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  • 1. Ahti, Teuvo
    et al.
    Mayrhofer, Helmut
    Schultz, Matthias
    Tehler, Anders
    Fryday, Alan M
    First supplement to the lichen checklist of South Africa2016In: Bothalia, African Biodiversity & Conservation Journal, Vol. 46, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Foerschler, Marc I.
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Erratum to: Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae) (vol 65, pg 35, 2012)2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 3, 1017-1019 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Aliabadian, Mansour
    et al.
    Kaboli, Mohammad
    Förschler, Marc I
    Nijman, Vincent
    Chamani, Atefeh
    Tillier, Annie
    Prodon, Roger
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Convergent evolution of morphological and ecological traits in the open-habitat chat complex (Aves, Muscicapidae: Saxicolinae).2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 1, 35-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open-habitat chats (genera Myrmecocichla, Cercomela, Oenanthe and relative) are a morphologically and ecologically cohesive group of genera with unclear phylogenetic relationships. They are distributed mostly in open, arid and/or rocky habitats of Africa and Eurasia. Here, we present the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of this group to date, with a complete taxon sampling at the species level. The analysis, based on a multilocus dataset including three mitochondrial and three nuclear loci, allows us to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships and test the traditional generic limits. All genera are non-monophyletic, suggesting extensive convergence on similar plumage patterns in unrelated species. While the colour pattern appear to be a poor predictor of the phylogenetic relationships, some of the ecological and behavioural traits agree relatively well with the major clades. Following our results, we also propose a revised generic classification for the whole group.

  • 4. Alonso, Marta
    et al.
    Jiménez, Juan A.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cano, Maria J.
    Disentangling generic limits in Chionoloma, Oxystegus, Pachyneuropsis and Pseudosymblepharis (Bryophyta: Pottiaceae): An inquiry into their phylogenetic relationships2016In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 65, 3-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Olsson, Urban
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sundberg, Per
    Morphological, vocal and genetic divergence in the Cettia acanthizoides complex (Aves: Cettiidae)2007In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 149, no 3, 437-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Sundberg, Per
    Phylogeny and classification of the avian superfamily Sylvioidea.2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 38, no 2, 381-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sylvioidea is one of the three superfamilies recognized within the largest avian radiation, the parvorder Passerida. In the present study, which is the first taxon-dense analysis of the Sylvioidea based on sequence data (nuclear myoglobin intron II and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene), we investigate the interrelationships among the four "sylvioid" clades found by previous workers, as well as the relationships within the largest of these clades. The nuclear and mitochondrial loci estimate basically the same phylogeny, with minor differences in resolution. The trees based on myoglobin and the combined data identify a strongly supported clade that includes the taxa previously allocated to Sylvioidea, except for Sitta (nuthatches), Certhia (treecreepers), Parus (tits), Remiz (penduline tits), Troglodytes and Campylorhynchus (wrens), Polioptila (gnatcatchers), and Regulus (crests/kinglets); this clade also comprises larks, which have previously been placed in the superfamily Passeroidea. We refer to this clade as Sylvioidea. This clade is further divided into 10 main, well-supported clades, which we suggest form the basis for a revised classification.

  • 7. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Fregin, Silke
    Norman, Janette A
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Olsson, Urban
    Multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset reveal extensive non-monophyly in the avian family Locustellidae.2011In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 58, no 3, 513-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of most of the species in the avian passerine family Locustellidae is inferred using a Bayesian species tree approach (Bayesian Estimation of Species Trees, BEST), as well as a traditional Bayesian gene tree method (MrBayes), based on a dataset comprising one mitochondrial and four nuclear loci. The trees inferred by the different methods agree fairly well in topology, although in a few cases there are marked differences. Some of these discrepancies might be due to convergence problems for BEST (despite up to 1×10(9) iterations). The phylogeny strongly disagrees with the current taxonomy at the generic level, and we propose a revised classification that recognizes four instead of seven genera. These results emphasize the well known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on non-cladistic evaluations of morphological characters. An analysis of an extended mitochondrial dataset with multiple individuals from most species, including many subspecies, suggest that several taxa presently treated as subspecies or as monotypic species as well as a few taxa recognized as separate species are in need of further taxonomic work.

  • 8. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Höhna, Sebastian
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olsson, Urban
    Non-monophyly and intricate morphological evolution within the avian family Cettiidae revealed by multilocus analysis of a taxonomically densely sampled dataset.2011In: BMC evolutionary biology, ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11, 352- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The avian family Cettiidae, including the genera Cettia, Urosphena, Tesia, Abroscopus and Tickellia and Orthotomus cucullatus, has recently been proposed based on analysis of a small number of loci and species. The close relationship of most of these taxa was unexpected, and called for a comprehensive study based on multiple loci and dense taxon sampling. In the present study, we infer the relationships of all except one of the species in this family using one mitochondrial and three nuclear loci. We use traditional gene tree methods (Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood bootstrapping, parsimony bootstrapping), as well as a recently developed Bayesian species tree approach (*BEAST) that accounts for lineage sorting processes that might produce discordance between gene trees. We also analyse mitochondrial DNA for a larger sample, comprising multiple individuals and a large number of subspecies of polytypic species.

    RESULTS: There are many topological incongruences among the single-locus trees, although none of these is strongly supported. The multi-locus tree inferred using concatenated sequences and the species tree agree well with each other, and are overall well resolved and well supported by the data. The main discrepancy between these trees concerns the most basal split. Both methods infer the genus Cettia to be highly non-monophyletic, as it is scattered across the entire family tree. Deep intraspecific divergences are revealed, and one or two species and one subspecies are inferred to be non-monophyletic (differences between methods).

