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  • 1.
    Bosco, Laura
    et al.
    The Helsinki Lab of Ornithology, Finnish Museum of Natural History University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.
    Otterbeck, Andreas
    The Helsinki Lab of Ornithology, Finnish Museum of Natural History University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.
    Fransson, Thord
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för miljöforskning och övervakning. Department of Environmental Research and Monitoring Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Lindén, Andreas
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) Helsinki Finland.
    Piha, Markus
    Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) Helsinki Finland.
    Lehikoinen, Aleksi
    The Helsinki Lab of Ornithology, Finnish Museum of Natural History University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.
    Increasing winter temperatures explain body size decrease in wintering bird populations of Northern Europe—But response patterns vary along the spatioclimatic gradient2023Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, ISSN 1466-822X, Vol. 32, nr 12, s. 2100-2110Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 2. Chapman, Abbie S.A.
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för zoologi.
    Bates, Amanda E.
    sFDvent: A global trait database for deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna2019Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, nr 11, s. 1538-1551Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3. Faurby, S.
    et al.
    Morlo, M.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    CarniFOSS: A database of the body mass of fossil carnivores2021Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 30, s. 1958-1964Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation

    Body mass is one of the most important determinants of animal ecology. Unlike other important traits it is also readily inferable from fossils and it is therefore one of the only traits that can be directly analysed and compared between fossil and contemporary communities. Despite this, no comprehensive database of the body mass of larger clades of extinct species exists. Analysis of fossils has therefore been restricted to small clades or to smaller, potentially biased, subsets of species. We here describe CarniFoss, an open-access database of body masses of all 1,322 extinct species of non-pinniped Carnivoramorpha and two related extinct groups of carnivorous mammals, Hyaenodonta and Oxyaenidae.

    Main types of variables contained

    We gathered lengths of teeth of fossil and extant species and body mass for extant species and a few of the best-known fossil species. Following this we estimated body mass for all species through phylogenetic imputation.

    Spatial location and grain

    Global, terrestrial.

    Time period and grain

    We collected data on all known species within the focal groups. The known species all lived in the Palaeogene, Neogene or Quaternary (i.e., the last 66 Myr).

    Major taxa and level of measurement

    We searched for data on reported tooth size of all described species of Carnivoramorpha (excluding pinnipeds) and selected extinct related groups (Hyaenodonta and Oxyaenidae). We combined this with measured body mass for all extant species and inferred body mass based on long-bones for selected extinct species, as well as a species-level phylogeny including all extant and extinct species in the group, and inferred the body mass for all species using phylogenetic imputation.

    Software format

    Data are provided as a series of .csv files, with all metadata in a separate PDF file.

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  • 4.
    Kennedy, Jonathan D.
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark.
    Marki, Petter Z.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark;Division of Research Management University of Agder Kristiansand Norway.
    Reeve, Andrew H.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Museum für Naturkunde Berlin Leibniz Institut für Evolutions und Biodiversitätsforschung Berlin Germany.
    Prawiradilaga, Dewi M.
    Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense LIPI/The National Research and Innovation Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BRIN) Cibinong Science Center Cibinong Indonesia.
    Haryoko, Tri
    Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense LIPI/The National Research and Innovation Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BRIN) Cibinong Science Center Cibinong Indonesia.
    Koane, Bonny
    The New Guinea Binatang Research Centre Madang Papua New Guinea.
    Kamminga, Pepijn
    <idGroup xmlns="http://www.wiley.com/namespaces/wiley"> <id type="ringgold" value="4503"></id> </idGroup> Naturalis Biodiversity Center Leiden The Netherlands.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för bioinformatik och genetik. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden.
    Jønsson, Knud A.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Ø Denmark.
    Diversification and community assembly of the world’s largest tropical island2022Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 31, nr 6, s. 1078-1089Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The species diversity and endemism of tropical biotas are major contributors to global biodiversity, but the factors underlying the formation of these systems remain poorly understood.

    Location

    The world's largest tropical island, New Guinea.

    Time period

    Miocene to present.

    Major taxa studied

    Passerine birds.

    Methods

    We first generated a species-level phylogeny of all native breeding passerine birds to analyse spatial and elevational patterns of species richness, species age and phylogenetic diversity. Second, we used an existing dataset on bill morphology to analyse spatial and elevational patterns of functional diversity.

    Results

    The youngest New Guinean species are principally distributed in the lowlands and outlying mountain ranges, with the lowlands also maintaining the majority of non-endemic species. In contrast, many species occurring in the central mountain range are phylogenetically distinct, range-restricted, endemic lineages. Centres of accumulation for the oldest species are in montane forest, with these taxa having evolved unique bill forms in comparison to the remaining New Guinean species. For the morphological generalists, attaining a highland distribution does not necessarily represent the end to dispersal and diversification, because a number of new species have formed in the outlying mountain ranges, following recent colonization from the central range.

    Main conclusions

    We conclude that a general model of tropical montane diversification is that lineages commonly colonize the lowlands, shifting their ranges upslope through time to become range-restricted montane forest endemics, attaining novel functional adaptations to these environments.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
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  • 5. Loubota Panzou, Grace Jopaul
    et al.
    Santos, Karin
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för botanik.
    Pantropical variability in tree crown allometry2020Ingår i: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tree crowns determine light interception, carbon and water exchange. Thus, understanding the factors causing tree crown allometry to vary at the tree and stand level matters greatly for the development of future vegetation modelling and for the calibration of remote sensing products. Nevertheless, we know little about large‐scale variation and determinants in tropical tree crown allometry. In this study, we explored the continental variation in scaling exponents of site‐specific crown allometry and assessed their relationships with environmental and stand‐level variables in the tropics.LocationGlobal tropics.Time periodEarly 21st century.Major taxa studiedWoody plants.MethodsUsing a dataset of 87,737 trees distributed among 245 forest and savanna sites across the tropics, we fitted site‐specific allometric relationships between crown dimensions (crown depth, diameter and volume) and stem diameter using power‐law models. Stand‐level and environmental drivers of crown allometric relationships were assessed at pantropical and continental scales.ResultsThe scaling exponents of allometric relationships between stem diameter and crown dimensions were higher in savannas than in forests. We identified that continental crown models were better than pantropical crown models and that continental differences in crown allometric relationships were driven by both stand‐level (wood density) and environmental (precipitation, cation exchange capacity and soil texture) variables for both tropical biomes. For a given diameter, forest trees from Asia and savanna trees from Australia had smaller crown dimensions than trees in Africa and America, with crown volumes for some Asian forest trees being smaller than those of trees in African forests.Main conclusionsOur results provide new insight into geographical variability, with large continental differences in tropical tree crown allometry that were driven by stand‐level and environmental variables. They have implications for the assessment of ecosystem function and for the monitoring of woody biomass by remote sensing techniques in the global tropics.

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