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  • 1. Ameen, Carly
    et al.
    Feuerborn, Tatiana R.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Brown, Sarah K.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Hulme-Beaman, Ardern
    Lebrasseur, Ophelie
    Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.
    Lounsberry, Zachary T.
    Lin, Audrey T.
    Appelt, Martin
    Bachmann, Lutz
    Betts, Matthew
    Britton, Kate
    Darwent, John
    Dietz, Rune
    Fredholm, Merete
    Gopalakrishnan, Shyam
    Goriunova, Olga I.
    Gronnow, Bjarne
    Haile, James
    Hallsson, Jon Hallsteinn
    Harrison, Ramona
    Heide-Jorgensen, Mads Peter
    Knecht, Rick
    Losey, Robert J.
    Masson-MacLean, Edouard
    McGovern, Thomas H.
    McManus-Fry, Ellen
    Meldgaard, Morten
    Midtdal, Aslaug
    Moss, Madonna L.
    Nikitin, Iurii G.
    Nomokonova, Tatiana
    Palsdottir, Albina Hulda
    Perri, Angela
    Popov, Aleksandr N.
    Rankin, Lisa
    Reuther, Joshua D.
    Sablin, Mikhail
    Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth
    Shirar, Scott
    Smiarowski, Konrad
    Sonne, Christian
    Stiner, Mary C.
    Vasyukov, Mitya
    West, Catherine F.
    Ween, Gro Birgit
    Wennerberg, Sanne Eline
    Wiig, Oystein
    Woollett, James
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Hansen, Anders J.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Sacks, Benjamin N.
    Frantz, Laurent
    Larson, Greger
    Dobney, Keith
    Darwent, Christyann M.
    Evin, Allowen
    Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic2019In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1916, article id 20191929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic dogs have been central to life in the North American Arctic for millennia. The ancestors of the Inuit were the first to introduce the widespread usage of dog sledge transportation technology to the Americas, but whether the Inuit adopted local Palaeo-Inuit dogs or introduced a new dog population to the region remains unknown. To test these hypotheses, we generated mitochondrial DNA and geometric morphometric data of skull and dental elements from a total of 922 North American Arctic dogs and wolves spanning over 4500 years. Our analyses revealed that dogs from Inuit sites dating from 2000 BP possess morphological and genetic signatures that distinguish them from earlier Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and identified a novel mitochondrial clade in eastern Siberia and Alaska. The genetic legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in modern Arctic sledge dogs despite phenotypic differences between archaeological and modern Arctic dogs. Together, our data reveal that Inuit dogs derive from a secondary pre-contact migration of dogs distinct from Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and probably aided the Inuit expansion across the North American Arctic beginning around 1000 BP.

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  • 2.
    Bellucci, Jeremy
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pb Isotopic Composition of Panamanian Colonial Majolica by LA-ICP-MS2016In: Recent Advances in Laser Ablation ICP-MS for Archaeology / [ed] L. Dussubieux, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Panama ́ Viejo, founded in 1519 by the Spanish explorer Pedrarias Da ́vila, was the first permanent European settlement on the Pacific Ocean, and became a city, by royal decree, in 1521. Shortly after its creation, the city became an important base for trade with Spain. In 1671, the English pirate Henry Morgan waged an attack on Panama ́ Viejo, which resulted in a fire that destroyed the entire city. A new settlement built a few miles west, called Casco Antiguo or San Felipe, is now the historic district of modern Panama City. The Pb isotopic compositions of the glazes on the surface of sixteenth to seventeenth century majolica pottery sherds from Panama Viejo and Casco Antiguo (both in Panama), and Lima (Peru) were determined via non-destructive laser ablation multi-collector ICP-MS (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The contrast in Pb isotopic compositions in the glazes on ceramics recovered in different locations demonstrate that early majolica pottery production during this period used Pb obtained from the Andes. However, the Pb used in later majolica production in Panama is of Spanish origin. After Panama ́ Viejo was burned to the ground, Panamanian majolica production ended.