    CONCLUSIONS: The molecular phylogeny presented here is strongly inconsistent with the traditional, morphology-based classification. The remarkably high degree of non-monophyly in the genus Cettia is likely to be one of the most extraordinary examples of misconceived relationships in an avian genus. The phylogeny suggests instances of parallel evolution, as well as highly unequal rates of morphological divergence in different lineages. This complex morphological evolution apparently misled earlier taxonomists. These results underscore the well-known but still often neglected problem of basing classifications on overall morphological similarity. Based on the molecular data, a revised taxonomy is proposed. Although the traditional and species tree methods inferred much the same tree in the present study, the assumption by species tree methods that all species are monophyletic is a limitation in these methods, as some currently recognized species might have more complex histories.

  • 9. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Jønsson, Knud A.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ödeen, Anders
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015In: Royal Society Open Science, ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, 140364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

  • 10.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Proposal to conserve the name Adelostigma (Asteraceae: Inuleae)with a conserved type2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 2, 387-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Arcadia, Linda in
    et al.
    Knudsen, Kerry
    Czech University of Life Sciences.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    (2341) Proposal to conserve the name Lichen fuscatus Scgrad. (Acarospora fuscata) against L. fuscatus Lam. with a conserved type (lichenised Ascomycota: Acarosporaceae)2015In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 64, no 1, 168-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Ariyawansa, H.A
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Erratum to: Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa.2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, 275-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Ariyawansa, H.A.
    et al.
    Hyde, K.D.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Fungal Diversity Notes 111–252 - taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa2015In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 75, 27-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Armstrong, Kate E.
    et al.
    Stone, G. H.
    Nicholls, J. A.
    Valderama, E.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Smedmark, Jenny
    Gautier, L.
    Naciri, Y
    Milne, R.
    Richardson, James E.
    Patterns of diversification amongst tropical regions compared: a case study in Sapotaceae.2014In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 5, no 362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species diversity is unequally distributed across the globe,with the greatest concentration occurring in the tropics. Even within the tropics, there are significant differences in the numbers of taxa found in each continental region. Manilkara is a pantropical genus of trees in the Sapotaceae comprising c.78 species. Its distribution allows for biogeographic investigation and testing of whether rates of diversification differ amongst tropical regions. The age and geographical origin of Manilkara are inferred to determine whether Gondwanan break-up, boreotropical migration or long distance dispersal have shaped its current disjunct distribution. Diversification rates through time are also analyzed to determine whether the timing and tempo of speciation on each continent coincides with geoclimatic events. Bayesian analyses of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (rpl32-trnL,rps16-trnK,and trnS-trnFM) sequences were used to reconstruct a species level phylogeny of Manilkara and related genera in the tribe Mimusopeae. Analyses of the nuclear data using a fossil-calibrated relaxed molecular clock indicate that Manilkara evolved 32–29 million years ago (Mya) in Africa. Lineages within the genus dispersed to the Neotropics 26–18 Mya and to Asia 28–15 Mya. Higher speciation rates are found in the Neotropical Manilkara clade than in either African or Asian clades. Dating of regional diversification correlates with known palaeoclimatic events. In South America, the divergence between Atlantic coastal forest and Amazonian clades coincides with the formation of drier Cerrado and Caatinga habitats between them. In Africa diversification coincides with Tertiary cycles of aridification an duplif tof the east African plateaux. In South east Asia dispersal may have been limited by the relatively recent emergence of land in New Guinea and islands further east c.10 Mya.

  • 15.
    Balke, Michael
    et al.
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    A new genus and two new species of Southeast Asian Bidessini as well as new synonyms for Oceanian species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 647, 137-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rompindessus jenisi Balke, Bergsten & Hendrich, gen. n. et sp. n. is described from near Rompin village in West Malaysia. The new genus is characterized by the presence of an occipital line and basal pronotal striae, the presence of a thick anterior bead on clypeus and two-segmented parameres as well as by the absence of basal elytral striae, the absence of sutural line on elytron, the absence of basal epipleural transverse carina, and the absence of longitudinal elytral carina. Moreover, male pro- and mesotarsus appear stout, and distinctly dilated laterally; the pronotum is comparably long and parallel-sided and the colour of beetle conspicuous dark orange. Leiodytes kualalipis Balke, Wang, Bergsten & Hendrich, sp. n. is described from West Malaysia (Pahang) and South Vietnam (Cat Tien). It is well characterized by its large size, elongate body and the form of the median lobe. Limbodessus fijiensis (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), comb. n. described from Fiji is a new synonym of Limbodessus curviplicatus (Zimmermann, 1927) described from Samoa.

  • 16. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Gilenstam, Gunnar
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    The relationships of Odontotrema (Odontotremataceae) and the resurrected Sphaeropezia (Stictidaceae) - new combinations and three new Sphaeropezia species.2013In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 105, no 2, 384-397 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Baloch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Lücking, Robert
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    New combinations and names in Gyalecta for former Belonia and Pachyphiale (Ascomycota, Ostropales) species2013In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 45, no 6, 723-727 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luis F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Molecular systematics and evolution of the Synallaxis ruficapilla complex (Aves: Furnariidae) in the Atlantic Forest.2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 67, no 1, 86-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neotropical Synallaxis ruficapilla complex is endemic to the Atlantic Forest and is comprised of three species: S. ruficapilla, S. whitneyi, and S. infuscata. This group is closely related to the Synallaxis moesta complex that occurs in the Andes, Tepuis, and Guianan shield. Here we used mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to infer the phylogeny and the time of diversification of the S. ruficapilla and S. moesta complexes. We also included samples of an undescribed population of Synallaxis that resembles other populations of the S. ruficapilla complex. Our results showed that different geographical lineages within the S. ruficapilla complex are reciprocally monophyletic, but the northern form (S. infuscata) grouped with an Andean taxon. This suggests that at least two lineages of this group independently colonized the Atlantic Forest. Specimens of the undescribed population formed a monophyletic clade with deep divergence. Estimated diversification dates were within the late Pliocene to Pleistocene (2.75-0.16 million of years ago). This suggests that at this time there was a higher connectivity between habitats in the rugged landscapes of the circum-Amazonian bioregions. The observed Pleistocene diversification within the Atlantic Forest is congruent in space and time with studies of other co-distributed organisms, and may be associated with climate changes and tectonic activity during this period.

