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  • 1.
    Benoit, Julien
    et al.
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Kruger, Ashley
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Jirah, Sifelani
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Fernandez, Vincent
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Rubidge, Bruce
    University of the Witwatersrand.
    Palaeoneurology and palaeobiology of the dinocephalian Anteosaurus magnificus2021In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dinocephalians (Therapsida), some of the earliest amniotes to have evolved large body size, include the carnivorous Anteosauria and mostly herbivorous Tapinocephalia. Whilst the palaeoneurology of the Tapinocephalia has been investigated in Moschognathus whaitsi, that of the Anteosauria remains completely unknown. Here we used X-ray micro-Computed Tomography to study, for the first time, the palaeoneurology of Anteosaurus magnificus. Compared to Moschognathus, we reconstruct Anteosaurus as an agile terrestrial predator based on the enlarged fossa for the floccular lobe of the cerebellum and semicircular canals of the inner ear. A major difference between the two genera resides in the orientation of the braincase, as indicated by the angle between the long axis of the skull and the plane of the lateral semicircular canal. This angle is 25° in Anteosaurus, whereas it is 65° in Moschognathus, which suggests that the braincase of the latter was remodelled as an adaptation to head-butting. This is consistent with less cranial pachyostosis and the retention of a large canine in Anteosauria, which suggests that dentition may have been used for intraspecific fighting and display in addition to trophic interactions. The evolution of a thick skull, horns, and bosses in tapinocephalids parallels the evolutionary reduction of the canine, which lead to a shift of the agonistic function from the mouth to the skull roof, as observed in extant social ungulates. Similarly, tapinocephalians may have developed complex social behaviour.

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  • 2. Betts, Marissa, J.
    et al.
    Claybourn, Thomas M.
    Brock, Glenn, A.
    Jago, James, B.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Paterson, John, R.
    Shelly fossils from the lower Cambrian White Point Conglomerate, Kangaroo Island, South Australia2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 489-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Cambrian (Series 2) White Point Conglomerate (WPC) on Kangaroo Island, South Australia contains exoticclasts representing a diverse array of lithologies, including metamorphics, chert, sandstone, and abundant carbonates,notably archaeocyath-rich bioclastic limestone. Acetic acid digestion of the WPC bioclastic limestone clasts reveals adiverse shelly fauna. This assemblage includes abundant organophosphatic brachiopods such as Cordatia erinae Brockand Claybourn gen. et sp. nov., Curdus pararaensis, Eodicellomus elkaniformiis, Eohadrotreta sp. cf. E. zhenbaensis,Eoobolus sp., Kyrshabaktella davidii, and Schizopholis yorkensis. Additional shelly taxa include the solenopleurid trilobiteTrachoparia? sp., the tommotiids Dailyatia odyssei, Dailyatia decobruta Betts sp. nov., Kelanella sp., and Lapworthellafasciculata, spines of the bradoriid arthropod Mongolitubulus squamifer, and several problematica, such as Stoibostrombuscrenulatus and a variety of tubular forms. The upper age limit for the WPC is constrained by biostratigraphic data fromthe overlying Marsden Sandstone and Emu Bay Shale, which are no younger than the Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone(Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4). The shelly fossil assemblage from the WPC limestone clasts indicates an upper Dailyatiaodyssei Zone (= Pararaia tatei to lower P. janeae trilobite zones), equivalent to the Atdabanian–early Botoman of theSiberian scheme. This contrasts with the previously suggested late Botoman age for the limestone clasts, based on the diversearchaeocyath assemblage. The minor age difference between the WPC and its fossiliferous limestone clasts suggestsrelatively rapid reworking of biohermal buildups during tectonically-active phases of deposition in the Stansbury Basin.

