, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Karlsson, Måns
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stach, Robert
    Barboutis, Christos
    Inability to regain normal body mass despite extensive refuelling in great reed warblers following the trans-Sahara crossing during spring migration2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Wenninger, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Jansson, Lina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Kolehmainen, Tuomo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Kroon, Conny
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Svensk ringmärkning 20132014In: SOF 2014. Fågelåret 2013, ISSN 978-91-88124-54-8, p. 23-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Wenninger, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Jansson, Lina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kolehmainen, Tuomo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kroon, Conny
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Svensk ringmärkning 20142015In: Fågelåret 2014, Vol. Suppl, no 55, p. 25-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Wenninger, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Jansson, Lina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kolehmainen, Tuomo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kroon, Conny
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Svensk ringmärkning 20152016In: Fågelåret 2015 / [ed] P-G Bentz och Anders Wirdheim, Halmstad: BirdLife Sverige - Sveriges Ornitologiska Förening , 2016, p. 23-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Fransson, Thord
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Wenninger, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Jansson, Lina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kolehmainen, Tuomo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kroon, Conny
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Svensk ringmärkning 20162016In: Fågelåret 2016 / [ed] P-G Bentz och Anders Wirdheim, Halmstad: BirdLife Sverige - Sveriges Ornitologiska Förening , 2016, p. 23-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29. Glime, Janice
    et al.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sexuality: Sex ratio and sex expression, Chapter 3.2: Revised and updated version2017In: Bryophyte Ecology, Vol. 1. Physiological Ecology / [ed] Glime, J., Ebook sponsored by Michigan Technological University and the International Association of Bryologists , 2017, 6 March 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30. Glime, Janice
    et al.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sexuality: Sexual strategies. Chapter 3.1: Revised and updated version2017In: Bryophyte Ecology, Vol. 1. Physiological Ecology / [ed] Glime, J., Ebook sponsored by Michigan Technological University and the International Association of Bryologists , 2017, 2 April 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31. Glime, Janice
    et al.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sexuality:Reproductive barriers and trade-offs. Chapter 3.4: Revised and updated version2017In: Bryophyte Ecology, Vol. 1. Physiological Ecology / [ed] Glime, J., Ebook sponsored by Michigan Technological University and the International Association of Bryologists , 2017, 6 March 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. Glime, Janice
    et al.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sexuality:Size and sex differences. Chapter 3.3: Revised and updated version2017In: Bryophyte Ecology, Vol. 1. Physiological Ecology / [ed] Glime, J., Ebook sponsored by Michigan Technological University and the International Association of Bryologists , 2017, 31 March 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33. Graham, R. W.
    et al.
    Lundelius, E. R. Jr.
    Graham, M. A.
    Schroeder, E. K.
    Toomey, R. S. III.
    Anderson, E.
    Barnosky, A.
    Burns, J. A.
    Churcher, C. S.
    Grayson, D. K.
    Guthrie, R. D.
    Harington, C. R.
    Jefferson, G. T.
    Martin, L. D.
    McDonald, H. G.
    Morlan, R. E.
    Semken, H. A. Jr.
    Webb, S. D.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wilson, M. C.
    Spatial response of mammals to Late Quaternary environmental fluctuations1996In: Science, Vol. 272, p. 1601-1606Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Grube, Martin
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lichenized fungi and the evolution of symbiontic organization2018In: The Fungal Kingdom / [ed] Heitman, J., Howler, B.J., Crous, P.W., Stukenbrock, E.H., James, T.Y. and Gow, N.A.R., Washington DC: The American Society for Microbiology , 2018, p. 749-765Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35. Grube, Martin
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lichenized fungi and the evolution of symbiotic organization.2016In: Microbiology Spectrum, ISSN 2165-0497, Vol. 4, no 6, article id FUNK-0011-2016Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Haenel, Quiterie
    Jondelius, Ulf (Contributor)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sundberg, Per (Contributor)
    Bourlat, Sarah (Contributor)
    NGS-based biodiversity and community structure analysis of meiofaunal eukaryotes in shell sand from Hållö island, Smögen, and soft mud from Gullmarn Fjord, Sweden2017In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 5, article id e12731Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tortella rigens (Bryophyta, Pottiaceae): relationships, regional variation, and conservation aspects2015In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Are morphology andenvironment correlated with male dwarfism in pleurocarpous mosses?2015In: Arctoa: A Journal of Briology, ISSN 0131-1379, Vol. 24, p. 362-374Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Infraspecific diversity in a spore-dispersed species with limited distribution range2015In: Systematics and Biodiversity, ISSN 1477-2000, E-ISSN 1478-0933, Vol. 13, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Jakobsson, Sven
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Long-term phenological shifts and intra-specific differences inmigratory change in the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus).2015In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Heino, Jani
    et al.
    Bini, Luis M
    Andersson, Johan
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala University.
    Unravelling the correlates of species richness and ecological uniqueness in a metacommunity of urban pond insects2016In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 73, p. 422-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    City ponds have the potential to harbour a rich biodiversity of aquatic insects despite being located in an urban landscape. However, our current knowledge on the correlates of pond biodiversity is limited and even less is known about the factors that influence the ecological uniqueness of urban ponds. The multiple environmental gradients, at different spatial scales, that may affect biodiversity and ecological uniqueness of urban ponds can thus be seen both as an opportunity and as a challenge for a study. In this study, we aimed to fill this gap by focusing on aquatic insect assemblages in 51 ponds in the Swedish city of Stockholm, using a metacommunity perspective. We found that species richness was primarily determined by the density of aquatic insects, water depth and proportion of buildings around the pond. The uniqueness of ponds was estimated as local contributions to beta diversity (LCBD), and it was primarily related to the proportion of arable land and industry around the ponds. With regard to the metacommunity we found two interesting patterns. First, there was a negative relationship between richness and LCBD. Second, biodiversity was spatially independent, suggesting that spatially-patterned dispersal did not structure species richness or LCBD. These last two patterns are important when considering conservation efforts of biodiversity in city ponds. We hence suggest that the conservation of insect biodiversity in urban pond should consider the surroundings of the ponds, and that high-richness ponds are not necessarily those that require most attention because they are not ecologically the most unique.