  • 19. Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    et al.
    Pessoa, Rodrigo O
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Silveira, Luís F
    Miyaki, Cristina Y
    Phylogeny and historical biogeography of gnateaters (Passeriformes, Conopophagidae) in the South America forests.2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, 422-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inferred the phylogenetic relationships, divergence time and biogeography of Conopophagidae (gnateaters) based on sequence data of mitochondrial genes (ND2, ND3 and cytb) and nuclear introns (TGFB2 and G3PDH) from 45 tissue samples (43 Conopophaga and 2 Pittasoma) representing all currently recognized species of the family and the majority of subspecies. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Divergence time estimates were obtained based on a Bayesian relaxed clock model. These chronograms were used to calculate diversification rates and reconstruct ancestral areas of the genus Conopophaga. The phylogenetic analyses support the reciprocal monophyly of the two genera, Conopophaga and Pittasoma. All species were monophyletic with the exception of C. lineata, as C. lineata cearae did not cluster with the other two C. lineata subspecies. Divergence time estimates for Conopophagidae suggested that diversification took place during the Neogene, and that the diversification rate within Conopophaga clade was highest in the late Miocene, followed by a slower diversification rate, suggesting a diversity-dependent pattern. Our analyses of the diversification of family Conopophagidae provided a scenario for evolution in Terra Firme forest across tropical South America. The spatio-temporal pattern suggests that Conopophaga originated in the Brazilian Shield and that a complex sequence of events possibly related to the Andean uplift and infilling of former sedimentation basins and erosion cycles shaped the current distribution and diversity of this genus.

  • 20.
    Beimforde, Christina
    et al.
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Feldberg, Kathrin
    Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU), Menzinger Str. 67, 80638 Munich, Germany.
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Rikkinen, Jouko
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Tuovila, Hanna
    Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Dörfelt, Heinrich
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Gube, Matthias
    Microbial Communication, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 25, 07743 Jena, Germany.
    Jackson, Daniel
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Reitner, Joachim
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Seyfullah, Leyla
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Schmidt, Alexander
    Courant Research Centre Geobiology, University of Göttingen, Goldschmidtstraße 3, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
    Estimating the Phanerozoic history of the Ascomycota lineages: Combining fossil and molecular data2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, no 78, 386-398 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylum Ascomycota is by far the largest group in the fungal kingdom. Ecologically important mutualisticassociations such as mycorrhizae and lichens have evolved in this group, which are regarded as keyinnovations that supported the evolution of land plants. Only a few attempts have been made to date theorigin of Ascomycota lineages by using molecular clock methods, which is primarily due to the lack ofsatisfactory fossil calibration data. For this reason we have evaluated all of the oldest available ascomycetefossils from amber (Albian to Miocene) and chert (Devonian and Maastrichtian). The fossils representfive major ascomycete classes (Coniocybomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Laboulbeniomycetes,and Lecanoromycetes). We have assembled a multi-gene data set (18SrDNA, 28SrDNA, RPB1 andRPB2) from a total of 145 taxa representing most groups of the Ascomycota and utilized fossil calibrationpoints solely from within the ascomycetes to estimate divergence times of Ascomycota lineages with aBayesian approach. Our results suggest an initial diversification of the Pezizomycotina in the Ordovician,followed by repeated splits of lineages throughout the Phanerozoic, and indicate that this continuousdiversification was unaffected by mass extinctions. We suggest that the ecological diversity within eachlineage ensured that at least some taxa of each group were able to survive global crises and rapidlyrecovered.

  • 21.
    Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Englund, Markus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pruski, John F.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Phylogeny of the Athroismeae (Asteraceae), with a new circumscription of the tribe2017In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 2, 408-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athroismeae is a small tribe of the Asteraceae-Asteroideae, the members of which show considerable variation in morphology. A molecular phylogenetic study of the tribe is presented for the first time, based on plastid (ndhF, trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF) and nuclear data (ETS, ITS). The phylogenetic relationships between the different genera within Athroismeae are discussed, and in addition, three unispecific genera: Anisochaeta, Artemisiopsis and Symphyllocarpus as well as Duhaldea (Inula) stuhlmannii, all earlier placed in other tribes, are here shown to belong within Athroismeae. Symphyllocarpus is sister to Centipeda and the earlier Symphyllocarpinae includes Centipedinae in synonymy. Furthermore, Cardosoa and Philyrophyllum are found to be integrated within Anisopappus and their generic status cannot be maintained. An outline of an amended circumscription of the Athroismeae is presented, with three new combinations and a description of the new subtribe Lowryanthinae.

  • 22. Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Karis, Per Ola
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Evolution and diversification related to rainfall regimes: diversification patterns in the South African genus Metalasia (Asteraceae-Gnaphalieae).2015In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 42, no 1, 121-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The Cape region is known for its exceptional species richness, although much remains unknown regarding the appearance of the modern Cape flora. One explanation is that floral diversification was influenced by the establishment of winter rainfall/summer arid conditions hypothesized to have occurred towards the end of the Miocene. We studied the evolution and diversification of the plant genus Metalasia (Asteraceae–Gnaphalieae), with the aim of testing whether radiation patterns may have been influenced by the climatic changes.