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  • 3.
    Claybourn, Thomas
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Betts, Marissa
    Palaeoscience Research Centre, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale.
    Holmer, Lars
    Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology, Uppsala University.
    Bassett-Butt, Lucy
    Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology, Uppsala University.
    Brock, Glenn
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University.
    Camenellan tommotiids from the Cambrian Series 2 of East Antarctica: biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, and systematics2021In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, p. 207-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cambrian Series 2 shelly fossils from thick carbonate successions in East Antarctica have received limited systematic treatment through the 20th century. Described here are the East Antarctic camenellan tommotiids from the Shackleton Limestone in the Central Transantarctic Mountains and the Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range. This material comes from both newly sampled collections and incompletely described material from older collections. The assemblage supports correlation to the Dailyatia odyssei Zone and Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone of South Australia, with the newly examined specimens of Dailyatia decobruta from the Shackleton Limestone providing direct correlation to the Mernmerna Formation of the Ikara-Flinders Ranges and White Point Conglomerate of Kangaroo Island. These East Antarctic assemblages include five species referred to Dailyatia, in addition to an undetermined kennardiid species and fragments of the problematic Shetlandia multiplicata. The results further corroborate the notion that fossiliferous carbonate clasts found on King George Island were sourced from the same carbonate shelf as the Shackleton Limestone, with the taxon S. multiplicata found in both units. The Schneider Hills limestone in the Argentina Range has yielded sclerites of Dailyatia icari sp. nov., currently only known from this location. 

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  • 4.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Weaver, Patricia G.
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
    Ciampaglio, Charles N.
    Wright State University.
    A unique late Eocene coleoid cephalopod Mississaepia from Mississippi, USA: New data on cuttlebone structure, and their phylogenetic implications.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new family, Mississaepiidae, from the Sepia–Spirula branch of decabrachian coleoids (Cephalopoda), is erected on the basis of the following, recently revealed, morphological, ultrastructural and chemical traits of the cuttlebone in the late Eocene Mississaepia, formerly referred to Belosaepiidae: (i) septa are semi−transparent, largely chitinous (as opposed to all other recorded cephalopods having non−transparent aragonitic septa); (ii) septa have a thin lamello−fibrillar nacreous covering (Sepia lacks nacre altogether, Spirula has fully lamello−fibrillar nacreous septa, ectochochleate cephalopods have columnar nacre in septa); (iii) a siphonal tube is present in early ontogeny (similar to siphonal tube development of the Danian Ceratisepia, and as opposed to complete lack of siphonal tube in Sepiaand siphonal tube development through its entire ontogeny in Spirula); (iv) the lamello−fibrillar nacreous ultrastructure of septal necks (similar to septal necks in Spirula); (v) a sub−hemispherical protoconch (as opposed to the spherical protoconchs of the Danian Ceratisepia and Recent Spirula); (vi) conotheca has ventro−lateral extension in early ontogenetic stages (as opposed to Sepia that has no ventro−lateral extention of the conotheca and to Spirula that retains fully−developed phragmocone throughout its entire ontogeny). Chitinous composition of septa in Mississaepia is deduced from (i) their visual similarity to the chitinous semi−transparent flange of Sepia, (ii) angular and rounded outlines and straight compressive failures of the partial septa and mural parts of septa similar to mechanically−damaged dry rigid chitinous flange of Sepia or a gladius of squid, and (iii) organics consistent with −chitin preserved in the shell. The family Mississaepiidae may represent a unknown lineage of the Sepia–Spirulabranch of coleoids, a conotheca lacking a nacreous layer being a common trait of the shell of this branch. However, Mississaepiidae is placed with reservation in Sepiida because of similarities between their gross shell morphology (a cuttlebone type of shell) and inorganic−organic composition. In Mississaepia, as in Sepia, the shell contains up to 6% of nitrogen by weight; phosphatised sheets within the dorsal shield may have been originally organic, like similar structures in Sepia; accumulations of pyrite in peripheral zones of aragonitic spherulites and in−between the spherulites of the dorsal shield may also indicate additional locations of organics in the shell of living animal.