  • 42.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Havsörnen larmar om miljögifterna2017In: Havet 1988, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 46-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Helander, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Indikator för äggskalstjocklek havsörn: Överenskommelse 1723-17 med Havs- och Vattenmyndigheten2017Report (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Helander, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Bignert, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Olofsson, Frans
    Länsstyrelsen i Västernorrland.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Länsstyrelsen i Västernorrland.
    Sundbom, Marcus
    ACES, Stockholms universitet.
    Rapportering från undersökning av trofinivå hos havsörn - stabila isotoper och miljögifter: Överenskommelse Nr 2213-13-0292016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Höga koncentrationer av PCB och DDE har konstaterats i ägg från fem havsörnshonor vid Norrlands-kusten. Möjliga förklaringar kan vara regional förorening, eller att vissa örnar lever på en högre nivå i en näringskedja där koncentrationerna ökar i varje steg. Denna rapport redovisar resultat från analyser av PCB, DDE, HCB och stabila isotoper (SI) (δ15N, δ13C) i muskel från fiskar (fyra lokaler), skarvar (tre lokaler), ägg från skarv (tre lokaler) och havsörn (två lokaler) i Västernorrlands län, och SI i ägg och fjädrar från havsörn i olika biotoper vid Östersjökusten. PCB, DDE, HCB i fiskar visade inte påtagligt högre koncentrationer än vad som rapporterats från Norrlandskusten i övrigt, men hade högre värden för PCB och HCB än vid Kvädöfjärden, Holmöarna och Örefjärden, som används som referenslokaler längs Östersjökusten inom den nationella miljöövervakningen. Koncentrationerna i muskel från skarvungar jämfört med muskel från abborre på lipidbasis var ca 3-7 ggr högre för DDE och upp till två resp. tre ggr högre för HCB och PCB (CB-153). I skarvägg jämfört med abborre var förhöjningen av koncentrationer 30-400 ggr för DDE, 30-140 ggr för PCB och 7-30 ggr för HCB. Koncentrationer av DDE och PCB (CB-153) i de högbelastade havsörnsäggen från Västernorrland var 20 respektive 40 ggr högre än i skarväggen. Hos havsörn ses en tydlig trend för både ägg och fjädrar för δ13C, som blir tyngre ju mer marin fyndplatsen antagits vara, men ingen trend för δ15N. En stegvis ökning ses för δ15N i muskelprover från olika fiskar till skarvungar och skarvägg, dock inte vidare till havsörnsägg, men däremot till havsörnsfjädrar. Avsaknaden av skillnad i δ15N mellan skarv- och havsörnsägg indikerar att de inte är jämförbara med avseende på trofiska nivåer. Statistiskt signifikanta men relativt svaga samband ses mellan koncentrationer av DDE och PCB och δ15N i hela materialet av havsörnsägg. Havsörn är på högre trofisk nivå än skarv men δ15N i örnäggen som läggs redan i mars avspeglar troligen ett inslag av däggdjurskadaver under vintern, medan fjädrarna avspeglar sommarfödan (mest fisk och fågel). Möjligheten kvarstår att högre miljögiftshalter i äggen hos vissa havsörnar kan bero på högre trofisk nivå men detta bör undersökas på fjädrar.

