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  • 1. Ameen, Carly
    et al.
    Feuerborn, Tatiana R.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Brown, Sarah K.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Hulme-Beaman, Ardern
    Lebrasseur, Ophelie
    Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.
    Lounsberry, Zachary T.
    Lin, Audrey T.
    Appelt, Martin
    Bachmann, Lutz
    Betts, Matthew
    Britton, Kate
    Darwent, John
    Dietz, Rune
    Fredholm, Merete
    Gopalakrishnan, Shyam
    Goriunova, Olga I.
    Gronnow, Bjarne
    Haile, James
    Hallsson, Jon Hallsteinn
    Harrison, Ramona
    Heide-Jorgensen, Mads Peter
    Knecht, Rick
    Losey, Robert J.
    Masson-MacLean, Edouard
    McGovern, Thomas H.
    McManus-Fry, Ellen
    Meldgaard, Morten
    Midtdal, Aslaug
    Moss, Madonna L.
    Nikitin, Iurii G.
    Nomokonova, Tatiana
    Palsdottir, Albina Hulda
    Perri, Angela
    Popov, Aleksandr N.
    Rankin, Lisa
    Reuther, Joshua D.
    Sablin, Mikhail
    Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth
    Shirar, Scott
    Smiarowski, Konrad
    Sonne, Christian
    Stiner, Mary C.
    Vasyukov, Mitya
    West, Catherine F.
    Ween, Gro Birgit
    Wennerberg, Sanne Eline
    Wiig, Oystein
    Woollett, James
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Hansen, Anders J.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Sacks, Benjamin N.
    Frantz, Laurent
    Larson, Greger
    Dobney, Keith
    Darwent, Christyann M.
    Evin, Allowen
    Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic2019In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1916, article id 20191929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestic dogs have been central to life in the North American Arctic for millennia. The ancestors of the Inuit were the first to introduce the widespread usage of dog sledge transportation technology to the Americas, but whether the Inuit adopted local Palaeo-Inuit dogs or introduced a new dog population to the region remains unknown. To test these hypotheses, we generated mitochondrial DNA and geometric morphometric data of skull and dental elements from a total of 922 North American Arctic dogs and wolves spanning over 4500 years. Our analyses revealed that dogs from Inuit sites dating from 2000 BP possess morphological and genetic signatures that distinguish them from earlier Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and identified a novel mitochondrial clade in eastern Siberia and Alaska. The genetic legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in modern Arctic sledge dogs despite phenotypic differences between archaeological and modern Arctic dogs. Together, our data reveal that Inuit dogs derive from a secondary pre-contact migration of dogs distinct from Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and probably aided the Inuit expansion across the North American Arctic beginning around 1000 BP.

  • 2. Butler, Aodhán
    et al.
    Cunningham, John
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Budd, Graham
    Donoghue, Philip
    Experimental taphonomy of Artemia reveals the role of endogenous microbes in mediating decay and fossilization2015In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, p. 20150476-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exceptionally preserved fossils provide major insights into the evolutionary

    history of life. Microbial activity is thought to play a pivotal role in both the

    decay of organisms and the preservation of soft tissue in the fossil record,

    though this has been the subject of very little experimental investigation.

    To remedy this, we undertook an experimental study of the decay of the

    brine shrimp Artemia, examining the roles of autolysis, microbial activity,

    oxygen diffusion and reducing conditions. Our findings indicate that

    endogenous gut bacteria are the main factor controlling decay. Following

    gut wall rupture, but prior to cuticle failure, gut-derived microbes spread

    into the body cavity, consuming tissues and forming biofilms capable of

    mediating authigenic mineralization, that pseudomorph tissues and structures

    such as limbs and the haemocoel. These observations explain patterns

    observed in exceptionally preserved fossil arthropods. For example, guts

    are preserved relatively frequently, while preservation of other internal anatomy

    is rare. They also suggest that gut-derived microbes play a key role in the

    preservation of internal anatomy and that differential preservation between

    exceptional deposits might be because of factors that control autolysis and

    microbial activity. The findings also suggest that the evolution of a through

    gut and its bacterial microflora increased the potential for exceptional fossil

    preservation in bilaterians, providing one explanation for the extreme rarity

    of internal preservation in those animals that lack a through gut.

