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  • 1.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wide distributions and cryptic diversity within a Microstomum (Platyhelminthes) species complex2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomum lineare is a common species of fresh and brackish waters found world-wide. Three genes (18S, CO1 and ITS) were sequenced from specimens of M. lineare collected from four countries, and the levels of cryptic diversity and genetic structuring were assessed. Results showed M. lineare has very wide haplotype distributions suggesting higher than expected dispersal capabilities. In addition, three new species were described on the basis of molecular taxonomy: Microstomum artoisi sp. nov., Microstomum tchaikovskyi sp. nov. and Microstomum zicklerorum sp. nov.

  • 2.
    Bachmann, Lutz
    et al.
    Natural History Museum University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Beermann, Jan
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany;Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at Oldenburg University Oldenburg Germany.
    Brey, Thomas
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany;Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at Oldenburg University Oldenburg Germany;University of Bremen Bremen Germany.
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    Natural History Museum University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Dannheim, Jennifer
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany.
    Edvardsen, Bente
    Department of Biosciences, Section for Aquatic Biology and Toxicology University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Holston, Kevin C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics The Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Johansson, Veronika A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics The Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Kloss, Paul
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany;Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at Oldenburg University Oldenburg Germany.
    Konijnenberg, Rebecca
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany.
    Osborn, Karen J.
    Department of Invertebrate Zoology Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Washington DC USA.
    Pappalardo, Paula
    Department of Invertebrate Zoology Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Washington DC USA.
    Pehlke, Hendrik
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany.
    Piepenburg, Dieter
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany;Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at Oldenburg University Oldenburg Germany;Institute for Ecosystem Research, Kiel University Kiel Germany.
    Struck, Torsten H.
    Natural History Museum University of Oslo Oslo Norway.
    Sundberg, Per
    Department of Marine Sciences Gothenburg University Gothenburg Sweden.
    Markussen, Stine Svalheim
    Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre Trondheim Norway.
    Teschke, Katharina
    Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Functional Ecology Bremerhaven Germany;Helmholtz Institute for Functional Marine Biodiversity at Oldenburg University Oldenburg Germany.
    Vanhove, Maarten P. M.
    Centre for Environmental Sciences, Research Group Zoology: Biodiversity & Toxicology Hasselt University Diepenbeek Belgium.
    The role of systematics for understanding ecosystem functions: Proceedings of the Zoologica Scripta Symposium, Oslo, Norway, 25 August 20222023In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 187-214Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Bachmann, Lutz
    et al.
    University of Oslo Natural History Museum P.O. Box 1172 Blindern NO 0318 Oslo Norway.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Sundberg, Per
    University of Gothenburg Department of Marine Sciences P.O. Box 463 SE 40530 Gothenburg Sweden.
    Systematics and biodiversity research in the era of genomics2016In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 45, no S1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Cibois, Alice
    et al.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Alström, Per
    Pasquet, Eric
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Olsson, Urban
    Comprehensive phylogeny of the laughingthrushes and allies (Aves, Leiothrichidae), and a proposal for a revised taxonomy2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 428-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Fjeldsa, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Jonsson, Knud A.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogeny of the ovenbird genus Upucerthia: a case of independent adaptations for terrestrial life2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Fuchs, Jerome
    et al.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Synchronous intercontinental splits between assemblages of woodpeckers suggested by molecular data2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gelang, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Cibois, Alice
    Pasquet, Eric
    Olsson, Urban
    Alstrom, Per