    Location. South Africa, with emphasis on the south-west.

    Methods. The radiation of Metalasia was investigated using two approaches: a species diffusion approach, which estimated the ancestral areas by means of a relaxed random walk while sampling from extant distributions; and a discrete approach, in which distributions were defined according to the phytogeographical centres of the Cape region. Secondarily derived clock rates from an earlier Gnaphalieae study were used for calibration purposes.

    Results. Our analyses date Metalasia to approximately 6.9 Ma, after the Miocene–Pliocene boundary and the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions. Metalasia consists of two sister clades: Clade A and Clade B. Clade B, which is endemic to the winter rainfall area, is estimated to have diversified c. 6.4 Ma, whereas Clade A, with a main distribution in the all-year rainfall area, is considerably younger, with a crown group age estimated to 3.3 Ma. Diversification rates suggest an early rapid speciation, with rates decreasing through time both for Metalasia and for clades A and B separately. Ancestral area estimations show a possible scenario for the radiation of Metalasia to its current diversity and distribution, with no conflict between results inferred from diffusion or discrete methods.

    Main conclusions. The diversification of Metalasia is estimated to have begun after the establishment of the winter rainfall/summer arid conditions, consistent with its radiation having been influenced by changes in the climatic regime.

  • 23.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A bee-fly's host, Facebook, and DNA Barcoding.2016In: Barcode Bulletin, Vol. 7, no 2, 8-9 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    DNA-streckkodning - så går det till2014In: Bi-lagan, no 1, 14-16 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nilsson, Lars G R
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Åkerjordfly, Agrotis exclamationis, identifierad som värdart för svävflugan Villa hottentotta med hjälp av DNA streckkodning (Diptera: Bombyliidae).2015In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 136, no 4, 121-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we identify Agrotis exclamationis (Linnaeus, 1758) as a host species for the bee y Villa hottentotta (Linnaeus, 1758) in Sweden. Host use and speci city for bee y species are generally very poorly known, why the hatching of a bee y of the genus Villa from an unknown Noctuid pupa caught our attention. The parasitized Noctuid pupa was found in a garden in Staffanstorp, Skåne (Sweden), in May 2015 and kept in a jar to hatch. The bee y hatched in June leaving two empty exuviae in the jar. DNA was extracted sepa- rately from both excuviae to identify the y and the host using DNA Barcoding. A 600+ bp long sequence of the gene Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 was sequenced for both samples and queried against the reference library BOLD (www.boldsystems.org). The Noctuid host pupa was unambiguously identi ed as the common Noctuid species Agrotis exclamationis. The sequence was identical to the most common haplotype over much of Europe. The bee y pupa was identi ed as Villa hottentotta, the most common Villa species in Sweden. This added a new Noctuid species to the list of known hosts for V. hottentotta which also includes several other Noctuid genera as well as a Geometrid moth. Belonging to the sand chamber group of bee ies where the female scatter the eggs on the ground while hovering, the active host-seeking rst instar planidium larvae bene ts from having a wide host range to potentially encounter in the substrate zone. 

  • 26.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Weingartner, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University.
    Hajek, Jiri
    Species delimitation of the Hyphydrus ovatus complex in western Palaearctic with an update of species distributions (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 678, 73-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The species status of Hyphydrus anatolicus Guignot, 1957 and H. sanctus Sharp, 1882, previously often confused with the widespread H. ovatus (Linnaeus, 1760), are tested with molecular and morphological characters. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) was sequenced for 32 specimens of all three species. Gene-trees were inferred with parsimony, time-free bayesian and strict clock bayesian analyses. The GMYC model was used to estimate species limits. All three species were reciprocally monophyletic with CO1 and highly supported. The GMYC species delimitation analysis unequivocally delimited the three species with no other than the three species solution included in the confidence interval. A likelihood ratio test rejected the one-species null model. Important morphological characters distinguishing the species are provided and illustrated. New distributional data are given for the following species: Hyphydrus anatolicus from Slovakia and Ukraine, and H. aubei Ganglbauer, 1891, and H. sanctus from Turkey.

  • 27. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species of Peschetius GUIGNOT described from Sri Lanka (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)2015In: Koleopterologische Rundschau, Vol. 85, 57-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peschetius taprobanicus sp.n. (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) is described on the basis of six specimens

    collected from Sri Lanka. Distinguishing characters are given for the new species.

  • 28. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Two new species of the megadiverse lentic diving-beetle genus Hydrovatus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae) described from NE Thailand.2016In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 632, 57-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we describe two new Hydrovatus species (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Hydrovatini) from the province of Khon Kaen, Isan region in NE Thailand. Hydrovatus is the third most species rich genus of diving beetles (Dytiscidae). It occurs on all continents except Antarctica and now numbers 210 currently recognized species. Both new species, Hydrovatus diversipunctatussp. n. and Hydrovatus globosussp. n., were collected at lights and are only known from the type locality "Khon Kaen" (a city and province). Diagnoses based on morphology for the separation from closely related species are given together with illustrations of male genitalia and habitus photos. We provide a determination key to Old World species of the pustulatus species group and to Oriental species of the oblongipennis species group.