  • 5.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Summesberger, Herbert
    Department of Geology and Palaeontology, Museum of Natural History, Vienna, Burgring 7, Austria.
    Brandstaetter, Franz
    Mineralogical Department, Museum of Natural History, Vienna, Austria; Vienna, Burgring 7, Austria.
    Gruber, Daniela
    Core Facility of Cell Imaging and Ultrastructure Research, Life Sciences Faculty, University of Vienna, 1090 Wien Althanstraße 14, Austria.
    Tintori, Andrea
    Triassica, Institute for Triassic Lagerstätte, 23828 Periedo (LC), Via al Verder 6, Italy..
    Triassic coleoid beaks and other structures from the Calcareous Alps revisited2022In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 67, p. 655-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed comprehensive study of seven Carnian, Late Triassic specimens of a coleoid cephalopod Phragmoteuthis bisinuata, on which Suess based his hypothesis on “beaks of P. bisinuata”. Using SEM/EDS, we found that “beaks of P. bisinuata” consist of a micro-granular carbonized matrix containing ~4–30 μm diameter and ~50–200 μm visible length, dense calcified bone-like micro-structures. This strongly suggests that these objects are vertebrate bone-inducing cartilages in which the matrix was post-mortem reworked by carbon-accumulating bacteria and substituted by nano-particles of carbon accumulated in micro-granules. Hence, the presumed “beaks of P. bisinuata” are cartilaginous remains of a prey, presumably juvenile fish. This data dismissed the entire hypothesis of Seuss. A small spatula-shape plate with a rachis-like process in an association with 10 or so imprints around (arm crown), found in front of a proostracum of P. bisinuata evidences an unknown Late Triassic juvenile teuthid which possessed a gladius resembling that of the early Permian Glochinomorpha stifeli. It inhabited the open sea area of the northwestern Tethys Ocean, and was, along with juvenile fishes, in the diet of P. bisinuata. The first identified Anisian (Middle Triassic) coleoid beak is represented by an isolated specimen from the Gardena Valley, NE Italy. It has a typical composition and morphology of coleoid upper beak: chitinous, wide-oval lateral walls, short wings, and pointed hook-like rostrum. This suggests similar upper beak structure in the Carnian P. bisinuata in which the lower beaks were apparently similar to that of the co-occurring Lunzoteuthis schindelbergensis and had a widely open outer lamella with posteriorly elongated paired wings joined into a pointed rostrum in the anterior portion.

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  • 6.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Weaver, Patricia
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences; U.S.A..
    Ciampaglio, Charles
    Department of Geology, Wright State University−Lake Campus.
    A unique late Eocene coleoid cephalopod Mississaepia from Mississippi, USA: New data on cuttlebone structure, and their phylogenetic implications.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new family, Mississaepiidae, from the Sepia–Spirula branch of decabrachian coleoids (Cephalopoda), is erected on the basis of the following, recently revealed, morphological, ultrastructural and chemical traits of the cuttlebone in the late Eocene Mississaepia, formerly referred to Belosaepiidae: (i) septa are semi−transparent, largely chitinous (as opposed to all other recorded cephalopods having non−transparent aragonitic septa); (ii) septa have a thin lamello−fibrillar nacreous covering (Sepia lacks nacre altogether, Spirula has fully lamello−fibrillar nacreous septa, ectochochleate cephalopods have columnar nacre in septa); (iii) a siphonal tube is present in early ontogeny (similar to siphonal tube development of the Danian Ceratisepia, and as opposed to complete lack of siphonal tube in Sepia and siphonal tube development through its entire ontogeny in Spirula); (iv) the lamello−fibrillar nacreous ultrastructure of septal necks (similar to septal necks in Spirula); (v) a sub−hemispherical protoconch (as opposed to the spherical protoconchs of the Danian Ceratisepia and Recent Spirula); (vi) conotheca has ventro−lateral extension in early ontogenetic stages (as opposed to Sepia that has no ventro−lateral extention of the conotheca and to Spirula that retains fully−developed phragmocone throughout its entire ontogeny). Chitinous composition of septa in Mississaepia is deduced from (i) their visual similarity to the chitinous semi−transparent flange of Sepia, (ii) angular and rounded outlines and straight compressive failures of the partial septa and mural parts of septa similar to mechanically−damaged dry rigid chitinous flange of Sepia or a gladius of squid, and (iii) organics consistent with [1]−chitin preserved in the shell. The family Mississaepiidae may represent a unknown lineage of the Sepia–Spirula branch of coleoids, a conotheca lacking a nacreous layer being a common trait of the shell of this branch. However, Mississaepiidae is placed with reservation in Sepiida because of similarities between their gross shell morphology (a cuttlebone type of shell) and inorganic−organic composition. In Mississaepia, as in Sepia, the shell contains up to 6% of nitrogen by weight; phosphatised sheets within the dorsal shield may have been originally organic, like similar structures in Sepia; accumulations of pyrite in peripheral zones of aragonitic spherulites and in−between the spherulites of the dorsal shield may also indicate additional locations of organics in the shell of living animal.