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification2009In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 225-236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Ghorbani, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Irestedt, Martin
    Hao, Yan
    Sundev, Gombobaatar
    Lei, Fumin
    Ma, Ming
    Olsson, Urban
    Alström, Per
    Densely sampled phylogenetic analyses of the Lesser Short‐toed Lark (Alaudala rufescens) — Sand Lark (A. raytal) species complex (Aves, Passeriformes) reveal cryptic diversity2020In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, ISSN - 0300-3256, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 427-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The taxonomy of the Lesser/Asian Short‐toed Lark Alaudala rufescens–cheleensis complex has been debated for decades, mainly because of minor morphological differentiation among the taxa within the complex, and different interpretations of the geographical pattern of morphological characters among different authors. In addition, there have been few studies based on non‐morphological traits. It has recently been suggested based on a molecular study of the lark family Alaudidae that the Sand Lark A. raytal is nested within this complex. We here analysed mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) from 130 individuals across the range of this complex (hereafter called Alaudala rufescens–raytal complex), representing all except two of the 18 currently recognized subspecies. We also analysed 11 nuclear markers from a subsample of these individuals, representing all of the clades found in the cyt b tree. Five primary clades were recovered, which confirmed that A. raytal is nested within this complex. Divergence time estimates among these five clades ranged from 1.76 to 3.16 million years (my; 95% highest posterior density [HPD] 1.0–4.51 my) or 1.99–2.53 my (95% HPD 0.96–4.3 my) in different analyses. Only four of the currently recognized subspecies were recovered as monophyletic in the cyt b tree. Our results call for a taxonomic revision, and we tentatively suggest that at least four species should be recognized, although we stress the need for an approach integrating molecular, morphological and other data that are not yet available.

  • 9.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Batalha-Filho, Henrique
    Roselaar, Cees S.
    Christidis, Les
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Contrasting phylogeographic signatures in two Australo-Papuan bowerbird species complexes (Aves: Ailuroedus): Phylogeography of Ailuroedus2016In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, ISSN - 1463-6409, Vol. - 45, no - 4, p. 365-379Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kallersjo, Mari
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Nuclear DNA from old collections of avian study skins reveals the evolutionary history of the Old World suboscines (Aves, Passeriformes)2006In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 567-580Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri C.K.
    A nuclear DNA phylogeny and a proposed taxonomic revision of African greenbuls (Aves, Passeriformes, Pycnonotidae)2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Jonsson, Knud A.
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    A molecular phylogeny of minivets (Passeriformes: Campephagidae: Pericrocotus): implications for biogeography and convergent plumage evolution2010In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Fejfar, Oldrich
    Geological‐Paleontological Institute Karls University Prague Czech Republic.
    Kimura, Yuri
    Department of Geology and Paleontology National Museum of Nature and Science Tsukuba Japan;Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Barcelona Spain.
    Bailey, Bruce E.
    Division of Vertebrate Paleontology University of Nebraska State Museum Lincoln Nebraska USA.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Paleobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Incisor enamel microstructure places New and Old World Eomyidae outside Geomorpha (Rodentia, Mammalia)2022In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower incisor enamel microstructure of the fossil rodent family Eomyidae was believed to be three-layered and highly derived but rather uniform throughout the clade. Here, we describe a new four-layered schmelzmuster in Eomyidae consisting of a three-fold portio interna with longitudinal oriented, uniserial Hunter-Schreger bands and a one-fold portio externa, accounting for a unique enamel microstructure character combination in Rodentia. This new schmelzmuster type has developed early in eomyid evolution and is detectable already in the late Eocene (Chadronian) of North America. In European eomyids, it first occurs in the early Miocene (MN 3), implying that this four-layered schmelzmuster was not present in all members of the family but restricted to species included in Eomyini and some genera currently considered Eomyidae incertae sedis within Eomyidae. Additionally, our analysis recognizes three taxa with schmelzmuster divergent from all other eomyids. Incisor enamel microstructure does not advocate a close phylogenetic relationship of Eomyidae to either fossil or extant Heteromyidae and Geomyidae, nor to fossil Heliscomyidae and Florentiamyidae. Our results rather support the view that Eomyidae are placed outside Geomorpha.