  • 29. Biström, Olof
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders N
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic revision of Afrotropical Laccophilus Leach, 1815 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae).2015In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 542, 1-379 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The African species of the genus Laccophilus Leach, 1815, are revised, on the basis of study of adult specimens. In all, 105 species are now recognized. A phenetic character-analysis was undertaken, which resulted in a split of the genus into 17 species groups. Diagnoses and a description of each species are given together with keys for identification of species groups and species. We also provide habitus photos, illustration of male genitalia and distribution maps for all species. New species are described as follows: Laccophilus grossus sp. n. (Angola, Namibia), Laccophilus rocchii sp. n. (Tanzania, Namibia, Botswana, Mozambique), Laccophilus ferrugo sp. n. (Mozambique), Laccophilus furthi sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus isamberti sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus inobservatus sp. n. (Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Niger, Sudan, Chad, Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon, Zaire and Asia: Yemen), Laccophilus cryptos sp. n. (Zaire, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa), Laccophilus enigmaticus sp. n. (Nigeria, Sudan), Laccophilus bellus sp. n. (Benin, Nigeria), Laccophilus guentheri sp. n. (Guinea, Ghana), Laccophilus guineensis sp. n. (Guinea), Laccophilus decorosus sp. n. (Uganda), Laccophilus empheres sp. n. (Kenya), Laccophilus inconstans sp. n. (Guinea, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon), Laccophilus brancuccii sp. n. (Central African Republic), Laccophilus incomptus sp. n. (Cameroon), Laccophilus australis sp. n. (Tanzania, South Africa), Laccophilus minimus sp. n. (Namibia), Laccophilus eboris sp. n. (Ivory Coast), Laccophilus insularum sp. n. (Madagascar), Laccophilus occidentalis sp. n. (Gambia, Senegal, Mali, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Nigeria, Central African Republic, Zaire) and Laccophilus transversovittatus sp. n. (Madagascar). Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882, is restored as good species; not junior synonym of Laccophilus pictipennis Sharp, 1882. New synonyms are established as follows: Laccophilus continentalis Gschwendtner, 1935 = Laccophilus perplexus Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n., Laccophilus taeniolatus Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus congener Omer-Cooper, 1957, syn. n., Laccophilus adspersus Boheman, 1848 = Laccophilus vitshumbii Guignot, 1959, syn. n. = Laccophilus adspersus nigeriensis Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n. = Laccophilus adspersus sudanensis Omer-Cooper, 1970, syn. n., Laccophilus modestus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus espanyoli Hernando, 1990, syn. n., Laccophilus flaveolus Régimbart, 1906 = Laccophilus pampinatus Guignot, 1941, syn. n., Laccophilus trilineola Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus simulator Omer-Cooper, 1958, syn. n., Laccophilus mediocris Guignot, 1952 = Laccophilus meii Rocchi, 2000, syn. n., Laccophilus epinephes Guignot, 1955 = Laccophilus castaneus Guignot, 1956, syn. n., Laccophilus saegeri Guignot, 1958 = Laccophilus comoensis Pederzani & Reintjes, 2002, syn. n., Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882 = Laccophilus evanescens Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., Laccophilus incrassatus Gschwendtner, 1933 = Laccophilus virgatus Guignot, 1953, syn. n., Laccophilus cyclopis Sharp, 1882 = Laccophilus shephardi Omer-Cooper, 1965, syn. n., Laccophilus burgeoni Gschwendtner, 1930 = Laccophilus wittei Guignot, 1952, syn. n., Laccophilus secundus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus torquatus Guignot, 1956, syn. n., Laccophilus desintegratus Régimbart, 1895 = Laccophilus sanguinosus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n. and Laccophilus flavopictus Régimbart, 1889 = Laccophilus bergeri Guignot, 1953, syn. n. = Laccophilus segmentatus Omer-Cooper, 1957, syn. n. Lectotypes are designated for the following taxa: Laccophilus productus Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus ruficollis Zimmermann, 1919, Laccophilus sordidus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus alluaudi Régimbart, 1899, Laccophilus pictipennis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus wehnckei Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus continentalis Gschwendtner, 1935, Laccophilus simplicistriatus Gschwendtner, 1932, Laccophilus complicatus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus rivulosus Klug, 1833, Laccophilus ampliatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus pilitarsis Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus adspersus Boheman, 1848, Laccophilus livens Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus modestus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus nodieri Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus flaveolus Régimbart, 1906, Laccophilus pallescens Régimbart, 1903, Laccophilus restrictus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus vermiculosus Gerstaecker, 1867, Laccophilus mocquerysi Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus bizonatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus tschoffeni Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus persimilis Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus poecilus Klug, 1834, Laccophilus lateralis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus lateralis var. polygrammus Régimbart, 1903, Laccophilus cyclopis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus shephardi Omer-Cooper, 1965, Laccophilus conjunctus Guignot, 1950, Laccophilus grammicus Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus flavoscriptus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus flavosignatus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus brevicollis Sharp, 1882, Laccophilus secundus Régimbart, Laccophilus desintegratus Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus gutticollis Régimbart, 1895, Laccophilus luctuosus Sharp, 1882 and Laccophilus inornatus Zimmermann, 1926. Laccophilus remex Guignot, 1952, comprises a species complex with uncertain taxonomic delimitation; the complex includes Laccophilus concisus Guignot, 1953, Laccophilus turneri Omer-Cooper, 1957 and Laccophilus praeteritus Omer-Cooper, 1957, as tentative synonyms of Laccophilus remex Guignot, 1952.

  • 30.
    Britzke, Ricardo
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Oliveira, Claudio
    Universidade Estadual Paulista.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apistogramma ortegai (Teleostei: Cichlidae), a new species of cichlid fish from the Ampyiacu River in the Peruvian Amazon basin2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 4, 409-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apistogramma ortegai, new species, is described from small streams tributaries of the Ampiyacu River near Pebas, in easternPeru. It belongs to the Apistogramma regani species group and is distinguished from all other species of Apistogrammaby the combination of contiguous caudal spot to bar 7, presence of abdominal stripes, short dorsal-fin lappets in both sexes,absence of vertical stripes on the caudal fin, and reduced number of predorsal and prepelvic scales.

