Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bengtson, Annika
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Species diversification in the Mediterranean genus Chiliadenus (Inuleae-Asteraceae)2018In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 304, no 7, p. 853-860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chiliadenus is a small genus in the Inuleae (Asteraceae), consisting of ten species with allopatric distributions along the southern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. The different species have restricted areas of distribution, with only one being more widely distributed. The first molecular phylogenetic study of the genus with complete sampling, as well as a biogeographic analysis of the origin and biogeographic patterns leading to the current diversity of Chiliadenus is presented. Results confirm Chiliadenus as monophyletic and placed as sister to Dittrichia. The ancestor of Chiliadenus is dated to have diverged from that of Dittrichia around 5.45 Ma ago, coinciding with the Messinian salinity crisis, whereas the Chiliadenus crown group is dated to 2.29 Ma, around 3 million years later. Ancestral area reconstructions show the crown group to likely have originated in the area around Morocco and northwestern Algeria, which is also the area where the early divergences have occurred. Chiliadenus has then later diverged and dispersed over the Mediterranean to its current distribution. The evolution of the Chiliadenus crown group coincides with the onset of the Mediterranean climate, and its evolution may be connected to the subsequent climatic changes.

  • 2. Dawes, T.
    et al.
    Villareal, Juan Carlos
    Szövényi, Péter
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Li, F. W.
    Hauser, Duncan A.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Cargill, D. C.
    Forrest, Laura L.
    Extremely low genetic diversity in the European clade of the modelbryophyte Anthoceros agrestis2020In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 306, no 2, article id 49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hornwort Anthoceros agrestis is emerging as a model system for the study of symbiotic interactions and carbon fixation processes. It is an annual species with a remarkably small and compact genome. Single accessions of the plant have been shown to be related to the cosmopolitan perennial hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. We provide the first detailed insight into the evolutionary history of the two species. Due to the rather conserved nature of organellar loci, we sequenced multiple accessions in the Anthoceros agrestisA. punctatus complex using three nuclear regions: the ribosomal spacer ITS2, and exon and intron regions from the single-copy coding genes rbcS and phytochrome. We used phylogenetic and dating analyses to uncover the relationships between these two taxa. Our analyses resolve a lineage of genetically near-uniform European A. agrestis accessions and two non-European A. agrestis lineages. In addition, the cosmopolitan species Anthoceros punctatus forms two lineages, one of mostly European accessions, and another from India. All studied European A. agrestis accessions have a single origin, radiated relatively recently (less than 1 million years ago), and are currently strictly associated with agroecosystem habitats.

  • 3. Eriksson, Torsten
    et al.
    Lundberg, Magnus
    Töpel, Mats
    Östensson, Pia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Smedmark, Jenny E. E.
    Sibbaldia: a molecular phylogenetic study of a remarkably polyphyletic genus in Rosaceae2014In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 301, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Freire, Susana E.
    et al.
    Chemisquy, M. A.
    Anderberg, Arne A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Beck, S. G.
    Meneses, R. I.
    Loeuille, B.
    Urtubey, E.
    The Lucilia group (Asteraceae, Gnaphalieae): phylogenetic and taxonomic considerations based on molecular and morphological evidence.2015In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 301, p. 1227-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lucilia group sensu Anderberg and Freire comprises nine South American genera: Belloa, Berroa, Chevreulia, Cuatrecasasiella, Facelis, Gamochaetopsis, Jalcophila, Lucilia and Luciliocline. The aims of this contribution were, using DNA sequences from plastid (rpl32-trnL, trnL-F) and nuclear (ITS and ETS) markers, together with morphological characters, to test the monophyly of the Lucilia group and provide new insight into generic circumscriptions. Our studies, including a broad taxon sampling of Gnaphalieae species, suggest that the Lucilia group is paraphyletic, since Antennaria, Chionolaena, Gamochaeta, Loricaria, Micropsis, Mniodes and Stuckertiella are all nested within the Lucilia group. Morphology and molecular analyses combined showed that the traditional generic circumscription of most of the genera (e.g., Berroa, Chevreulia, Chionolaena, Cuatrecasasiella, Facelis, Jalcophila and Micropsis) correlates with the inferred phylogenetic relationships. Conversely, Lucilia and Luciliocline are non-monophyletic. Lucilia is nested in a clade with Berroa, Facelis and Micropsis. Luciliocline is strongly embedded within the clade Belloa pp + Mniodes. Our results are consistent with Dillon’s study that considered Belloa as a montotypic genus (B. chilensis). Luciliocline and the remaining species of Belloa are accommodated in the genus Mniodes, and the necessary combinations are proposed for the expanded Mniodes. All the analyses showed that the monotypic genera Stuckertiella and Gamochaetopsis are in a well-supported clade nested within Gamochaeta, which implies that taxonomic changes are required also for these genera. Internal relationships in the group and the key morphological characters used in the taxonomy of the group, as well as incongruences found between morphological and molecular analyses, are discussed.