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  • 3. Bergh, Stefan
    et al.
    Blidmo, Roger
    Carlsson, Anders
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Olsson, Eva
    Åkerlund, Agneta
    Sörmländsk stenåldersforskning1987Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Ahlström, Torbjörn
    Kielman-Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Kjällquist, Mathilda
    Larsson, Lars
    Assessing laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a tool to study archaeological and modern human mobility through strontium isotope analyses of tooth enamel2022In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Kielman-Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Robson, Harry K.
    Mesolithic Scandinavian foraging patterns and hunting grounds targeted through laser ablation derived 87Sr/86Sr ratios at the Early-Mid Holocene site of Huseby Klev on the west coast of Sweden2022In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 293, p. 107697-107697, article id 107697Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Kjällquist, Mathilda
    Kielman-Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ahlström, Torbjörn
    Larsson, Lars
    Diachronic forager mobility: untangling the Stone Age movement patterns at the sites Norje Sunnansund, Skateholm and Västerbjers through strontium isotope ratio analysis by laser ablation2022In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 14, no 9, article id 176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Kjällquist, Mathilda
    Kielman-Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ahlström, Torbjörn
    Larsson, Lars
    Early Holocene Scandinavian foragers on a journey to affluence: Mesolithic fish exploitation, seasonal abundance and storage investigated through strontium isotope ratios by laser ablation (LA‐MC-ICP‐MS)2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 1, p. e0245222-e0245222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Bohlin, Erland
    et al.
    Hallgren, Susanne
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Unikt skolmuseum i Örebro hotat2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 10 september, p. Kultur 24-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9. Chenhall, R
    et al.
    Martinelli, L
    McLaughlin, J
    Paulsen, B S
    Senior, K
    Svalastog, A L
    Tunon, H
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Culture, science and bioethics - Interdisciplinary understandings of and practices in science, culture and ethics2014In: New Zealand Online Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, Vol. 1, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    ELLIOTT, MARINA
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University.
    MAKHUBELA, TEBOGO
    Department of Geology, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg.
    BROPHY, JULIET
    Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA;.
    CHURCHILL, STEVEN
    Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Box 90383, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
    PEIXOTTO, BECCA
    Center for the Exploration of the Human Journey, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Dallas, TX 75201, USA.
    FEUERRIEGEL, ELEN
    Primate Evolutionary Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Anthropology, Box 353100, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-3100, USA.
    MORRIS, HANNAH
    ICON & Warnell School of Forestry, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.
    VAN ROOYEN, DIRK
    Centre for the Exploration of the Deep Human Journey, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, SOUTH AFRICA.
    RAMALEPA, MAROPENG
    Centre for the Exploration of the Deep Human Journey, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, SOUTH AFRICA.
    TSIKOANE, MATHABELA
    Centre for the Exploration of the Deep Human Journey, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, SOUTH AFRICA.
    KRUGER, ASHLEY
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    SPANDLER, CARL
    Department of Geoscience, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, AUSTRALIA; carl.spandler@jcu.edu.au.
    KRAMERS, JAN
    Department of Geology, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park, 206, SOUTH AFRICA.
    ROBERTS, ERIC
    Department of Geoscience, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, AUSTRALIA.
    DIRKS, PAUL
    Department of Geoscience, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, AUSTRALIA.
    HAWKS, JOHN
    Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53593, USA.
    BERGER, LEE
    Centre for the Exploration of the Deep Human Journey, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, SOUTH AFRICA.
    Expanded Explorations of the Dinaledi Subsystem,Rising Star Cave System, South Africa2021In: PaleoAnthropology, E-ISSN 1545-0031, Vol. 2021, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system has yielded a large assemblage of fossil hominin material, attributed to Homo naledi. The unusual taphonomic and geological situation of the assemblage suggested that the remains may have been deliberately deposited in the chamber. However, the route and mechanism of deposition of the remains within the Dinaledi Chamber are still uncertain. During the 2017—2018 field seasons, we expanded explorations of the passages surrounding the Dinaledi Chamber. These explorations improved our understandingof the cave’s spatial complexity, necessitating a revision of the way the spaces are named and described. The work supported the hypothesis that there is no alternate entrance into the system other than the Chute. The work also identified new fossil deposits in several remote passages, three of which contain material attributable to H. naledi. Here, we clarify the definition of the Dinaledi Subsystem and provide terminology for new fossil localities found in this portion of the Rising Star cave system. These results emphasize the complex depositional environment of the Dinaledi Subsystem and raise new questions about the process and timing of the fossil accumulations.