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  • 7. Goñi, Iban
    et al.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Li, Luoyang
    Li, Guoxiang
    Betts, Marissa
    Dorjnamjaa, Dorj
    Altanshagai, Gundsambuu
    Enkhbaatar, Batkhuyag
    Topper, Timothy P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    New Palaeoscolecid plates from the Cambrian Stage 3 of northern Mongolia2023In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New material of disarticulated paleoscolecid remains have been found in “Small Shelly/Skeletal Fossils” assemblages from Cambrian Stage 3 extracted from a section in the Khubsugul Lake region of northern Mongolia. The current material is composed of isolated phosphatic plates, rendering the whole-body reconstruction and comparisons difficult. However, the morphology of the plates is unique enough to warrant description of a new genus and species Floraconformis egiinensis. The new taxon is characterised by a stellate depression network spreading from the middle that separates numerous elevations. Floraconformis egiinensis gen. et sp. nov. represents one of the oldest records of isolated palaeoscolecid plates.

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  • 8. Hryniewicz, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Amano, Kazutaka
    Bitner, Maria Aleksandra
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warszawa, Poland.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Klompmaker, Adiël A.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Robins, Cristina
    Kaim, Andrzej
    A late Paleocene fauna from shallow-water chemosynthesis-based ecosystems in Spitsbergen, Svalbard2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 101-141Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 9.
    Hryniewicz, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa.
    Amano, Kazutaka
    Department of Geoscience, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata.
    Jenkins, Robert
    School of Natural System, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa City, Ishikawa .
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous and Paleogene cold seeps2017In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a systematic study of thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous to Oligocene seep carbonates worldwide. Eleven species of thyasirid bivalves are identified belonging to three genera: Conchocele, Maorithyas, and Thyasira. Two species are new: Maorithyas humptulipsensis sp. nov. from middle Eocene seep carbonates in the Humptulips Formation, Washington State, USA, and Conchocele kiritachiensis sp. nov. from the late Eocene seep deposit at Kiritachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Two new combinations are provided: Conchocele townsendi (White, 1890) from Maastrichtian strata of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica, and Maorithyas folgeri (Wagner and Schilling, 1923) from Oligocene rocks from California, USA. Three species are left in open nomenclature. We show that thyasirids have Mesozoic origins and appear at seeps before appearing in “normal” marine environments. These data are interpreted as a record of seep origination of thyasirids, and their subsequent dispersal to non-seep environments. We discuss the age of origination of thyasirids in the context of the origin of the modern deep sea fauna and conclude that thyasirids could have deep sea origins. This hypothesis is supported by the observed lack of influence of the Cretaceous and Paleogene Oceanic Anoxic Events on the main evolutionary lineages of the thyasirids, as seen in several other members of the deep sea fauna.