     

  • 5.
    FRIIS, Else Marie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    IGLESIAS, Ari
    Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Ambiente INIBIOMA (CONICET-UNCO), San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    División Paleontología de Vertebrados, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata – CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Notonuphar antarctica, an extinct water lily (Nymphaeales) from the Eocene of Antarctica2017In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 303, no 7, p. 969-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new genus and species, Notonuphar antarctica, is described from the Eocene of Seymour (Marambio) Island, the Antarctic Peninsula and assigned to the Nymphaeales based on well-preserved seeds. This is the first record of a water lily from Antarctica and the first record of a Gondwanan plant with close link to the genus Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae), which is restricted today to the Northern Hemisphere. Critical features for systematic placement of Notonuphar are the presence of a germination cap with closely spaced hilar scar and micropyle, anatropous, bitegmic and exotestal seed organization, exotesta composed of one cell layer of high sclerenchymatic palisade-shape cells, mesotesta of smaller, low parenchymatic cells, a few cell layers deep, and a thin tegmen. The seeds of Notonuphar are particularly similar to seeds of extant and fossil Nuphar in the straight, unfolded anticlinal wall of the exotestal cells and the presence of a narrow zone of exotestal tissue between hilum and micropyle. Other seed features including the very tall exotestal cells and strongly thickened cell walls of exotesta also link Notonuphar to Brasenia and related fossil taxa (Cabombaceae). This character mosaic observed in Notonuphar corroborates the transitional position of Nuphar between Cabombaceae and Nymphaeaceae. Notonuphar is the only member of Nymphaeales recorded from Antarctica and so far the only fossil seeds of Nymphaeales known from the Southern Hemisphere. The discovery of this extinct Gondwanan taxon with features suggesting close relationship with extant Northern Hemisphere genus Nuphar is a further evidence for the relictual nature of the extant group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6. Grímsson, F
    et al.
    Zetter, R.
    Grimm, G. W.
    Pedersen, G. K.
    Pedersen, A. K.
    Denk, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fagaceae pollen from the early Cenozoic of West Greenland: revisiting Engler’s and Chaney’s Arcto-Tertiary hypotheses2014In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 301, p. 809-832Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Three molecular markers suggest different relationships among three Drepanocladus species (Bryophyta: Amblystegiaceae)2017In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 303, p. 521-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Tortella rigens (Bryophyta, Pottiaceae): relationships, regional variation, and conservation aspects2015In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Heinrichs, Jochen
    Gallego, María Teresa
    The Scandinavian Syntrichia ruralis complex (Musci, Pottiaceae): a chaos of diversification2019In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 305, p. 639-661Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Ordas, Jorge Anton D.
    et al.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Moran, Cecilia
    Alejandro, Grecebio Jonathan
    Phylogeny and the evolutionary origins of myrmecophytism in the Neonauclea clade (Rubiaceae) revisited, with particular emphasis on the Philippine lineages2021In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 307, no 3, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australasian Neonauclea is the largest genus of the tribe Naucleeae (subfamily Cinchonoideae, Rubiaceae) and is well known for its extensive radiation of myrmecophytic species. The genus is paraphyletic with respect to the genera Ludekia and Myrmeconauclea, and these three genera constitute the Neonauclea clade sensu Löfstrand et al. The Philippines is a center of species diversity of Neonauclea; however, its members have yet to be included in any molecular studies. We produced a phylogeny of the Neonauclea clade based on sequence data from nuclear (ETS and ITS) and plastid (rbcL and trnT-F) markers and including a large sampling of Neonauclea species from the Philippines. The resulting phylogeny was used to assess the phylogenetic positions and relationships of the Philippine Neonauclea species within the Neonauclea clade. We also reassessed the origins of myrmecophytism in the Neonauclea clade using ancestral state reconstructions. The sampled Philippine Neonauclea were resolved in five morphologically and geographically distinct clades. Our ancestral state reconstructions inferred a non-myrmecophytic ancestor for the Neonauclea clade, as shown by Razafimandimbison et al., and suggested at least two independent origins of myrmecophytism, one in myrmecophytic Myrmeconauclea and another in the myrmecophytic Neonauclea species from core Neonauclea. Losses of myrmedomes through multiple evolutionary reversals back to the non-myrmedome condition were inferred within core Neonauclea. Unlike the Bornean myrmecophytic lineages, our results favored a single origin of the Philippine endemic myrmecophytic Neonauclea.

