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  • 1. Chiarle, Alberto
    et al.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för zoologi.
    Isaia, Marco
    Courtship behavior in European species of the genus Pardosa (Araneae, Lycosidae)2013Ingår i: Journal of Arachnology, ISSN 0161-8202, Vol. 41, nr 2, s. 108-125Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Owen, Kylie
    et al.
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för miljöforskning och övervakning. Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Saeki, Kentaro
    Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto.
    Warren, Joseph
    School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University.
    Bocconcelli, Alessandro
    Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Wiley, David
    Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, NOAA National Ocean Service.
    Ohira, Shin-Ichi
    Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University.
    Bombosch, Annette
    Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Toda, Kei
    Department of Chemistry, Kumamoto University.
    Zitterbart, Daniel
    Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    Natural dimethyl sulfide gradients would lead marine predators to higher prey biomass2021Ingår i: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 4, artikel-id 149Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding prey is essential to survival, with marine predators hypothesised to track chemicals such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) while foraging. Many predators are attracted to artificially released DMS, and laboratory experiments have shown that zooplankton grazing on phytoplankton accelerates DMS release. However, whether natural DMS concentrations are useful for predators and correlated to areas of high prey biomass remains a fundamental knowledge gap. Here, we used concurrent hydroacoustic surveys and in situ DMS measurements to present evidence that zooplankton biomass is spatially correlated to natural DMS concentration in air and seawater. Using agent simulations, we also show that following gradients of DMS would lead zooplankton predators to areas of higher prey biomass than swimming randomly. Further understanding of the conditions and scales over which these gradients occur, and how they are used by predators, is essential to predicting the impact of future changes in the ocean on predator foraging success.

  • 3. Pirotta, Vanessa
    et al.
    Owen, Kylie
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för miljöforskning och övervakning.
    Donnelly, David
    Brasier, Madeleine
    Harcourt, Rob
    First evidence of bubble-net feeding and the formation of ‘super-groups’ by the east Australian population of humpback whales during their southward migration2021Ingår i: Aquatic conservation, ISSN 1052-7613, E-ISSN 1099-0755, s. 1-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The recovery of overexploited populations is likely to reveal behaviours that may have been present prior to harvest but are only now reappearing as the population size increases. The east Australian humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) population (group V, stock E1) has recovered well from past exploitation and is now estimated to be close to the pre-whaling population size.Humpback whales were thought to follow a ‘feast and famine’ model historically, feeding intensively in high-latitude feeding grounds and then fasting while migrating and in calving grounds; however, there is growing evidence that animals may feed outside of known foraging grounds.This short article reports on the first photographically documented evidence of bubble-net feeding by humpback whales in Australian coastal waters (n = 10 groups observed) and provides the first evidence of a second site in the southern hemisphere for the formation of ‘super-groups’ (n = 6 super-groups at discrete locations).The formation of super-groups may be linked to changes in the type or density of prey available, either along the migratory route or in the feeding grounds of the previous summer. It is also possible that the increased population size following recovery make large group sizes while feeding more common. These findings strongly support evidence that feeding behaviour is not restricted to high-latitude foraging grounds in the Southern Ocean, and that prey consumption prior to leaving the coastal waters of Australia may be a significant component of the migratory ecology of this population.Understanding how environmental variation influences the extent to which humpback whales depend on foraging opportunities along their migratory route, and where feeding occurs, will help to predict how future changes in the ocean will influence whale populations. This will also allow for more effective management measures to reduce the impact of threats during this important period of energy consumption.

  • 4.
    Selbmann, Anna
    et al.
    Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Iceland Reykjavík Iceland.
    Deecke, Volker B.
    Institute of Science and Environment, University of Cumbria Ambleside UK.
    Filatova, Olga A.
    Department of Biology University of Southern Denmark Odense Denmark.
    Fedutin, Ivan D.
    Department of Biology University of Southern Denmark Odense Denmark.
    Miller, Patrick J. O.
    Sea Mammal Research Unit School of Biology, University of St Andrews St Andrews UK.
    Simon, Malene
    Greenland Climate Research Centre, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Nuuk Greenland.
    Bowles, Ann E.
    Hubbs‐SeaWorld Research Institute San Diego California.
    Lyrholm, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för bioinformatik och genetik. Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Lacey, Claire
    Song of the Whale research team, Marine Conservation Research International Kelvedon UK.
    Magnúsdóttir, Edda E.
    Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Iceland Reykjavík Iceland.
    Maunder, William
    Cardiff University Cardiff UK.
    Wensveen, Paul J.
    Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Iceland Reykjavík Iceland.
    Svavarsson, Jörundur
    Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Iceland Reykjavík Iceland.
    Samarra, Filipa I. P.
    University of Iceland's Institute of Research Centres Vestmannaeyjar Iceland.
    Call type repertoire of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Iceland and its variation across regions2023Ingår i: Marine mammal science, ISSN 0824-0469, E-ISSN 1748-7692, Vol. 39, nr 4, s. 1136-1160Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) have group-specific call repertoires that can be used to track groups and populations using passive acoustic monitoring. To provide a detailed description of the Icelandic killer whale repertoire and its variation, we analyzed acoustic data collected in five locations between 1985 and 2016. Calls were classified manually, and CART and random forest analyses were employed to validate the manual classification. A total of 91 call categories (including call types and subtypes) were defined. Most call categories were recorded in more than one location, with the highest proportion shared between herring grounds in Vestmannaeyjar (South) and Breiðafjörður (West). However, both locations included call categories that were not recorded elsewhere in Iceland. Recordings from past herring wintering grounds in eastern Iceland included few call categories that matched other locations. Sample sizes from Reykjanes (Southwest) and Skjálfandi (North) were small and did not include unique call categories. The relative occurrence of call categories in Vestmannaeyjar changed little over a 14-year period (2002–2016), although shorter-term changes between years were observed that appeared to correlate to changes in individuals identified. This comparison of acoustic repertoires provides valuable information on the social structure and movement patterns of herring-eating killer whales around Iceland.

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