  • 31. Buchbender, Volker
    et al.
    Hespanhol, Helena
    Krug, Michael
    Sérgio, Cecília
    Séneca, Ana
    Maul, Karola
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Phylogenetic reconstructions of the Hedwigiaceae reveal cryptic speciation and hybridisation in Hedwigia2014In: Bryophyte Diversity and Evolution, ISSN 2381-9677, Vol. 36, 1-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bukontaite, Rasa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The utility of CAD in recovering Gondwanan vicariance events and the evolutionary history of Aciliini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).2014In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 14, no 5, 1-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Aciliini presently includes 69 species of medium-sized water beetles distributed on all continents except Antarctica. The pattern of distribution with several genera confined to different continents of the Southern Hemisphere raises the yet untested hypothesis of a Gondwana vicariance origin. The monophyly of Aciliini has been questioned with regard to Eretini, and there are competing hypotheses about the intergeneric relationship in the tribe. This study is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis focused on the tribe Aciliini and it is based on eight gene fragments. The aims of the present study are: 1) to test the monophyly of Aciliini and clarify the position of the tribe Eretini and to resolve the relationship among genera within Aciliini, 2) to calibrate the divergence times within Aciliini and test different biogeographical scenarios, and 3) to evaluate the utility of the gene CAD for phylogenetic analysis in Dytiscidae.

    Results

    Our analyses confirm monophyly of Aciliini with Eretini as its sister group. Each of six genera which have multiple species are also supported as monophyletic. The origin of the tribe is firmly based in the Southern Hemisphere with the arrangement of Neotropical and Afrotropical taxa as the most basal clades suggesting a Gondwana vicariance origin. However, the uncertainty as to whether a fossil can be used as a stem-or crowngroup calibration point for Acilius influenced the result: as crowngroup calibration, the 95% HPD interval for the basal nodes included the geological age estimate for the Gondwana break-up, but as a stem group calibration the basal nodes were too young. Our study suggests CAD to be the most informative marker between 15 and 50 Ma. Notably, the 2000 bp CAD fragment analyzed alone fully resolved the tree with high support.

    Conclusions

    1) Molecular data confirmed Aciliini as a monophyletic group. 2) Bayesian optimizations of the biogeographical history are consistent with an influence of Gondwana break-up history, but were dependent on the calibration method. 3) The evaluation using a method of phylogenetic signal per base pair indicated Wnt and CAD as the most informative of our sampled genes.

  • 33. Büdel, B.
    et al.
    Colesie, C.
    Green, T.G.A.
    Grube, Martin
    Lázaro Suau, R.
    Loewen-Schneider, K.
    Maier, S.
    Peer, T.
    Pintado, A.
    Raggio, J.
    Ruprecht, U.
    Sancho, L. G.
    Schroeter, B.
    Türk, R.
    Weber, B.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Williams, L.
    Zheng, L.
    Improved appreciation of the functioning and importance of biological soil crusts in Europe – the Soil Crust International project (SCIN)2014In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 23, 1639-1658 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Cannon, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Kocot, Kevin
    University of Queensland.
    Waits, Damien
    Auburn University.
    Weese, David
    Georgia College and State University.
    Swalla, Billie
    University of Washington.
    Santos, Scott
    Auburn University.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University.
    Phylogenomic Resolution of the Hemichordate and Echinoderm Clade2014In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 24, 2827-2832 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambulacraria, comprising Hemichordata and Echinodermata, is closely related to Chordata, making it integral to understanding chordate origins and polarizing chordate molecular and morphological characters. Unfortunately, relationships within Hemichordata and Echinoder- mata have remained unresolved, compromising our ability to extrapolate findings from the most closely related molecular and developmental models outside of Chordata (e.g., the acorn worms Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava and the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). To resolve long-standing phylogenetic issues within Ambulacraria, we sequenced transcriptomes for 14 hemichordates as well as 8 echinoderms and complemented these with existing data for a total of 33 ambulacrarian operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Examination of leaf stability values revealed rhabdopleurid pterobranchs and the enteropneust Stereobalanus canadensis were unstable in placement; therefore, analyses were also run without these taxa. Analyses of 185 genes resulted in reciprocal monophyly of Enteropneusta and Pterobranchia, placed the deep-sea family Torquaratoridae within Ptychoderidae, and confirmed the position of ophiuroid brittle stars as sister to asteroid sea stars (the Asterozoa hypothesis). These results are consistent with earlier perspectives concerning plesiomorphies of Ambulacraria, including pharyngeal gill slits, a single axocoel, and paired hydrocoels and somatocoels. The resolved ambulacrarian phylogeny will help clarify the early evolution of chordate characteristics and has implications for our understanding of major fossil groups, including graptolites and somasteroideans. 