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  • 11.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Bosättning i Birka - animalieproduktion och konsumtion1987In: Meta: Medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, no 3, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 12.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Det osteologiska materialet1994In: Arkeologiska massfynd / [ed] Modig, A., Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 1994, p. 44-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 13.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Exploitation of seabirds in central Sweden during late Iron Age1987In: Theoretical Approaches to Artefacts, Settlement and Society: Studies in honour of Mats P. Malmer / [ed] Burenhult, G., Carlsson, A., Hyenstrand, Å. & Sjøvold, T, Oxford, 1987, p. 445-453Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjäderfä och vildfågel - osteologisk analys av fågelben1991In: Bryggaren - ett kvarter i centrum / [ed] Carlsson, R., Elfwendahl, M. & Perming, A., Riksantikvarieämbetet, 1991, p. 207-219Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Förändringar av Östersjöfiskets betydelse för befolkningen i Mälardalen under sen järnålder och medeltid1989In: Avstamp - för en ny Sigtunaforskning: 18 forskare om Sigtuna, heldagseminarium kring Sigtunaforskning den 26 november 1987, Gröna Ladan, Sigtuna / [ed] Tesch, S., Sigtuna: Sigtuna Museer , 1989, p. 31-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Interpretations of Archaeological Bird Remains - a Taphonomic Approach1987In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 65-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Osteological analysis of faunal remains from Kolsvidja, Sund parish, Åland province, Finland1989In: Finskt Museum, ISSN 1235-0087Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Senatlantiska faunalämningar från en boplats vid Leksand, Dalarna1994In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 89, p. 251-256Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 19.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Säl och säljakt i Östersjöområdet under stenåldern1989In: Faunahistoriska studier tillägnade Johannes Lepiksaar. Symposium 26 maj 1988 / [ed] Iregren, E. & Liljekvist, R., Lund: Lund University , 1989, p. 57-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Tama och vilda djur på fem skånska boplatser daterade till bronsålder, järnålder och medeltid1996In: Skåne på längden: Sydgasundersökningarna 1983-1985 / [ed] Räf, E., Lund: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 1996, p. 357-392Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Iregren, Elisabeth
    Vretemark, Maria
    Animal exploitation in Birka - A preliminary report1988In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 83, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 22.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kjellberg, Anna-Stina
    Åkerlund, Agneta
    Wigh, Bengt
    Osteologisk analys av djurbensmaterialet2003In: Arkeologi på väg: undersökningar för E18. Bronsåldersboplatsen vid Apalle i Uppland : Uppland, Övergrans socken, Apalle, RAÄ 260 / [ed] Ullén, I., Stockholm: Avd. för arkeologiska undersökningar (UV), Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2003, p. 243-317Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Knape, Anita
    Stora Karlsö - en jaktstation under neolitisk tid1991In: Gunneria, ISSN 0332-8554, E-ISSN 1894-7859, Vol. 64, p. 197-205Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 24.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Tyrberg, T.
    Kjellberg, A. S.
    Jonsson, L.
    Ullen, I.
    The earliest record of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in northern Europe1997In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 183-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) recovered from a late Bronze Age (1200-800 sc) settlement in central Sweden are described. The house sparrow is conspicuously rare in prehistoric Europe, and this record constitutes the earliest from the northern part. The find predates the introduction of domestic fowl (Gallus gallus) to Sweden, a species with which the house sparrow has been assumed to be spread simultaneously. Instead, it is here suggested that house sparrows most likely spread over Europe along with the horse Equus caballus. (C) 1997 Academic Press Limited

  • 25.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Wigh, Bengt
    Svensson, Kenneth
    Retrieval of faunal remains at the excavations at Birka: principles, preliminary results and an outline of future osteological analysis1995In: Excavations in the Black Earth 1990, Riksantikvarieämbetet, 1995, p. 82-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analyses of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, Sweden2015In: Forging Identities. The Mobility of Culture in Bronze Age Europe: Report from a Marie Curie Project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard, 2012, Volume 1 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archeological Reports , 2015, p. 183-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material as a means to reconstruct prehistoric residential patterns has previously mainly been applied to populations with terrestrial diets. Here we present a model for populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets, which is based on two-component mixing of strontium isotopes. Applying this model, we can estimate the original strontium isotope value of the terrestrial component of the diet. Accordingly it is possible to identify non-local individuals even if they had a mixed marine/terrestrial diet. The model is applied to tooth enamel samples representing nine individuals recovered from a passage grave in Resmo, on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, where at least five non-local individuals, representing at least two different geographical regions of origin, were identified. Non-local individuals were more frequent during the Bronze Age than during previous phases.

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  • 27.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gabriel Marklin och entomologien: Med anledning av en biografi2017In: Skörvnöpparn, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 28.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Varför var de gamla entomologerna swedenborgare?2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 109-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the decades surrounding the turn of the century 1800, several of the leading entomolo- gists in Sweden were also involved in Christian sects following the doctrines of Emanuel Swedenborg. This has often been noted by historians, but only occasionally by entomolo- gists, and has never been subjected to closer study.

    This paper sketches the history of Swedenborgian entomology in Sweden, from natural history students in Skara in the 1780s, over the utopian plans connected with the Swedish involvement in the colonial adventure in West Africa, to the Linnaean and Swedenborgian societies in Gotland and Stockholm, the coleopterist stronghold on the plain of Västergöt- land, and eventually to a last survivor in Fåhraeus’s old days.