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  • 10.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kiel, S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Palaeobiology Swedish Museum of Natural History Stockholm Sweden;Bolin Centre for Climate Research Stockholm University Stockholm Sweden.
    Goedert, James L.
    Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
    A new genus of chemosymbiotic vesicomyid bivalves from the Oligocene of western North America2022In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 67, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a new genus of the chemosymbiotic bivalve family Vesicomyidae, Squiresica, for two Oligocene species, previously assigned to Archivesica, from western North America. Squiresica is characterized by a small and weakly inflated shell, a small to nearly absent pallial sinus, an Archivesica-like hinge dentition, with an indistinct to well incised lunular incision. Two species are assigned to this new genus: the type species, S. knapptonensis from western Washington State, USA, and S. marincovichi from Oligocene strata of Alaska, USA. Squiresica knapptonensis had previously been described from the upper Oligocene of the Lincoln Creek Formation; further specimens are here reported from a newly discovered seep deposit in the lower Oligocene part of the Lincoln Creek Formation.

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  • 11.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kiel, Steffen
    A middle Eocene seep deposit with silicified fauna from the Humptulips Formation in western Washington State, USA2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 751-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonate blocks with silicified fossils were recovered from a newly recognized cold seep deposit, the Satsop  Weatherwax site, in the basal Humptulips Formation, along the West Fork of Satsop River in Washington State, USA. The petrography and the stable carbon isotope signature of the carbonate, with values as low as -43.5‰, indicate that these carbonate blocks formed at an ancient methane seep. The fossils recovered from this block include five vesicomyid specimens, two fragments of a thyasirid, five specimens of the peltospirid Depressigyra, two specimens of the hyalogyrinid Hyalogyrina, 25 specimens of the neritimorph Thalassonerita eocenica, and three limpet specimens of two different species. Five species can be described as new: Nuculana acutilineata (Nuculanoidea), Desbruyeresia belliatus (Provannidae), Provanna fortis (Provannidae), Orbitestella dioi (Orbitestellidae), and Leptochiton terryiverseni (Polyplacophora). Other fossils recovered from this site are numerous serpulid tubes, echinoid spines, one brachiopod fragment and two neogastropods. Almost all species recovered belong to extant genera and the fauna has a modern character, but are different from species found in younger seeps in Washington State. This is the first record of an orbitestellid from an ancient cold seep deposit, the first fossil provannids from the Humptulips Formation, and the first fossil record of Desbruyeresia from North America.

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  • 12. Jadwiszczak, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Aspects of diversity in early Antarctic penguins2011In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 13.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Three new bivalve genera from Triassic hydrocarbon seep deposits in southern Turkey2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 221-234Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 14.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Aguilar, Yolanda
    Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Kase, Tomoki
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo.
    Mollusks from Pliocene and Pleistocene seep deposits in Leyte, Philippines2020In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 65, p. 589-627Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 15.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Amano, Kazutaka
    Joetsu University of Education, Joetsu 943-8512, Japan.
    Goedert, James
    Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
    New taxa, records, and data for vesicomyid bivalves from Cenozoic strata of the North Pacific region2023In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 297-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New discoveries of Cenozoic deep-water hydrocarbon seep deposits and continued collecting at previously documented sites in the North Pacific region have resulted in additional fossils of vesicomyid bivalves and necessitate a systematic review. We report five new vesicomyid species, including four species from western Washington State, USA: Isorropodon humptulipsense sp. nov. from middle to upper Eocene strata of the Humptulips Formation and the “Siltstone of unit B”, the oldest record for Isorropodon, Pleurophopsis thieli sp. nov. from upper Eocene to lowermost Oligocene strata of the Lincoln Creek, Makah, and Pysht formations, and Pliocardia? guthrieorum sp. nov. and Squiresica plana sp. nov. from Oligocene strata of the Lincoln Creek and Pysht formations. The new species Squiresica yooni sp. nov. is from the Middle Miocene Duho Formation in South Korea. We report possibly the as-yet oldest Vesicomya from a lower Oligocene seep deposit in the Lincoln Creek Formation in western Washington. Pliocardia kawadai was previously only known from Lower to Middle Miocene strata in Japan; with our new record from the Lower to Middle Miocene Astoria Formation in western Washington, this species represents the first fossil vesicomyid species with a trans-Pacific distribution. The large and elongated Pleurophopsis chinookensis is restricted to upper Eocene strata; previous Oligocene records are shown to belong to other species.