  • 11. Ronse De Craene, Louis
    et al.
    Quandt, Dietmar
    Wanntorp, Livia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Flower morphology and anatomy of Sabia (Sabiaceae): structural basis of an advanced pollination system among basal eudicots2015In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 301, no 6, p. 1543-1553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flowers of four species of Sabia are investigated using scanning electron and light microscopy to understand the complex floral system of Sabiaceae and to contribute to the understanding of the systematic position of the family among early diverging eudicots. The structure of the mature flower and the floral anatomy are here described and compared with that of the sister genus Meliosma. The floral structure is relatively uniform with the greatest variability in the shape of the nectary and the differentiation of the style. Flowers share a similar pollen release mechanism, as pollen is extruded from the monosporangiate thecae through an inward-out dehiscence process leading to seemingly extrorse anthers occasionally accompanied by the curving of the upper part of the filaments. The bicarpellate ovary is divided in a synascidiate zone and a symplicate zone of similar size with two superposed unitegmic ovules per carpel. The floral Bauplan of Sabia can be interpreted as precursory to a further evolution of the monosymmetric flower of Meliosma, as both genera share numerous characters. The isolated position of Sabiaceae in the early diverging eudicots is highlighted by their unique floral morphology, although several features point to a link with Ranunculales, such as Menispermaceae. These probably reflect the existence of apomorphic tendencies shared by members of the early diverging eudicots.

  • 12. Urtubey, Estrella
    et al.
    Lopez, Alicia
    Chemisquy, Maria A.
    Anderberg, Arne Alfred
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Baeza, Carlos M.
    Bayon, Nestor D.
    Deble, Leonardo P.
    Moreira-Muñoz, Andres
    Nesom, Guy L.
    Alford, Mac H.
    Salomon, Luciana
    Freire, Susana E.
    New circumscription of the genus Gamochaeta (Asteraceae, Gnaphalieae) inferred from nuclear and plastid DNA sequences2016In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 302, p. 1047-1066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamochaeta (tribe Gnaphalieae, Asteraceae) is composed of ca. 60 species primarily distributed in tropical and subtropical America. Within the tribe Gnaphalieae, the genus is characterized by capitula arranged in spikes or head-like clusters, few hermaphroditic central florets, truncate style branches with apical sweeping trichomes, pappus bristles connate at the base into a ring falling as a unit, and achenes with globose twin trichomes. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have suggested the paraphyly of the genus, but have not provided a basis for redefining generic limits due to incomplete taxon sampling. To address this problem, DNA sequences from the plastid (trnL-F) and nuclear (ETS and ITS) genomes were analyzed from a broad taxon sample representing the full range of morphological variation known in the genus. Our results affirm that Gamochaeta is paraphyletic as presently circumscribed. Two clades can be recognized: one clade that includes the majority of the species currently assigned to Gamochaeta and a second clade that includes Gamochaetopsis, Stuckertiella and seven species of Gamochaeta. We present here a new circumscription of Gamochaeta, including two new combinations, Gamochaeta alpina and Gamochaeta peregrina, and the resurrection of Gamochaeta capitata. Our results also show Omalotheca supina, O. norvegica and O. sylvatica, which were placed by some authors in Gamochaeta or in Gnaphalium, form a monophyletic group distantly related to both genera.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf