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  • 1.
    Diez-del-Molino, David
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Unroll Please: Deciphering the Genetic Code in Scrolls and Other Ancient Materials2020In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 181, no 6, p. 1200-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unrelenting development of ancient DNA methods now allows researchers to obtain archaeogenetic data from increasingly diverse sources. In a new study in this issue of Cell, researchers apply the latest DNA technologies to unravel the mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls, one of the world’s most famous and influential sets of ancient parchments.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. Liu, S L
    et al.
    Westbury, M V
    Dussex, N
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Mitchell, K J
    Sinding, M H S
    Heintzman, P D
    Duchene, D A
    Kapp, J D
    von Seth, J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Heiniger, H
    Sanchez-Barreiro, F
    Margaryan, A
    Andre-Olsen, R
    De Cahsan, B
    Meng, G L
    Yang, C T
    Chen, L
    van der Valk, T
    Moodley, Y
    Rookmaaker, K
    Bruford, M W
    Ryder, O
    Steiner, C
    Bruins-van Sonsbeek, L G R
    Vartanyan, S
    Guo, C X
    Cooper, A
    Kosintsev, P
    Kirillova, I
    Lister, A M
    Marques-Bonet, T
    Gopalakrishnan, S
    Dunn, R R
    Lorenzen, E D
    Shapiro, B
    Zhang, G J
    Antoine, P O
    Dalen, L
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gilbert, M T P
    Ancient and modem genomes unravel the evolutionary history of the rhinoceros family2021In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 184, no 19, p. 4874-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Liu, Shiping
    et al.
    Lorenzen, Eline D.
    Fumagalli, Matteo
    Li, Bo
    Harris, Kelley
    Xiong, Zijun
    Zhou, Long
    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand
    Somel, Mehmet
    Babbitt, Courtney
    Wray, Greg
    Li, Jianwen
    He, Weiming
    Wang, Zhuo
    Fu, Wenjing
    Xiang, Xueyan
    Morgan, Claire C.
    Doherty, Aoife
    O’Connell, Mary J.
    McInerney, James O.
    Born, Erik W.
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dietz, Rune
    Orlando, Ludovic
    Sonne, Christian
    Zhang, Guojie
    Nielsen, Rasmus
    Willerslev, Eske
    Wang, Jun
    Population Genomics Reveal Recent Speciation and Rapid Evolutionary Adaptation in Polar Bears2014In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 157, no 4, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyper-lipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479-343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardiovascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans.

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