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  • 1.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The middle Miocene palynofloras of the Salihpaşalar lignite mine (Yatağan Basin, southwest Anatolia): environmental characterisationand comparison with palynofloras from adjacent basins2019In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the third part of an ongoing investigation of middle Miocene palynofloras in the Yatağan Basin (YB), southwestern Anatolia, thepalynofloras of the Salihpaşalar lignite mine in the main YB were studied. Seven types of algal spores, aplanospores/zygospores orcysts, six types of lycophyte and fern spores, 12 types of gymnosperm pollen and 90 types of angiosperm pollen were identified. Of atotal of ca. 140 plant taxa described from the YB, over 10% are confined to the Salihpaşalar assemblage. Differences between coevalpalynofloras of the Sekköy Member might reflect changing or prograding depositional environments. A number of rare accessorialtaxa reflect these local differences: Pilularia, Valeriana, Drosera and Persicaria aff. amphibia only occur at Salihpaşalar and aretypical of shallow water or temporary ponds associated with a lake shore. Apart from this, all the palynofloras, originating from thelignite seams and overlying limnic limestones (uppermost Turgut and Sekköy Member), of the YB are strongly indicative of extensivewoody vegetation with a dominance of diverse Fagaceae and Pinaceae. In addition, a list comparing the well-documented YBpalynomorphs to morphologically similar palynomorphs of published late early to middle Miocene plant assemblages of westernAnatolian was compiled. Such a comparison reveals that in many instances different taxon names have been used to denote the sametaxa. Hence, resolving these synonymies is a prerequisite of any meaningful comparison of palynofloras in the region.

  • 2. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.
    Herries, Andrew I. R.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bamford, Marion K.
    Berger, Lee R.,
    The carnivore guild circa 1.98 million years: biodiversity and implications for the palaeoenvironment at Malapa, South Africa2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Steininger, Christine
    Fossil Hyaenidae from Cooper’s Cave South Africa, and the palaeoenvironmental implications2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Pott, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Museum für Naturkunde Paläontologische Bodendenkmalpflege Sentruper Straße 285 48161 Münster.
    Sobbe, Ian H.
    Ancient Environments, Queensland Museum, PO Box 3300, South Brisbane, 4101 Qld, Australia, and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia 4072, Australia.
    The diversity of Australian Mesozoic bennettitopsid reproductive organs2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, p. 71-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several dispersed reproductive organs of bennettitopsid gymnosperms are described and illustrated from Triassic to Cretaceous strata of Australia: Williamsonia eskensis sp. nov. (Middle Triassic), Williamsonia ipsvicensis sp. nov. (Upper Triassic), Williamsonia durikaiensis sp. nov. (Lower Jurassic), Williamsonia sp. (Lower Jurassic), Williamsonia rugosa sp. nov. (Middle Jurassic), Williamsonia gracilis sp. nov. (Lower Cretaceous), Cycadolepis ferrugineus sp. nov. (Lower Jurassic), Cycadolepis sp. (Lower Cretaceous), and Fredlindia moretonensis Shirley 1898 comb. nov. (Upper Triassic). Among these, W. eskensis appears to represent the oldest bennettitalean reproductive structure yet identified. Although global floras expressed less provincialism during the Mesozoic and many genera are cosmopolitan, Australian bennettopsid species appear to have been endemic based on the morphological characters of the reproductive structures. Bennettopsids have a stratigraphic range of around 210 million years in Australia and are widely and abundantly represented by leaf fossils, but only around 20 specimens of reproductive structures, of which half are attributed to Fredlindia, have been recovered from that continent’s geological archive. The extremely low representation of reproductive organs vis-à-vis foliage is interpreted to reflect a combination of physical disintegration of the seed-bearing units while attached to the host axis and, potentially, extensive vegetative reproduction in bennettopsids growing at high southern latitudes during the Mesozoic.

  • 5. Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Jianguo, Li
    Wenben, Li
    Slater, Sam
    Zhu, Huaicheng
    Vajda, Vivi
    The Triassic to Early Jurassic palynological record of the TarimBasin, China2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Peng, Yungang
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Li, Jianguo
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Li, Wenben
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zhu, Huaicheng
    State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Triassic to Early Jurassic palynological record of the Tarim Basin, China2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tarim Basin, located in northwestern China, is an important oil-bearing region, and the extensive non-marine Mesozoic successions make this a key location for understanding environmental changes through the Triassic and Jurassic. Palynological analyses on samples from Lunnan-1 and Tazhong-1 drill cores from the northern and central part of the Tarim Basin reveal wellpreserved spore–pollen assemblages. Five palynological assemblages, i.e. Tarim Triassic 1 (TT1)–Tarim Triassic 4 (TT4) and Tarim Jurassic 1 (TJ1), spanning the Early Triassic to Early Jurassic were identified based on compositional changes, which are supported by ordination of samples using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). The Early Triassic assemblages possess abundant bryophytes and Densoisporites spp.-producers, which potentially represent a recovery succession following the end-Permian event. The Late Triassic spore–pollen assemblages are more similar to those of the North China Palynofloral Province compared to the South China Province. Based on our phytogeographic analysis, we propose that the western section of the boundary between the North and South China palynofloras should be placed at the southern margin of the Tarim Basin.