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  • 16.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fernando, Allan
    National Institute of Geological Sciences, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City.
    Magtoto, Clarence
    National Institute of Geological Sciences, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City.
    Kase, Tomoki
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo.
    Mollusks from Miocene hydrocarbon-seep deposits in the Ilocos-Central Luzon Basin, Luzon Island, Philippines2022In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 917-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report 35 molluscan species from Late Miocene cold-seep carbonates from the Amlang Formation in the Ilocos- Central Luzon Basin in Luzon Island, Philippines, collected in a large quarry in the province of Pangasinan. The 19 bivalve species are largely representatives of chemosymbiotic families; the six new species are the nuculid Acila (Truncacila) interferencia sp. nov., the mytilid Bathymodiolus labayugensis sp. nov., the thyasirid Conchocele pangasinanensis sp. nov., the lucinid Megaxinus gorrospei sp. nov., the vesicomyid Pliocardia ballesterosi sp. nov., and Sisonia frijellanae gen. et sp. nov., of uncertain taxonomic affinity. The 16 gastropods include one species restricted to seep deposits, the neritid species Thalassonerita hagai sp. nov.; the buccinid Enigmaticolus semisulcata represents the first fossil record of its genus. Biogeographically, the Pangasinan seep fauna shows several links to Neogene seep faunas in other tropical/subtropical areas, namely the Mediterranean and Caribbean regions. In contrast, shared taxa with nearby but extratropical Japan are few, as are shared taxa with Miocene seep deposits in New Zealand.

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  • 17.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hyžný, Matúš
    Klompmaker, Adiël A.
    Mollusks and a crustacean from early Oligocene methane-seep deposits in the Talara Basin, northern Peru2020In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 65, p. 109-138-Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 18.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sami, Marco
    Taviani, Marco
    A serpulid-Anodontia-dominated methane-seep deposit from the Miocene of northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 19.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sami, Marco
    Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali, 51, Via Medaglie D’Oro 51, 48018 Faenza, Italy.
    Taviani, Marco
    Institute of Marine Sciences, Italian National Research Council, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy; and Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Unusual Miocene hydrocarbon-seep faunas from the Brisighella area in northern Italy: embedded in clastics and first records of the lucinid bivalves Megaxinus and Miltha2023In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ancient hydrocarbon-seep sites known as “Calcari a Lucina” are common in Miocene strata of northern Italy and typically consist of carbonate deposits dominated by large lucinid, bathymodiolin, and vesicomyid bivalves. Here we report two new sites found in Upper Miocene strata at Monte Mauro near Brisighella in the Emilia-Romagna province. One is unusual by being embedded in unconsolidated siltstone without any carbonate, but yet, consisting of the typical, seep-restricted bivalves Bathymodiolus moroniae and Archivesica aharoni vesicomyid clams and bathymodiolin mussels. The second deposit is dominated by the lucinid Megaxinus bellardianus, which has never been reported from a Miocene seep deposit in this region, despite being common in coeval siliciclastic sediments nearby. This species emphasizes biogeographic relationships between Upper Miocene seep faunas in the Mediterranean region and the tropic Indo-West Pacific Ocean.