  • 3.
    Cunningham, John
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vargas, Kelly
    Liu, Pengju
    Belivanova, Veneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Marone, Federica
    Martínez-Pérez, Carlos
    Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel
    Holler, Mirko
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Donoghue, Philip C.J.
    Critical appraisal of tubular putative eumetazoans from the Ediacaran Weng’an Doushantuo biota2015In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, p. 1-9, article id 2151169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular clock analyses estimate that crown-group animals began diversifying hundreds of millions of years before the start of the Cambrian period. However, the fossil record has not yielded unequivocal evidence for animals during this interval. Some of the most promising candidates for Precambrian animals occur in theWeng’an biota of South China, including a suite of tubular fossils assigned to Sinocyclocyclicus, Ramitubus, Crassitubus and Quadratitubus, that have been interpreted as soft-bodied eumetazoans comparable to tabulate corals. Here, we present new insights into the anatomy, original composition and phylogenetic affinities of these taxa based on data from synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy, ptychographic nanotomography, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The patterns of deformation observed suggest that the cross walls of Sinocyclocyclicus and Quadratitubus were more rigid than those of Ramitubus and Crassitubus. Ramitubus and Crassitubus specimens preserve enigmatic cellular clusters at terminal positions in the tubes. Specimens of Sinocyclocyclicus and Ramitubus have biological features that might be cellular tissue or subcellular structures filling the spaces between the crosswalls. These observations are incompatible with a cnidarian interpretation, in which the spaces between cross walls are abandoned parts of the former living positions of the polyp. The affinity of the Weng’an tubular fossils may lie within the algae.

  • 4. Davies, Thomas G.
    et al.
    Rahman, Imran A.
    Lautenschlager, Stephan
    Cunningham, John A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. University of Bristol.
    Asher, Robert J.
    Barrett, Paul M.
    Bates, Karl T.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Benson, Roger B. J.
    Boyer, Doug M.
    Braga, José
    Bright, Jen A.
    Claessens, Leon P. A. M.
    Cox, Philip G.
    Dong, Xi-Ping
    Evans, Alistair R.
    Falkingham, Peter L.
    Friedman, Matt
    Garwood, Russell J.
    Goswami, Anjali
    Hutchinson, John R.
    Jeffery, Nathan S.
    Johanson, Zerina
    Lebrun, Renaud
    Martínez-Pérez, Carlos
    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús
    O’Higgins, Paul M.
    Metscher, Brian
    Orliac, Maeva
    Rowe, Timothy B.
    Rücklin, Martin
    Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.
    Shubin, Neil H.
    Smith, Selena Y.
    Starck, J. Matthias
    Stringer, Chris
    Summers, Adam P.
    Sutton, Mark D.
    Walsh, Stig A.
    Weisbecker, Vera
    Witmer, Lawrence M.
    Wroe, Stephen
    Yin, Zongjun
    Rayfield, Emily J.
    Donoghue, Philip C.J.
    University of Bristol.
    Open data and digital morphology.2017In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1852, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past two decades, the development of methods for visualizing and analysing specimens digitally, in three and even four dimensions, has transformed the study of living and fossil organisms. However, the initial promise that the widespread application of such methods would facilitate access to the underlying digital data has not been fully achieved. The underlying datasets for many published studies are not readily or freely available, introducing a barrier to verification and reproducibility, and the reuse of data. There is no current agreement or policy on the amount and type of data that should be made available alongside studies that use, and in some cases are wholly reliant on, digital morphology. Here, we propose a set of recommendations for minimum standards and additional best practice for three-dimensional digital data publication, and review the issues around data storage, management and accessibility.

  • 5. Dyer, Adrian G
    et al.
    Boyd-Gerny, Skye
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Rosa, Marcello G P
    Simonov, Vera
    Wong, Bob B M
    Parallel evolution of angiosperm colour signals: common evolutionary pressures linked to hymenopteran vision.2012In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 279, no 1742, p. 3606-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flowering plants in Australia have been geographically isolated for more than 34 million years. In the Northern Hemisphere, previous work has revealed a close fit between the optimal discrimination capabilities of hymenopteran pollinators and the flower colours that have most frequently evolved. We collected spectral data from 111 Australian native flowers and tested signal appearance considering the colour discrimination capabilities of potentially important pollinators. The highest frequency of flower reflectance curves is consistent with data reported for the Northern Hemisphere. The subsequent mapping of Australian flower reflectances into a bee colour space reveals a very similar distribution of flower colour evolution to the Northern Hemisphere. Thus, flowering plants in Australia are likely to have independently evolved spectral signals that maximize colour discrimination by hymenoptera. Moreover, we found that the degree of variability in flower coloration for particular angiosperm species matched the range of reflectance colours that can only be discriminated by bees that have experienced differential conditioning. This observation suggests a requirement for plasticity in the nervous systems of pollinators to allow generalization of flowers of the same species while overcoming the possible presence of non-rewarding flower mimics.