  • 35. Cappellini, Enrico
    et al.
    Gentry, Anthea
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Ishida, Yasuko
    Cram, David
    Roos, Anna-Marie
    Watson, Mick
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Agnelli, Paolo
    Barbagli, Fausto
    Littlewood, D. Tim. J.
    Kelstrup, Christian D.
    Olsen, Jesper V.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Roca, Alfred L.
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Resolution of the type material of the Asian elephant, Elephas maximus Linnaeus, 1758 (Proboscidea, Elephantidae)2014In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 170, 222-232 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Crous, P.W.
    et al.
    Quaedvlieg, W
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Hawksworth, D.L.
    Groenwald, J.Z.
    Phacidium and Ceuthospora (Phacidiaceae) are congeneric: taxonomic and nomenclatural implications2014In: IMA Fungus, ISSN 2210-6340, E-ISSN 2210-6359, Vol. 5, no 2, 173-193 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. de Faria, Aparecida Donisete
    et al.
    Pirani, Jóse Rubens
    Lahoz da Silva Ribeiro, José E.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Terra-Araujo, Mário H.
    Vieira, Pedro P.
    Swenson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Towards a natural classification of Sapotaceae subfamily Chrysophylloideae in the Neotropics2017In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 185, 27-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generic limits of Chrysophyllum and Pouteria (Chrysophylloideae, Sapotaceae) have been found to be untenable. We here search for natural lineages in Neotropical Chrysophylloideae by sampling 101 terminals for molecular sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (external and internal transcribed spacer), the nuclear gene RPB2 and 17 morphological characters. Data were analysed with Bayesian inference and parsimony jackknifing. Morphological traits were finally optimized onto the tree to identify the most coherent characters. The resulting phylogenetic tree suggests that the limits of the well-known genera Chrysophyllum and Pouteria must be amended. Diploon, Ecclinusa and Elaeoluma can be maintained and Chrysophyllum sections Ragala section Prieurella and the satellite gen- era Achrouteria, Cornuella, Martiusella and Nemaluma merit generic resurrection. Lucuma may be restored if the type species belongs to the clade. The accepted genera Chromolucuma, Pradosia and Sarcaulus gain strong clade support, but are embedded in a core clade of Pouteria and may be relegated to the subgeneric level if morphologi- cal studies cannot provide evidence concurring with narrow generic concepts. Circumscriptions of Micropholis and Chrysophyllum sections Chrysophyllum and Villocuspis remain unclear and must be explored by using an extended taxon sampling. We predict that yet-to-be-analysed species of Pouteria sections Franchetella, Gayella, Oxythece and Pouteria and members of the currently accepted genera Chromolucuma, Pradosia and Sarcaulus will fall inside the core clade of Pouteria when analysed. 

  • 38.
    de Sousa, Filipe
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bertrand, Yann J. K.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nylinder, Nylinder
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Oxelman, Bengt
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jonna S.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pfeil, Bernard E.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Phylogenetic Properties of 50 Nuclear Loci in Medicago (Leguminosae) Generated Using Multiplexed Sequence Capture and Next-Generation Sequencing2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Next-generation sequencing technology has increased the capacity to generate molecular data for plant biological research,including phylogenetics, and can potentially contribute to resolving complex phylogenetic problems. The evolutionaryhistory of Medicago L. (Leguminosae: Trifoliae) remains unresolved due to incongruence between published phylogenies.Identification of the processes causing this genealogical incongruence is essential for the inference of a correct speciesphylogeny of the genus and requires that more molecular data, preferably from low-copy nuclear genes, are obtainedacross different species. Here we report the development of 50 novel LCN markers in Medicago and assess the phylogeneticproperties of each marker. We used the genomic resources available for Medicago truncatula Gaertn., hybridisation-basedgene enrichment (sequence capture) techniques and Next-Generation Sequencing to generate sequences. This alternativeproves to be a cost-effective approach to amplicon sequencing in phylogenetic studies at the genus or tribe level andallows for an increase in number and size of targeted loci. Substitution rate estimates for each of the 50 loci are provided,and an overview of the variation in substitution rates among a large number of low-copy nuclear genes in plants ispresented for the first time. Aligned sequences of major species lineages of Medicago and its sister genus are made availableand can be used in further probe development for sequence-capture of the same markers.

  • 39.
    Deprá, Gabriel C.
    et al.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pavanelli, Carla S,
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    da Graça, Wefterson J.
    Universidade Estadual de Maringá.
    A new colorful species of Geophagus (Teleostei: Cichlidae), endemic to the rio Aripuanã in the Amazon basin of Brazil2014In: Neotropical Ichthyology, ISSN 1679-6225, E-ISSN 1982-0224, Vol. 12, no 4, 737-746 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geophagus mirabilis, new species, is endemic to the rio Aripuanã drainage upstream from Dardanelos/Andorinhas falls.The new species is distinguished from all other species of the genus by the presence of one to five large black spots arrangedlongitudinally along the middle of the flank, in addition to the black midlateral spot that is characteristic of species in thegenus and by a pattern of iridescent spots and lines on the head in living specimens. It is further distinguished from allcongeneric species, except G. camopiensis and G. crocatus, by the presence of seven (vs. eight or more) scale rows in thecircumpeduncular series below the lateral line (7 in G. crocatus; 7-9 in G. camopiensis). Including the new species, five cichlids and 11 fish species in total are known only from the upper rio Aripuanã, and 15 fish species in total are known only from the rio Aripuanã drainage

  • 40. Dickinson, Edward C
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Systematic notes on Asian birds 32: The type locality of Hirundo daurica Laxmann, 17692002In: Zoologische Verhandelingen Leiden, ISSN 0024-1652, Vol. 340, 205-206 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The restricted type locality suggested by Brooke (1974) for Hirundo daurica Laxmann, 1769 was apparently made without a translation of the original Swedish description. With this in hand we find it necessary to correct that restriction and move the type locality some 2500 km west.