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  • 20.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taviani, Marco
    Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the late Pliocene Stirone River hydrocarbon seep complex in northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 557-568Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 21. KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 22.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Alexander, Ruaridh
    Grant Institute, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, James Hutton Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FE, UK.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bower, Fred
    Grant Institute, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, James Hutton Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FE, UK.
    Clausen, Sébastien
    Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, CNRS, UMR 8198-Evo-Eco-Paleo, F-59000 Lille, France.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology, Uppsala University, Villavägen 16, SE-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kolesnikov, Kirill
    Department of Biological Evolution, Faculty of Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1(12), Moscow 119234, Russia.
    Korovnikov, Igor
    Trofimuk Institute of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademika Koptyuga 3, 630090, Novosibirsk, Russia.
    Pavlov, Vladimir
    Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, Bol’shaya Gruzinskaya ul. 10(1), Moscow 123242, Russia and Kazan Federal University, ul. Kremlyovskaya 18, Kazan 420008, Russia.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ushatinskaya, Galina
    Borissiak Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya ul. 123, 117997 Moscow, Russia.
    Wood, Rachel
    Grant Institute, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, James Hutton Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FE, UK.
    Zhuravlev, Andrey
    Department of Biological Evolution, Faculty of Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1(12), Moscow 119234, Russia.
    Lower–Middle Cambrian faunas and stratigraphy from northern Siberia2022In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 67, p. 341-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New assemblages of skeletal fossils chemically extracted from carbonates of the Cambrian Stage 2–Drumian Stage are reported from the lower reaches of the Lena River as well as from the Khorbusuonka, Malaya Kuonamka, and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers in northern part of the Siberian Platform. The fauna studied with scanning electron microscopy includes brachiopods, molluscs, hyoliths, halkieriids, chancelloriids, tommotiids, lobopodians, palaeoscolecidans, bradoriids, echinoderms, anabaritids, hyolithelminths, and sponges showing similarity to previously described fossil assemblages from Siberia, Laurentia, and Gondwana. The material includes emended descriptions of Halkieria proboscidea, Hadimopanella knappologica, Archaeopetasus typicus, and first descriptions of Hadimopanella foveata Kouchinsky sp. nov. and Archaeopetasus pachybasalis Kouchinsky sp. nov. Affinity of Archaeopetasus to chancelloriids is suggested. Finding of an in-place operculum in a planispiral shell of Michniakia minuta enables reinterpretation of this form as a hyolith, not a mollusc. The cambroclavids Cambroclavus sp. and Zhijinites clavus and the earliest echinoderms belonging to the Rhombifera and Ctenocystoidea are reported respectively from the lower Botoman stage and Botoman–Toyonian transitional beds, correlated with Cambrian Stage 4. Carbon isotopes are analysed from sections of the Chuskuna (upper Kessyusa Group), Erkeket, Kuonamka, Olenyok, Yunkyulyabit-Yuryakh, Tyuser and Sekten formations. A major part ofthe δ13C record is obtained from the Cambrian Stage 4–Drumian Stage strata which remain incompletely characterised by chemostratigraphy. The Lower Anomocarioides limbataeformis Carbon isotope Excursion (LACE) from the Drumian Stage of the Khorbusuonka River is introduced herein. New chemostratigraphic data are used for regional and global correlation and facilitate study of the evolutionary development of animals and faunas through the “Cambrian explosion”.

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  • 23.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Clausen, Sébastien
    Université de Lille.
    Vendrasco, Michael J.
    California State University, Fullerton, CA.
    An early Cambrian fauna of skeletal fossils from the Emyaksin Formation, northern Siberia.2015In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 421-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of mineralised skeletal fossils containing molluscs, hyoliths, halkieriids, chancelloriids, tommotiids, lobopodians, paleoscolecids, bradoriids, echinoderms, anabaritids, hyolithelminths, hexactinnelid, and heteractinid sponges is described from the early Cambrian Emyaksin Formation exposed along the Malaya Kuonamka and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers, eastern flanks of the Anabar Uplift, northern Siberian Platform. The sampled succession is attributed to the Tommotian–Botoman Stages of Siberia and correlated with Stage 2 of Series 1–Stage 4 of Series 2 of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian. Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy is applied herein for regional correlation. The fauna contains the earliest Siberian and probably global first appearances of lobopodians, paleoscolecids, and echinoderms, and includes elements in common with coeval faunas from Gondwana, Laurentia, and Baltica. For the first time from Siberia, the latest occurrence of anabaritids is documented herein from the Atdabanian Stage. Problematic calcium phosphatic sclerites of Fengzuella zhejiangensis have not been previously known from outside China. The sellate sclerites, Camenella garbowskae and mitral sclerites, C. kozlowskii are unified within one species, C. garbowskae. In addition to more common slender sclerites, Rhombocorniculum insolutum include broad calcium phosphatic sclerites. A number of fossils described herein demonstrate excellent preservation of fine details of skeletal microstructures. Based on new microstructural data, sclerites of Rhombocorniculum are interpreted as chaetae of the type occurring in annelids. A new mollusc Enigmaconus? pyramidalis Kouchinsky and Vendrasco sp. nov. and a hyolith Triplicatella papilio Kouchinsky sp. nov. are described.