  • 6. Ekman, Jan
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Out of Gondwanaland; the evolutionary history of cooperative breeding and social behaviour among crows, magpies, jays and allies.2006In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 273, no 1590, p. 1117-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperative breeding is comparatively rare among birds in the mainly temperate and boreal Northern Hemisphere. Here we test if the distribution of breeding systems reflects a response to latitude by means of a phylogenetic analysis using correlates with geographical range among the corvids (crows, jays, magpies and allied groups). The corvids trace their ancestry to the predominantly cooperative 'Corvida' branch of oscine passerines from the Australo-Papuan region on the ancient Gondwanaland supercontinent, but we could not confirm the ancestral state of the breeding system within the family, while family cohesion may be ancestral. Initial diversification among pair-breeding taxa that are basal in the corvid phylogeny, represented by genera such as Pyrrhocorax and Dendrocitta, indicates that the corvid family in its current form could have evolved from pair-breeding ancestors only after they had escaped the Australo-Papuan shield. Within the family, cooperative breeding (alloparental care/family cohesion) is strongly correlated to latitude and its predominance in species maintaining a southerly distribution indicates a secondary evolution of cooperative breeding in the lineage leading away from the basal corvids. Multiple transitions show plasticity in the breeding system, indicating a response to latitude rather than evolutionary inertia. The evolutionary background to the loss of cooperative breeding among species with a northerly distribution is complex and differs between species, indicating a response to a variety of selection forces. Family cohesion where the offspring provide alloparental care is a main route to cooperatively breeding groups among corvids. Some corvid species lost only alloparental care, while maintaining coherent family groups. Other species lost family cohesion and, as a corollary, they also lost the behaviour where retained offspring provide alloparental care.

  • 7.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Christidis, Les
    Cooper, Alan
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jackson, Jennifer
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norman, Janette A
    A Gondwanan origin of passerine birds supported by DNA sequences of the endemic New Zealand wrens.2002In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 269, no 1488, p. 235-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zoogeographic, palaeontological and biochemical data support a Southern Hemisphere origin for passerine birds, while accumulating molecular data suggest that most extant avian orders originated in the mid-Late Cretaceous. We obtained DNA sequence data from the nuclear c-myc and RAG-1 genes of the major passerine groups and here we demonstrate that the endemic New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) are the sister taxon to all other extant passerines, supporting a Gondwanan origin and early radiation of passerines. We propose that (i) the acanthisittids were isolated when New Zealand separated from Gondwana (ca. 82-85 Myr ago), (ii) suboscines, in turn, were derived from an ancestral lineage that inhabited western Gondwana, and (iii) the ancestors of the oscines (songbirds) were subsequently isolated by the separation of Australia from Antarctica. The later spread of passerines into the Northern Hemisphere reflects the northward migration of these former Gondwanan elements.

  • 8. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sapayoa aenigma: a New World representative of 'Old World suboscines'.2003In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 270 Suppl 2, p. S238-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passerine birds are very plastic in their adaptations, which has made it difficult to define phylogenetic lineages and correctly allocate all species to these. Sapayoa aenigma, a member of the large group of New World flycatchers, has been difficult to place, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments have indicated that it may have been misplaced. This is confirmed here, as base sequencing of two nuclear genes places it as a deep branch in the group of broadbills and pittas of the Old World tropics. The peculiar distribution of this lineage may be best explained in terms of a Gondwanic and Late Cretaceous origin of the passerine birds, as this particular lineage dispersed from the Antarctic landmass, reaching the Old World tropics via the drifting Indian plate, and South America via the West Antarctic Peninsula.

  • 9.
    Friis, Else Marie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard
    Department of Geoscience, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Crane, Peter R
    Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, CT, USA & Oak Spring Garden Foundation, Upperville, VA, USA.
    The emergence of core eudicots: new floral evidence from the earliest Late Cretaceous2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, p. 1-9, article id 20161325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eudicots, the most diverse of the three major clades of living angiosperms, are first recognized in the latest Barremian–earliest Aptian. All Early Cretaceous forms appear to be related to species-poor lineages that diverged before the rise of core eudicots, which today comprise more than 70% of angiosperm species. Here, we report the discovery of a well-preserved flower, Caliciflora mauldinensis, from the earliest Late Cretaceous, with unequivocal core eudicot features, including five sepals, five petals and two whorls of stamens borne on the rim of a floral cup containing three free carpels. Pollen is tricolporate. Carpels mature into follicular fruitlets. This character combination suggests a phylogenetic position among rosids, but more specific assignment is precluded by complex patterns of character evolution among the very large number of potentially relevant extant taxa. The whorled floral organization is consistent with ideas that this stable pattern evolved early and was a prerequisite for more integrated patterns of floral architecture that evolved later. However, limited floral synorganization in Caliciflora and all earlier eudicot flowers recognized so far, calls into question hypotheses that substantial diversification of core eudicots had already occurred by the end of the Early Cretaceous.