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  • 14.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Separation of two species standing as Alopecosa aculeata (Clerck) by morphological, behavioural and ecological characters, with remarks on related species in the pulverulenta group (Araneae, Lycosidae)1990In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 203-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Studies on Species of Holarctic Pardosa Groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). I. Redescription of Pardosa albomaculata Emerton and description of two new species from North America, with comments on some taxonomic characters1975In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 217-228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Study of a stridulatory apparatus in Pardosa fulvipes (Collett) (Araneae, Lycosidae) by scanning electron microscopy1973In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 43-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Study on chemosensitive hairs in wolf spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae) by scanning electron microscopy1979In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Bernvi, David C
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Distribution, delimitation and description of species of Archaphanostoma (Acoela)2014In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 44, no 2, article id 218-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogeny of Chaetonotidae and other Paucitubulatina (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotida) and the colonization of aquatic ecosystems2013In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chaetonotidae is the largest family within Gastrotricha with almost 400 nominal species represented in both freshwater and marine habitats. The group is probably non-monophyletic and suffers from a troubled taxonomy. Current classification is to a great extent based on shape and distribution of cuticular structures, characters that are highly variable. We present the most densely sampled molecular study so far where 17 of the 31 genera belonging to Chaetonotida are represented. Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches based on 18S rDNA, 28S rDNA and COI mtDNA are used to reconstruct relationships within Chaetonotidae. The use of cuticular structures for supra-specific classification within the group is evaluated and the question of dispersal between marine and freshwater habitats is addressed. Moreover, the subgeneric classification of Chaetonotus is tested in a phylogenetic context. Our results show high support for a clade containing Dasydytidae nested within Chaetonotidae. Within this clade, only three genera are monophyletic following current classification. Genera containing both marine and freshwater species never form monophyletic clades and group with other species according to habitat. Marine members of Aspidiophorus appear to be the sister group of all other Chaetonotidae and Dasydytidae, indicating a marine origin of the clade. Halichaetonotus and marine Heterolepidoderma form a monophyletic group in a sister group relationship to freshwater species, pointing towards a secondary invasion of marine environments of these taxa. Our study highlights the problems of current classification based on cuticular structures, characters that show homoplasy for deeper relationships.

  • 20.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Tyrant flycatchers coming out in the open: phylogeny and ecological radiation of Tyrannidae (Aves, Passeriformes)2008In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 315-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tyrant flycatchers constitute a substantial component of the land bird fauna in all South American habitats. Past interpretations of the morphological and ecological evolution in the group have been hampered by the lack of a well-resolved hypothesis of their phylogenetic interrelationships. Here, we present a well-resolved phylogeny based on DNA sequences from three nuclear introns for 128 taxa. Our results confirm much of the overall picture of Tyrannidae relationships, and also identify several novel relationships. The genera Onychorhynchus, Myiobius and Terenotriccus are placed outside Tyrannidae and may be more closely related to Tityridae. Tyrannidae consists of two main lineages. An expanded pipromorphine clade includes flatbills, tody-tyrants and antpipits, and also Phylloscartes and Pogonotriccus. The spadebills, Neopipo and Tachuris are their closest relatives. The remainder of the tyrant flycatchers forms a well-supported clade, subdivided in two large subclades, which differ consistently in foraging behaviour, the perch-gleaning elaeniines and the sallying myiarchines, tyrannines and fluvicolines. A third clade is formed by the genera Myiotriccus, Pyrrhomyias, Hirundinea and three species currently placed in Myiophobus. Ancestral habitat reconstruction and divergence date estimation suggest that early divergence events in Tyrannida took place in a humid forest environment during the Oligocene. Large-scale diversification in open habitats is confined to the clade consisting of the elaeniines, myiarchines, tyrannines and fluvicolines. This radiation correlates in time to the expansion of semi-open and open habitats from the mid-Miocene (c. 15 Mya) onwards. The pipromorphine, elaeniine and myiarchine–tyrannine–fluvicoline clades each employ distinct foraging strategies (upward striking, perch-gleaning and sallying, respectively), but the degree of diversity in morphology and microhabitat exploitation is markedly different between these clades. While the pipromorphines and elaeniines each are remarkably homogenous in morphology and exploit a restricted range of microhabitats, the myiarchine–tyrannine–fluvicoline clade is more diverse in these respects. This greater ecological diversity, especially as manifested in their success in colonizing a wider spectrum of open habitats, appears to be connected to a greater adaptive flexibility of the search-and-sally foraging behaviour.