    The two early key figures both came from Västergötland, Adam Afzelius and Leonard Gyllenhal. In the African adventure, the naturalists inspired by Swedenborg were Afzelius and Anders Sparrman. Gotland became a stronghold where Pehr Hemming Odhner and Gustaf J Billberg tutored Olof I Fåhraeus. In the Swedenborgian circles in Stockholm, Billberg, Carl Johan Schönherr and Carl E Deléen were prominent. Then Gyllenhal and Schönherr were both in Västergötland and Fåhraeus in Göteborg. Short biographies of these persons are given and their interconnections laid out.

    The Linnaean perspective on nature had one of its cornerstone in a religious sense of wonder when facing nature, which is known as physico-theology. In the generation after Linnaeus, some prominent naturalists turned away from wonder and speculation, in paral- lel with ongoing enlightenment campaigns against superstition. Especially in the tradi- tional academic natural history environments in Uppsala and Lund there was a reaction with many people turning to the new ideas of ”romantic biology” or ”Naturphilosophie” in Oken’s sense. Whereas in the non-academy-based, more bourgeois and amateur, natural history circles in Stockholm, in Västergötland and eventually in Göteborg, the maintaining of the sense of wonder in Linnaeanism seems to have fit better with the Swedenborgian movement and Swedenborg’s ideas

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  • 29.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vem samlade var under 1700- och 1800-talen?: Entomofaunistikens grundläggande och förutsättningar i Sverige, landskap för landskap.2020In: Skörvnöpparn Supplement, ISSN 2000-4397, no 5, p. 1-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Den entomologiska verksamheten på RIksmuseet 1915-20132019In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief history of entomology at the Swedish Museum of Natural History for the period 1915-1923 is presented in chronicle form. The time circumscription has its background in a recent 100th anniversary of the current museum building, for which there was work on an anniversary book, which has not appeared, and this is based on a contribution originally intended for that book. It concerns primarily the Entomology department (which ended as a unit in 2013 when it was part of a fusion into a Zoology department) but also includes the Entomological Society of Stockholm to the extent it has been based at the museum, as well as insect-related work in other museum departments. The chronicle gives plenty of examples of research and researchers, other staff and routines, collection growth and management, collecting expeditions and publications, work environment issues and everyday life at the department.

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  • 31. Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Storå, J.
    Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, p. 1215-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in modern‐day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (~0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea.               

    Methods

    87Sr/86Sr ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi‐collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA‐MC‐ICP‐MS). The method enables micro‐sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections.               

    Results

    The analyses showed inter‐tooth 87Sr/86Sr variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra‐tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime.               

    Conclusions

    The method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) 87Sr/86Sr differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on 87Sr/86Sr ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

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  • 32.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Where Swedish polar research began: the Linnaean apostle Anton Rolandson Martin’s voyage to Spitsbergen in 17582018In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 54, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1758 the renowned Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus sent his student Anton Rolandson Martin to the Arctic on-board a whaler to collect scientific specimens. He became the first Swedish scientist to sail these northern waters and to set foot on Spitsbergen. But what route did the ship take and where exactly did he land? By using a combination of geographical information in Martin’s diary together with latitude and wind directions from his meteorological records the ship’s voyage has been reconstructed. The whaler set course directly to the west coast of Spitsbergen and then patrolled waters from there to the eastern flank of the ice fields off Greenland. The ship then returned to Spitsbergen as the whaling season drew to an end. Martin got the chance to set foot on land only once and for just two hours. After recent field work at the presumed locality 258 years after Martin’s visit, his descriptions of the islets were checked and a first-hand comparison was made between the rock sample Martin brought home and the local bedrock. The author is now confident that the landing took place on Forlandsøyane islands, situated off the southwestern coast of Prins Karls Forland.