  • 7.
    Shevchuk, Olena
    et al.
    Institute of Geological Sciences, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Palynology of Jurassic (Bathonian) sediments from Donbas, northeast Ukraine2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A palynological and sedimentological study of an outcrop succession adjacent to the village of Kamyanka within the Kharkiv region of northeast Ukraine was carried out. The successions occur within the Dnieper–Donets Basin, which hosts vast successions (> 20 km) of post mid- Devonian strata and is one of the main hydrocarbonproducing basins in Europe. Middle Jurassic sandstones, siltstones and claystones represent the sedimentary successions at the Kamyanska locality. Few palynological studies have been performed on the Jurassic of Ukraine and even fewer presented in the international literature. Thirty spore taxa and 21 pollen taxa were identified, together with taxa kept in open nomenclature (e.g. bisaccate pollen). Two palynological assemblages were identified within the Kamyanska succession (assemblages A and B) dated as Bathonian. Assemblage A is dominated by the fern spores (Cyathidites and Osmundacidites) and gymnosperm pollen produced by Cupressaceae Perinopollenites elatoides), ginkgophytes/Cycadales/Bennettitales (monosulcates) and Cheirolepidiaceae (Classopollis). Assemblage B differs in also comprising high abundances of Gleicheniidites and higher percentages of Pinuspollenites and Araucariacites compared to assemblage A. Another difference between the two units is the high relative abundance of seed fern pollen (Alisporites) in the upper part of assemblage B. The thermal alteration index (TAI) of the palynomorphs is estimated to range from 3 to 3.5, indicating a burial depth corresponding to the mature main phase of liquid petroleum and, to some extent, gas generation. Comparisons between the miospore and macrofloral assemblages show that the palynoflora and macroflora are strongly similar at broad taxonomic levels. Importantly, the miospore assemblages described here compare well with European Middle Jurassic assemblages indicating limited provincialism, with similar vegetation extending from eastern Ukraine and across most of Western Europe.

  • 8.
    Slater, Sam M
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kustatscher, Evelyn
    Museum of Nature South Tyrol, Bindergasse/via Bottai 1, 39100 Bozen/Bolzano, Italy.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    An introduction to Jurassic biodiversity and terrestrial environments2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments is devoted to studies of Jurassic terrestrial floras. The special issue Jurassic biodiversity and terrestrial environments includes nine contributions that investigate plant fossils and their spores and pollen from a range of localities across the globe that stratigraphically span the Jurassic (Fig. 1). These papers are a collective contribution to the IGCP project 632: Continental crises of the Jurassic: Major extinction events and environmental changes within lacustrine ecosystems.

  • 9.
    Slater, Sam M
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wellman, Charles H
    Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Romano, Michael
    Sheffield, UK.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Dinosaur-plant interactions within a Middle Jurassic ecosystem—palynology of the Burniston Bay dinosaur footprint locality, Yorkshire, UK2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, p. 139-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dinosaur footprints are abundant in the Middle Jurassic Ravenscar Group of North Yorkshire, UK. Footprints are particularly common within the Bathonian Long Nab Member of the Scalby Formation and more so within the so called ‘Burniston footprint bed’ at Burniston Bay. The Yorkshire Jurassic is also famous for its exceptional plant macrofossil and spore-pollen assemblages. Here we investigate the spore-pollen record from the dinosaur footprint-bearing successions in order to reconstruct the vegetation and assess possible dinosaur-plant interactions. We also compare the spore-pollen assemblages with the macroflora of the Scalby Ness Plant Bed, which occurs within the same geological member as the Burniston succession. The spore-pollen assemblages are dominated by Deltoidospora spp., the majority of which were probably produced by Coniopteris. Lycophyte spores (including megaspores) are common in the Yorkshire Jurassic, but lycophyte parent plants are extremely poorly represented in the macroflora. Seed ferns, represented by Alisporites spp., are moderately abundant. Conifer pollen assemblages are dominated by Araucariacites australis (probably produced by Brachyphyllum mamillare), Perinopollenites elatoides and Classopollis spp., with additional bisaccate pollen taxa. Abundant Ginkgo huttonii in themacroflora suggests that much of the monosulcate pollen was produced by ginkgoes. The diverse vegetation of the Cleveland Basin presumably represented an attractive food source for herbivorous dinosaurs. The dinosaurs probably gathered at the flood plains for fresh-water and also used the non-vegetated plains and coastline as pathways. Although assigning specific makers to footprints is difficult, it is clear that a range of theropod, ornithopod and sauropod dinosaurs inhabited the area.

  • 10.
    Steinthorsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline
    School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Bacon, Karen L
    School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Cuticle surfaces of fossil plants as a potential proxy for volcanic SO2 emissions: observations from the Triassic-Jurassic transition of East Greenland2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 49-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flood basalt volcanism has been implicated in several episodes of mass extinctions and environmental degradation in the geological past, including at the Triassic–Jurassic (Tr–J) transition, through global warming caused by massive outgassing of carbon dioxide. However, the patterns of biodiversity loss observed are complicated and sometimes difficult to reconcile with the effects of global warming alone. Recently, attention has turned to additional volcanic products as potential aggravating factors, in particular sulphur dioxide (SO2). SO2 acts both directly as a noxious environmental pollutant and indirectly through forming aerosols in the atmosphere, which may cause transient global dimming and cooling. Here, we present a range of morphological changes to fossil plant leaf cuticle surfaces of hundreds of Ginkgoales and Bennettitales specimens across the Tr–J boundary of East Greenland. Our results indicate that morphological structures of distorted cuticles near the Tr–J boundary are consistent with modern cuticle SO2-caused damage and supported by recent leaf-shape SO2 proxy results, thus identifying cuticle surface morphology as a potentially powerful proxy for SO2. Recording the timing and duration of SO2 emissions in the past may help distinguish between the driving agents responsible for mass extinction events and thus improve our understanding of the Earth System.

  • 11. ČERŇANSKÝ, Andrej
    et al.
    SZYNDLAR, Zbigniew
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fossil squamate faunas from the Neogene of Hambach (northwestern Germany). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
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