  • 45.
    Hellström, Peter
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Rapportering från undersökning av DDT-PCB-HCB-HCH, PBDE-HBCD och stabila isotoper i ägg från havsörn 2014: Överenskommelse Nr 2213-14-0212015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sambandet mellan havsörnens reproduktion och miljögifter har studerats fortlöpande sedan 1960-talet. Denna rapport redovisar analyser av okläckta ägg insamlade i samband med bokontroller under säsongerna 2014 och 2011. 16 ägg insamlade 2014 analyserades och dessutom 6 ägg från 2011 analyserades retrospektivt m.a.p. bromerade ämnen. Syftet med rapporten är att redogöra för årets analyser i jämförelse med de 5 senaste åren. Under denna period har havsörnsövervakningen uppmärksammat uttorkade ägg och höga halter av miljögifter i Norra Bottenhavet. Årets resultat är i stort jämförbara med de senaste åren. Några särskilt intressanta resultat: 1) Analysen av ett ägg från ett av de revir som tidigare misslyckats med häckningarna i N Bottenhavet visade överraskande på reducerade halter av miljögifter jmf med tidigare års ägg. 2) En eventuell ny tidig varningssignal har upptäckts, då ett nyetablerat par i Gävle-området uppvisade höga halter av miljögifter, men den relativa belastningen var annorlunda jmf med problemområdet i Norra Bottenhavet. Ägget från Gävle-området hade relativt höga halter av PCB och DDT. Halterna av HCB och HCH var likvärdiga med Norra Bottenhavets prover 2010-2013, medan HBCD-koncentrationen var den högsta som uppmätts hittills. Några långtgående slutsatser kan inte dras från analyser av ett ägg, men situationen bör följas upp kommande år.

    Generellt är korrelationerna mellan olika miljögifter i ägg analyserade 2010-2014 mycket starka och positiva. PBDE och HBCD bör därför analyseras framöver om det är möjligt. Norra och Södra Bottenhavet är områden där belastningen av miljögifter ur havsörnens perspektiv är avsevärt större än i södra Östersjön och sötvattenmiljöer.

  • 46.
    Hellström, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Havsörn2016In: Havet 2015/2016. Om miljötillståndet i svenska havsområden, Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2016, p. 110-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hellström, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Havsörn. Rapport från inventeringen 20152016In: Levande skärgårdsnatur, p. 28-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hellström, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Nyström, Jesper
    Stockholms universitet.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet.
    Functional responses of the rough-legged buzzard in a multi-preysystem2014In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 174, p. 1241-1254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Ivarsson, Lena Norbäck
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lundberg, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Sallstedt, Therese
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Rydin, Catarina
    Stockholm University.
    Epilithic and aerophilic diatoms in the artificial environment of Kungsträdgården metro station, Stockholm, Sweden2013In: International Journal of Speleology, ISSN 0392-6672, E-ISSN 1827-806X, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 289-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kungsträdgården metro station is an artificial and urban subsurface environment illuminated with artificial light. Its ecosystem is almost completely unknown and as a first step to better understand the biology and rock wall habitats the diatom flora was investigated. A total of 12 species were found growing on the rock walls of Kungsträdgården metro station. The results show the diatom flora in Kungsträdgården to be dominated by e.g. Diadesmis contentaDiadesmis perpusillaPinnularia appendiculataNitzschia amphibiaNitzschia sinuata and Diploneis ovalis. One species, Caloneis cf. aerophila, has never been reported from Sweden before. Significant differences in the species composition between the sampling sites indicate Kungsträdgården metro station to be a heterogeneous habitat that provides different microhabitats.

  • 50.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Oceanbottnarnas hemliga liv.2017In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, Vol. 2017, no 2, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Berggrunden under havens bottensediment är en vidsträckt men svårtillgänglig och outforskad del av vår planet, särskilt när det gäller liv. Paradoxalt nog är det, förutom haven, världens volymmässigt största livsmiljö för mikroorganismer. Med nya metoder har forskare från Naturhistoriska riksmuseet vänt upp och ner på den gängse vetenskapliga uppfattningen. I den spruckna berggrunden under havssedimenten bor inte bara de förväntade extremt tåliga bakterierna och arkéerna – de har även gott sällskap av svampar.

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