  • 33. Heino, M T
    et al.
    Salmi, A K
    Aikas, T
    Mannermaa, K
    Kirkinen, T
    Sablin, M
    Ruokonen, M
    Nunez, M
    Okkonen, J
    Dalen, L
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Aspi, J
    Reindeer from Sami offering sites document the replacement of wild reindeer genetic lineages by domestic ones in Northern Finland starting from 1400 to 1600 AD2021In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Kershaw, Jane
    et al.
    Merkel, Stephen W.
    Oravisjärvi, Jani
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Kielman-Schmitt, Melanie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    The scale of dirham imports to the Baltic in the ninth century: new evidence from archaeometric analyses of early Viking-Age silver2021In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 185-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Knape, Anita
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Stora Förvar - kontinuitet och förändring i ett resurs­utnyttjande1988In: Gotländskt arkiv, ISSN 0434-2429, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 36. Knape, Anita
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Återupptäckta fynd från grottan Stora Förvar1983In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 78, p. 169-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Anton Sögren och Hugo V. Tiberg - två smålänningar i den värmländska förskingringen2015In: Värmland förr och nu/ 2015: Värmlands Museum - Långban gruv- och kulturby / [ed] Andreas Hansen, Karlstad: Värmlands Museum , 2015, p. 104-117Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Eric Thomas Svedenstierna2017In: Svenskt biografiskt lexikon, Vol. 169, p. 512-517Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Herman Sundholm2014In: Svenskt Biografiskt Lexikon, Vol. 34, no 167, p. 268-271Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Karl Sundberg2014In: Svenskt Biografiskt Lexikon, Vol. 34, no 167, p. 213-215Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Knut Styffe2013In: Svenskt biografiskt lexikon SBL, Vol. 34, no 166, p. 127-130Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Mineralfynd vid Nordmarksberg - en historisk överblick2015In: Historien om Nordmarksbergs gruvor / [ed] Jan Kruse, Mjölby: Atremi AB , 2015, 750, p. 174-176Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Langhof, Jörgen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Nils Sundius2014In: Svenskt Biografiskt Lexikon, Vol. 34, no 167, p. 274-279Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44. Möllerstrom, A. E.
    et al.
    Soder, P. O.
    Frithiof, L.
    Wouters, F.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Marginal Bone Loss in a Medieval Population in Stockholm1987In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 287-287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Möllerstrom, A. E.
    et al.
    Soder, P. O.
    Frithiof, L.
    Wouters, F. R.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Marginal Bone Loss in a Medieval Population in Stockholm1989In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 703-703Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46. Nord, Anders
    et al.
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Tronner, Kate
    Björling Olausson, Karin
    Lead isotope data for provenancing mediaeval pigments in Swedish mural paintings2015In: Journal of Cultural Heritage, ISSN 1296-2074, E-ISSN 1778-3674, Vol. 16, p. 856-861Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Nord, Anders
    et al.
    Lundmark, Elin
    Asp, Mia
    Tronner, Kate
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pigmentanalys av 1100-talsmålningarna i Torpa kyrka, Kungsör2017In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 2017, no 2, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Nord, Anders
    et al.
    Tronner, Kate
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Asp, Misa
    Lundmark, Elin
    Björling Olausson, Karin
    Pigmentanalys av medeltida muralmålningar i sju norrlandskyrkor2017In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 112, p. 216-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have sampled and analysed pigments from murals in seven Medieval churches in the northern 2/3 of Sweden. These churches are, listed from south to north: Trönö, Enånger, Hälsingtuna, Alnö, Liden, Grundsunda and Nederluleå.The murals date from c. 1300–1550.The analyses were performed with a Hitachi S-4300 scanning electron microscope. The churches of Enånger and Alnö are richly decorated, and they also yielded the most interesting results. In Enånger we identified ultramarine and yellow volborthite, a rare copper vanadate mineral. In Hälsingtuna the infrequently used mineral vivianite was found. Some of these churches were presumably important sojourns for pilgrims en route along the coast of the Baltic Sea to Nidaros-Trondheim. The murals in the Old church of Nederluleå, 800 km north of Stockholm, are generally attributed to the workshop of the renowned master Albertus Pictor, and our pigment analyses support this. In Trönö, Liden and Grundsunda only fragmentary murals survive. Seven lead pigments were selected from four churches and analyzed with a mass spectrometer to determine their lead isotope ratios. The lead pigments in Hälsingtuna, Grundsunda and Nederluleå originate in Germany, presumably the Harz or Erzgebirge regions. Three lead pigments used at Enånger were found to be a mixture of pigments from Germany and Sweden, in the latter case from the Bergslagen region, where mines were worked quite early. This is the first time that we have identified a Medieval lead pigment with a Swedish origin.

  • 49. Nord, Anders
    et al.
    Tronner, Kate
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Gustafsson Belzacq, Marianne
    Pigment traces on medieval stonework in Goland´s churches - examination of seven 12th century baptismal fonts and a limestone pew2016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, no 1, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Nord, Anders
    et al.
    Tronner, Kate
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Strandberg Zerpe, Birgitta
    Analysis of mediaeval Swedish paintings influenced by Russian-Byzanthine art2016In: Journal of Cultural Heritage, ISSN 1296-2074, E-ISSN 1778-3674Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 60
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