  • 10.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fabre, Pierre-Henri
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Jønsson, Knud A
    Roselaar, Cees S
    Sangster, George
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The spatio-temporal colonization and diversification across the Indo-Pacific by a 'great speciator' (Aves, Erythropitta erythrogaster).2013In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1759, p. 20130309-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Indo-Pacific region has arguably been the most important area for the formulation of theories about biogeography and speciation, but modern studies of the tempo, mode and magnitude of diversification across this region are scarce. We study the biogeographic history and characterize levels of diversification in the wide-ranging passerine bird Erythropitta erythrogaster using molecular, phylogeographic and population genetics methods, as well as morphometric and plumage analyses. Our results suggest that E. erythrogaster colonized the Indo-Pacific during the Pleistocene in an eastward direction following a stepping stone pathway, and that sea-level fluctuations during the Pleistocene may have promoted gene flow only locally. A molecular species delimitation test suggests that several allopatric island populations of E. erythrogaster may be regarded as species. Most of these putative new species are further characterized by diagnostic differences in plumage. Our study reconfirms the E. erythrogaster complex as a 'great speciator': it represents a complex of up to 17 allopatrically distributed, reciprocally monophyletic and/or morphologically diagnosable species that originated during the Pleistocene. Our results support the view that observed latitudinal gradients of genetic divergence among avian sister species may have been affected by incomplete knowledge of taxonomic limits in tropical bird species.

  • 11. Iversen, Lars Lönnsman
    et al.
    Svensson, Erik I
    Christensen, Sören Thromsholdt
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sand-Jensen, Kaj
    Sexual conflict and intrasexual polymorphism promote assortative mating and halt population differentiation2019In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual conflict is thought to be an important evolutionary force in drivingphenotypic diversification, population divergence, and speciation. However,empirical evidence is inconsistent with the generality that sexual conflictenhances population divergence. Here, we demonstrate an alternativeevolutionary outcome in which sexual conflict plays a conservative role inmaintaining male and female polymorphisms locally, rather than promotingpopulation divergence. In diving beetles, female polymorphisms haveevolved in response to male mating harassment and sexual conflict. We presentthe first empirical evidence that this female polymorphism is associatedwith (i) two distinct and sympatric male morphological mating clusters(morphs) and (ii) assortative mating between male and female morphs.Changes in mating traits in one sex led to a predictable change in the othersex which leads to predictable within-population evolutionary dynamics inmale and female morph frequencies. Our results reveal that sexual conflictcan lead to assortative mating between male offence and female defencetraits, if a stable male and female mating polymorphisms are maintained.Stable male and female mating polymorphisms are an alternative outcometo an accelerating coevolutionary arms race driven by sexual conflict. Suchstable polymorphisms challenge the common view of sexual conflict as anengine of rapid speciation via exaggerated coevolution between sexes.

  • 12. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Correction to 'The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos'.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1837, article id 20161497Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Delhey, Kaspar
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The evolution of mimicry of friarbirds by orioles (Aves: Passeriformes) in Australo-Pacific archipelagos.2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, no 1833, article id 20160409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by Alfred Wallace and Jared Diamond of plumage similarities between co-occurring orioles (Oriolus) and friarbirds (Philemon) in the Malay archipelago led them to conclude that the former represent visual mimics of the latter. Here, we use molecular phylogenies and plumage reflectance measurements to test several key predictions of the mimicry hypothesis. We show that friarbirds originated before brown orioles, that the two groups did not co-speciate, although there is one plausible instance of co-speciation among species on the neighbouring Moluccan islands of Buru and Seram. Furthermore, we show that greater size disparity between model and mimic and a longer history of co-occurrence have resulted in a stronger plumage similarity (mimicry). This suggests that resemblance between orioles and friarbirds represents mimicry and that colonization of islands by brown orioles has been facilitated by their ability to mimic the aggressive friarbirds.

