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  • 1.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Wells, Alice
    New Caledonia's Trichoptera—present status of knowledge2019In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 14, p. 87-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Trichoptera recorded from New Caledonia were four species described by Kimmins in 1953, each in anew endemic genus. The diversity was increased to eight species with the publication by Sykora in 1967 of threenew species in two new genera and a fourth species in a previously established genus. Today, 239 valid species areknown from the country, representing 20 genera in 10 families. Analysis of published records for some 32,000Trichoptera specimens collected from 291 localities shows that the highest species diversity is in the SE part of theGrande Terre, and that species diversity is greatest at lower altitudes, i.e. 0–200 meters above sea level. We also seethat the three most frequently collected families (85% of the individuals) in the sampled material are Hydroptilidae(35%), followed by Hydropsychidae (27%), and Leptoceridae (22%). Phylogenetic analyses have demonstratedthat the first species to occupy the island and the earliest radiations took place on areas covered by ultrabasicsubstrate, which is poor in nutrients and rich in certain toxic heavy metals.

  • 2. KROH, ANDREAS
    et al.
    MOOI, RICH
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    <p><strong>On the spelling of <em>Antrechinus nordenskjoldi </em>(Echinodermata: Echinoidea)*</strong></p>2012In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    <p><strong>Ophiuroid (Echinodermata) systematics—where do we come from, where do we stand and where should we go?*</strong></p>2012In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Clark, Elizabeth G.
    Thuy, Ben
    Darroch, Simon A.F.
    Comparison of 2D SEM imaging with 3D micro-tomographic imaging for phylogenetic inference in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)2019In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 15, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Wells, Alice
    et al.
    Australian National Insect Collection, CSIRO.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Micro-caddisfly faunas of Australia and the southwest Pacific(Trichoptera, Hydroptilidae)2016In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 10, p. 439-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's distributions of faunal groups reflect historic events—geological and evolutionary, as well as dispersals, extinctionsand chance events. The extent to which each of these contributed to the hydroptilid faunas of mainland Australia,Tasmania, New Guinea, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Fiji and Vanuatu is explored by comparison of the faunal composition,geology and geography of Australia and these SW Pacific islands. Corroborative evidence is sought from othergroups, flora as well as fauna.

  • 6. Wells, Alice
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Dostine, Peter
    Why are so many species based on a single specimen?2019In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 14, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A considerable number of insect species, including Trichoptera, are described from a single specimen, also knownas a 'unique' or a 'singleton'. We ask the question of whether this reflects failure to consider variation and relatedspecies, lack of collecting effort, or true rarity. In an attempt to answer this question we examine the availableliterature and data on the Trichoptera of Tasmania and New Caledonia. We note a low level of taxonomicsynonymy among species in these faunas. Moreover, a significant proportion of species from Tasmania that werebased originally on singletons have been re-collected subsequently, but this is not true for New Caledonia. Thepossible significance of these figures is considered following examination of data on diversity and abundance ofHydroptilidae collected by regular, standardised light trapping over almost two years at a northern Australiantropical stream. We conclude that quite a large proportion of the Trichoptera species based on singletons are rare,valid species, but for others the appearance of rarity may be a consequence of inadequate collecting, particularbehavioural attributes of the species, including seasonality, and failure to consider fully the structural diversity ofrelated species. Lastly, we discuss briefly the consequences of rarity, apparent or real, on conservationmanagement.

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