  • 41. Dickinson, Edward C.
    et al.
    Schodde, Richard
    Australian Biological Resources Study.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chrochet, Pierre André
    Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive.
    Elliott, Andy
    Lynx Edicions.
    Kirwan, Guy M
    Field Museum of Natural History.
    Correcting the "correct" name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher (Aves: Passeriformes, Muscicapidae, Muscicapa)2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3869, no 3, 343-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Muscicapa dauurica Pallas, 1811 is shown to be an available name and the oldest available name for the Asian Brown Flycatcher

  • 42. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella umbilicariae (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota), a new lichenicolous species on Umbilicaria from Peru2015In: Bulletin de la Société des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, Vol. 115, 167-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Diederich, P.
    et al.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tremella umbilicariae (Tremellomycetes, Basidiomycota), a new lichenicolous species on Umbilicaria from Peru2014In: Bulletin de la Société des Naturalistes Luxembourgeois, Vol. 115, 167-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Divakar, Pradeep K.
    et al.
    Crespo, Ana
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Evolution of complex symbiotic relationships in a morphologically derived family of lichen-forming fungi2015In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 208, 1217-1226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcello A.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    An Eocene orthocone from Antarctica shows convergent evolution of internally shelled cephalopods.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, 1-20 p., e0172169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Subclass Coleoidea (Class Cephalopoda) accommodates the diverse present-day internally shelled cephalopod mollusks (Spirula, Sepia and octopuses, squids, Vampyroteuthis) and also extinct internally shelled cephalopods. Recent Spirula represents a unique coleoid retaining shell structures, a narrow marginal siphuncle and globular protoconch that signify the ancestry of the subclass Coleoidea from the Paleozoic subclass Bactritoidea. This hypothesis has been recently supported by newly recorded diverse bactritoid-like coleoids from the Carboniferous of the USA, but prior to this study no fossil cephalopod indicative of an endochochleate branch with an origin independent from subclass Bactritoidea has been reported.

    Methodology/Principal findings

    Two orthoconic conchs were recovered from the Early Eocene of Seymour Island at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. They have loosely mineralized organic-rich chitincompatible microlaminated shell walls and broadly expanded central siphuncles. The morphological, ultrustructural and chemical data were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant and extinct taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS).

    Conclusions/Significance

    Our study presents the first evidence for an evolutionary lineage of internally shelled cephalopods with independent origin from Bactritoidea/Coleoidea, indicating convergent evolution with the subclass Coleoidea. A new subclass Paracoleoidea Doguzhaeva n. subcl. is established for accommodation of orthoconic cephalopods with the internal shell associated with a broadly expanded central siphuncle. Antarcticerida Doguzhaeva n. ord., Antarcticeratidae Doguzhaeva n. fam., Antarcticeras nordenskjoeldi Doguzhaeva n. gen., n. sp. are described within the subclass Paracoleoidea. The analysis of organic-rich shell preservation of A. nordenskjoeldi by use of SEM/EDS techniques revealed fossilization of hyposeptal cameral soft tissues. This suggests that a depositional environment favoring soft-tissue preservation was the factor enabling conservation of the weakly mineralized shell of A. nordenskjoeldi.

  • 46. Draper, Isabel
    et al.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Stech, Michael
    Patiño, Jairo
    Werner, Olaf
    González-Mancebo, J. M.
    Sim-Sim, Manuela
    Lopes, Tina
    Ros, Rosa María
    How many species of Isothecium(Lembophyllaceae, Bryophyta) are there in Macaronesia? A survey usingintegrative taxonomy2015In: Botanical journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4074, E-ISSN 1095-8339, Vol. 177, 418-438 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Drovetski, Sergei V.
    et al.
    Zink, Robert M.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fadeev, Igor V.
    A multilocus study of pine grosbeak phylogeography supports the pattern of greater intercontinental divergence in Holarctic boreal forest birds than in birds inhabiting other high-latitude habitats2010In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 37, no 4, 696-706 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Ekman, Jan
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Out of Gondwanaland; the evolutionary history of cooperative breeding and social behaviour among crows, magpies, jays and allies.2006In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 273, no 1590, 1117-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperative breeding is comparatively rare among birds in the mainly temperate and boreal Northern Hemisphere. Here we test if the distribution of breeding systems reflects a response to latitude by means of a phylogenetic analysis using correlates with geographical range among the corvids (crows, jays, magpies and allied groups). The corvids trace their ancestry to the predominantly cooperative 'Corvida' branch of oscine passerines from the Australo-Papuan region on the ancient Gondwanaland supercontinent, but we could not confirm the ancestral state of the breeding system within the family, while family cohesion may be ancestral. Initial diversification among pair-breeding taxa that are basal in the corvid phylogeny, represented by genera such as Pyrrhocorax and Dendrocitta, indicates that the corvid family in its current form could have evolved from pair-breeding ancestors only after they had escaped the Australo-Papuan shield. Within the family, cooperative breeding (alloparental care/family cohesion) is strongly correlated to latitude and its predominance in species maintaining a southerly distribution indicates a secondary evolution of cooperative breeding in the lineage leading away from the basal corvids. Multiple transitions show plasticity in the breeding system, indicating a response to latitude rather than evolutionary inertia. The evolutionary background to the loss of cooperative breeding among species with a northerly distribution is complex and differs between species, indicating a response to a variety of selection forces. Family cohesion where the offspring provide alloparental care is a main route to cooperatively breeding groups among corvids. Some corvid species lost only alloparental care, while maintaining coherent family groups. Other species lost family cohesion and, as a corollary, they also lost the behaviour where retained offspring provide alloparental care.

  • 49. Ekman, Stefan
    et al.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Lindblom, Louise
    Jørgensen, Per M.
    Extended phylogeny and a revised generic classification of the Pannariaceae (Peltigerales, Ascomycota)2014In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 46, 627-656 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Englund, Markus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Konsten att göra en höna av en fjäder: DNA-streckkoder i praktiken2014In: Bi-lagan, ISSN 2000-8139, Vol. 1, 17-18 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Med hjälp av korta artspecifika delar av DNA:t, så kallade DNA-streckkoder, är det möjligt att artbestämma till exempel en fågel utifrån bara en fjäder. I och med att tekniken blivit både enklare och billigare har tiden nu blivit mogen för att introducera DNA-streckkoder i skolundervisningen.

1234567 1 - 50 of 322
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