  • 14. Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Christidis, Les
    Clegg, Sonya M
    Holt, Ben G
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Evidence of taxon cycles in an Indo-Pacific passerine bird radiation (Aves: Pachycephala).2014In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 281, no 1777, p. 20131727-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many insular taxa possess extraordinary abilities to disperse but may differ in their abilities to diversify and compete. While some taxa are widespread across archipelagos, others have disjunct (relictual) populations. These types of taxa, exemplified in the literature by selections of unrelated taxa, have been interpreted as representing a continuum of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles). Here, we use molecular data of 35 out of 40 species of the avian genus Pachycephala (including 54 out of 66 taxa in Pachycephala pectoralis (sensu lato), to assess the spatio-temporal evolution of the group. We also include data on species distributions, morphology, habitat and elevational ranges to test a number of predictions associated with the taxon-cycle hypothesis. We demonstrate that relictual species persist on the largest and highest islands across the Indo-Pacific, whereas recent archipelago expansions resulted in colonization of all islands in a region. For co-occurring island taxa, the earliest colonists generally inhabit the interior and highest parts of an island, with little spatial overlap with later colonists. Collectively, our data support the idea that taxa continuously pass through phases of expansions and contractions (i.e. taxon cycles).

  • 15.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A biogeographic network reveals evolutionary links between deep sea hydrothermal vent and methane seep faunas2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, article id 20162337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reply to Smith et al.: Network analysis reveals connectivity patterns in the continuum of reducing ecosystems2017In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, article id 20171644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of whale falls in the connectivity among, and adaptation to, reducing ecosystems in the deep sea has been the matter of a long debate. Hydrothermal vents are the most extreme among the reducing habitats in terms of temperature, metal concentrations and in their geographical isolation, and it is hence thought that stepping stones are needed to reach them. As new types of reducing habitats are being discovered, they are now increasingly seen as a ‘continuum of reducing ecosystems’. Taking this concept seriously implies that any habitat type within this continuum could provide connectivity to any other. Thus rather than focusing just on whales, I will address the issues raised by Smith et al. in the context of the question ‘who provides connectivity with whom, and to which extent?’

  • 17.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reply to Smith et al.: Network analysis reveals connectivity patterns in the continuum of reducing ecosystems2017In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, article id 20171644Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Mellows, Andrew
    et al.
    Barnett, Ross
    Dalen, Love
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Linderholm, Anna
    McGovern, Thomas H.
    Church, Mike J.
    Larson, Greger
    The impact of past climate change on genetic variation and population connectivity in the Icelandic arctic fox2012In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 279, no 1747, p. 4568-4573Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Nystrom, Veronica
    et al.
    Dalen, Love
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Liden, Kerstin
    Ryman, Nils
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Temporal genetic change in the last remaining population of woolly mammoth2010In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 277, no 1692, p. 2331-2337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    et al.
    Dalen, Love
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Sablin, Mikhail
    Sher, Andrei
    Edmark, Veronica Nystrom
    Brandstrom, Mikael D.
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Barnes, Ian
    Thomas, Jessica A.
    Holarctic genetic structure and range dynamics in the woolly mammoth2013In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1770, article id 20131910Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Raia, Pasquale
    et al.
    Carotenuto, F.
    Passaro, F.
    Piras, P.
    Fulgione, D.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Saarinen, J.
    Fortelius, Mikael
    Helsingfors Universitet.
    Rapid action in the Palaeogene. The relationship between phenotypic and taxonomic diversification in Cenozoic mammals2012In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A classic question in evolutionary biology concerns the tempo and mode of lineage evolution. Considered variously in relation to resource utilization, intrinsic constraints or hierarchic level, the question of how evolutionary change occurs in general has continued to draw the attention of the field for over a century and a half. Here we use the largest species-level phylogeny of Coenozoic fossil mammals (1031 species) ever assembled and their body size estimates, to show that body size and taxonomic diversification rates declined from the origin of placentals towards the present, and very probably correlate to each other. These findings suggest that morphological and taxic diversifications of mammals occurred hierarchically, with major shifts in body size coinciding with the birth of large clades, followed by taxonomic diversification within these newly formed clades. As the clades expanded, rates of taxonomic diversification proceeded independently of phenotypic evolution. Such a dynamic is consistent with the idea, central to the Modern Synthesis, that mammals radiated adaptively, with the filling of adaptive zones following the radiation.

  • 22. Stewart, John R.
    et al.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Barnes, Ian
    Dalen, Love
    Refugia revisited: individualistic responses of species in space and time2010In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 277, no 1682, p. 661-671Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Thuy, Ben
    et al.
    Geoscience Centre, University of Göttingen.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Geoscience Center, Göttingen.
    Dulai, Alfred
    Gale, Andy S.
    University of Portsmouth, UK.
    Kroh, Andreas
    Natural History Museum, Vienna.
    Lord, Alan S.
    Numberger-Thuy, Lea
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wisshak, Max
    First glimpse into Lower Jurassic deep-sea biodiversity: in situ diversification and resilience against extinction2014In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 281, article id 20132624Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 23 of 23
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