  • 21.
    Reeve, Andrew Hart
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of DenmarkUniversity of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Museum für Naturkunde BerlinInstitut für Evolutions‐ und Biodiversitätsforschung Germany.
    Zahl Marki, Petter
    Division of Research Management University of Agder Kristiansand Norway.
    Batista, Romina
    Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia Campus II Petrópolis CEP Brazil;Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre Gothenburg Sweden.
    Olsson, Urban
    Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre Gothenburg Sweden;Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Göteborg Göteborg Sweden.
    Edmark, Veronica Nyström
    Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Jønsson, Knud Andreas
    Natural History Museum of DenmarkUniversity of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark.
    The Sulawesi Thrush ( Cataponera turdoides ; Aves: Passeriformes) belongs to the genus Turdus2021In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Asian and Australo-Papuan faunas meet and intermix across the islands of Wallacea. Untangling the origins and relationships of the species inhabiting these archipelagos is an ongoing project that has lasted for well over a century. In recent years, molecular phylogenetic studies have made considerable progress in clarifying the affinities of enigmatic Wallacean taxa, but taxonomic riddles remain, even in groups as well studied as birds. Such is the case with Sulawesi Thrush Cataponera turdoides, a scarce and elusive montane songbird whose taxonomic placement has remained controversial since its description. To determine the evolutionary relationships of this monotypic genus, we obtained a museum specimen and employed whole-genome resequencing to generate a multi-locus dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using UCEs, and individual mitochondrial and nuclear genes. We show that Cataponera is a true thrush of the large and geographically widespread genus Turdus. It belongs to a clade predominantly composed of migratory Palearctic species, but has no close relatives within that group. Sulawesi Thrush is one of only two members of the genus Turdus known to have crossed Wallace's Line to form resident populations.

  • 22.
    Sangster, George
    et al.
    Naturalis Biodiversity Center Leiden The Netherlands;Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Luksenburg, Jolanda A.
    Institute of Environmental Sciences Leiden University Leiden The Netherlands;Department of Environmental Science and Policy George Mason University Fairfax Virginia USA.
    Päckert, Martin
    Senckenberg Natural History Collections Dresden Dresden Germany.
    Roselaar, Cees S.
    Naturalis Biodiversity Center Leiden The Netherlands.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Integrative taxonomy documents two additional cryptic Erithacus species on the Canary Islands (Aves)2022In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 629-642Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Sundberg, Per
    et al.
    Andrade, Sonia
    Bartolomaeus, Thomas
    Beckers, Patrick
    von Döhren, Jörn
    Krämer, Daria
    Gibson, Ray
    Giribet, Gonzalo
    Herrera-Bachiller, Alfonso
    Junoy, Juan
    Kajihara, Hiroshi
    Kvist, Sebastian
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sun, Shi-Chun
    Thiel, Martin
    Turbeville, James
    Strand, Malin
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Zoology, P.O. Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The future of nemertean taxonomy (phylum Nemertea) — a proposal2016In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, ISSN 0300-3256, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 579-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Sundberg, Per
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Bachmann, Lutz
    Slagsvold, Tore
    Jacobson, Carl-Olof
    Untitled2007In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 229-230Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    A multi-gene phylogeny disentangles the chat-flycatcher complex (Aves: Muscicapidae)2010In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships among Palearctic-Oriental starlings and mynas (genera Sturnus and Acridotheres: Sturnidae)2008In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 469-481Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 26 of 26
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