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  • 24.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Landing, Ed
    New York State Museum.
    Steiner, Michael
    Freie Universität Berlin.
    Vendrasco, Michael
    Pasadena City College.
    Ziegler, Karen
    University of New Mexico.
    Terreneuvian stratigraphy and faunas from the Anabar Uplift, Siberia.2017In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 311-440Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 25.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Stefen, Clara
    The castorid Steneofiber from NW Germany and its implications for the taxonomy of Miocene beavers2010In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 26.
    Pott, C
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The Triassic flora of Svalbard2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, p. 709-740Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    The problematic early Cambrian fossil Tumulduria incomperta represents the detached ventral interarea of a paterinid brachiopod.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organophosphatic early Cambrian (Terreneuvian, Cambrian Stage 2) fossil Tumulduria incomperta has been problematic ever since its original description in 1969. Comparison of abundant specimens from the Lower Cambrian of Siberia with co-occurring brachiopod valves show that T. incomperta represents the central portion of the ventral interarea of a paterinid brachiopod similar to Cryptotreta neguertchenensis, and that the domed central portion of typical Tumulduria specimens represents the ridge-like pseudodeltidium of the interarea.

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    Skovsted_etal_2014_Tumulduria
  • 28.
    Topper, Timothy P.
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Balthasar, Uwe
    University of Glasgow.
    Harper, David A.T.
    The oldest brachiopods from the lower Cambrian of South Australia2013In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphology and organophosphatic shell structure of the paterinate brachiopod Askepasma is documented using new and previously collected specimens from the lower Cambrian of South Australia. Lack of adequately preserved material has seen the majority of paterinate specimens previously reported from South Australia referred to the genus Askepasma and treated under open nomenclature. Large collections of paterinates from the lower Cambrian Wilkawillina, Ajax, and Wirrapowie limestones in the Arrowie Basin, South Australia have prompted redescription of the type species Askepasma toddense and the erection of a new species, Askepasma saproconcha sp. nov. Askepasma saproconcha sp. nov. currently represents the oldest known brachiopod from the lower Cambrian successions in South Australia with a FAD in pre−trilobitic (Terreneuvian, Cambrian Stage 2, lower Atdabanian) strata in the basal part of the Wilkawillina and Wirrapowie limestones. Askepasma toddense predominantly occurs in Abadiella huoi Zone equivalent strata (Unnamed Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3, middle–upper Atdabanian) in the upper part of the lower Wilkawillina, Wirrapowie, and Ajax limestones. The shell microstructure of Askepasma suggests a proximal stem group position within the Brachiopoda and similarities with tommotiid taxa provides further evidence that the ancestry of crown group brachiopods is firmly entrenched within the Tommotiida.

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  • 29. Wesley-Hunt, Gina D.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Basicranial morphology and phylogenetic position of the upper Eocene carnivoramorphan Quercygale.2005In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 50, p. 837-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quercygale angustidens is a small, early carnivoramorphan from the upper Eocene of northwest Europe including the Phosphorites du Quercy, France. Although there is extensive material of the genus, very little has been published on the auditory region which is an important character complex for taxonomy and phylogenetic studies. This paper presents a detailed description of the basicranium of an undistorted partial skull of Quercygale. The new data form the basis for a phylogenetic analysis of Quercygale in the context of basal carnivoramorphan interrelationships. Quercygale has a mix of derived and plesiomorphic characters. The promontorium is highly derived, and unlike that of any other “miacoid”. Yet, based on the evidence from surrounding bones the bulla does not appear to be as expanded as in other closely related miacids. In the phylogenetic analysis Quercygale is the sister−taxon to Nimravidae and crown−group Carnivora, and it appears to be the most derived of the stem−group Miacidae. We discuss the implications that the position of Quercygale has on carnivoramorphan phylogenetics.

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