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  • 1. Anand, Rajagopal
    et al.
    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Mezger, Klaus
    Neoarchean crustal growth by accretionary processes: Evidence from combined zircon–titanite U–Pb isotope studies on granitoid rocks around the Hutti greenstone belt, eastern Dharwar Craton, India2014In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 79, p. 72-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neoarchean Hutti greenstone belt hosts mesothermal gold deposits and is surrounded by granitoid rocks on all sides. Combined U–Pb dating of zircon and titanite from the granitoid rocks constrains their emplacement history and subsequent geologic evolution. The Golapalli and Yelagatti granodiorites occurring to the north of the Hutti greenstone belt were emplaced at 2569 ± 17 Ma. The Yelagatti granodiorite yielded a younger titanite age of 2530 ± 6 Ma which indicates that it was affected by a post-crystallization thermal event that exceeded the titanite closure temperature. The western granodiorites from Kardikal have identical titanite and zircon ages of 2557 ± 6 Ma and 2559 ± 19 Ma, respectively. The eastern Kavital granodiorites yielded titanite ages of 2547 ± 6 Ma and 2544 ± 24 Ma which are identical to the published U–Pb zircon SHRIMP ages. These ages imply that the granitoid rocks surrounding the Hutti greenstone belt were formed as discrete batholiths within a short span of ca. 40 Ma between 2570 Ma and 2530 Ma ago. They were juxtaposed by horizontal tectonic forces against the supracrustal rocks that had formed in oceanic settings at the end of the Archean. The first phase of gold mineralization coincided with the last phase of granodiorite intrusion in the Hutti area. A metamorphic overprint occurred at ca. 2300 Ma ago that reset the Rb–Sr isotope system in biotites and possibly caused hydrothermal activity and enrichment of Au in the ore lodes. The eastern Dharwar Craton consists of quartz monzodiorite–granodiorite–granite suites of rocks that are younger than the greenstone belts that are older than ~2650 Ma reported from earlier studies. The granitoid magmatism took place between 2650 and 2510 Ma ago indicating accretionary growth of the eastern Dharwar Craton.

  • 2. Ng, S.W.P.
    et al.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Roselee, M.H.
    Teschner, C.
    Murtadha, S.
    Oliver, G.J.
    Ghani, A.A.
    Chang, S.C.
    Late Triassic granites from Bangka, Indonesia: a continuation of the Main Range granite province of the South-East Asian Tin Belt.2017In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 138, p. 548-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The South-East Asian Tin Belt is one of the most tin-productive regions in the world. It comprises three north-south oriented granite provinces, of which the arc-related Eastern granite province and the collision-related Main Range granite province run across Thailand, Singapore, and Indonesia. These tin-producing granite provinces with different mineral assemblages are separated by Paleo-Tethyan sutures exposed in Thailand and Malaysia. The Eastern Province is usually characterised by granites with biotite ± hornblende. Main Range granites are sometimes characterised by the presence of biotite ± muscovite. However, the physical boundary between the two types of granite is not well-defined on the Indonesian Tin Islands, because the Paleo-Tethyan suture is not exposed on land there. Both hornblende-bearing (previously interpreted as I-type) and hornblende-barren (previously interpreted as S-type) granites are apparently randomly distributed on the Indonesian Tin Islands. Granites exposed on Bangka, the largest and southernmost Tin Island, no matter whether they are hornblende-bearing or hornblende-barren, are geochemically similar to Malaysian Main Range granites. The average ɛNd(t) value obtained from the granites from Bangka (average ɛNd(t) = −8.2) falls within the range of the Main Range Province (−9.6 to −5.4). These granites have SIMS zircon U-Pb ages of ca. 225 Ma and ca. 220 Ma, respectively that are both within the period of Main Range magmatism (∼226–201 Ma) in the Peninsular Malaysia. We suggest that the granites exposed on Bangka represent the continuation of the Main Range Province, and that the Paleo-Tethyan suture lies to the east of the island.

  • 3.
    Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology.
    Li, Jianguo
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zhang, Qianqi
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology.
    Zhu, Huaicheng
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Triassic vegetation and climate evolution on the northern margin of Gondwana: a palynological study from Tulong, southern Xizang (Tibet), China2019In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 175, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present vegetation reconstructions based on an almost complete succession through the Triassic of Tulong, Nyalam County, southern Xizang (Tibet), China. The Permian and earliest Triassic samples were barren of palynomorphs, however, in overlying strata we identified well-preserved and diverse miospore assemblages. Seven pollen and spore zones spanning the Olenekian to the Rhaetian were recognized. These palynological zones were amalgamated into three floral stages that comprise distinct vegetation types: (1) an early Olenekian lycophyte dominated flora with common pteridosperms, indicative of a warm and dry climate; (2) a late Olenekian transitional flora composed of abundant conifers with low abundances of lycophytes, signifying a decrease in temperature and increase in humidity; (3) a Middle to Late Triassic mature conifer-dominated flora with diverse sphenophytes, ferns and cycadophytes, indicative of a stable, temperate and humid climate. The changes in vegetation and climate tentatively correlate with the rifting of northern Gondwana, suggesting that regional tectonics was a contributive driving factor to local floral community change.

  • 4.
    Vajda, Vivi
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bercovici, Antoine
    Cui, Ying
    Yu, Jianxin
    Forel, Marie-Béatrice
    Terrestrial paleoenvironment characterization across the Permian–Triassic boundary in South China2015In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, ISSN 1367-9120, E-ISSN 1878-5786, Vol. 98, p. 225-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-preserved marine fossils in carbonate rocks permit detailed studies of the end-Permian extinction event in the marine realm. However, the rarity of fossils in terrestrial depositional environments makes it more challenging to attain a satisfactory degree of resolution to describe the biotic turnover on land. Here we present new sedimentological, paleontological and geochemical (X-ray fluorescence) analysis from the study of four terrestrial sections (Chahe, Zhejue, Mide and Jiucaichong) in Western Guizhou and Eastern Yunnan (Yangtze Platform, South China) to evaluate paleoenvironmental changes through the Permian–Triassic transition.

    Our results show major differences in the depositional environments between the Permian Xuanwei and the Triassic Kayitou formations with a change from fluvial–lacustrine to coastal marine settings. This change is associated with a drastic modification of the preservation mode of the fossil plants, from large compressions to small comminuted debris. Plant fossils spanning the Permian–Triassic boundary show the existence of two distinct assemblages: In the Xuanwei Formation, a Late Permian (Changhsingian) assemblage with characteristic Cathaysian wetland plants (mainly Gigantopteris dictyophylloides, Gigantonoclea guizhouensis, G. nicotianaefolia, G. plumosa, G. hallei, Lobatannularia heinanensis, L. cathaysiana, L. multifolia, Annularia pingloensis, A. shirakii, Paracalamites stenocostatus, Cordaites sp.) is identified. In the lowermost Kayitou Formation, an Early Triassic (Induan) Annalepis–Peltaspermum assemblage is shown, associated with very rare, relictual gigantopterids. Palynological samples are poor, and low yield samples show assemblages almost exclusively represented by spores. A ∼1 m thick zone enriched in putative fungal spores was identified near the top of the Xuanwei Formation, including diverse multicellular forms, such as Reduviasporonites sp. This interval likely corresponds to the PTB “fungal spike” conventionally associated with land denudation and ecosystem collapse. While the floral turnover is evident, further studies based on plant diversity would be required in order to assess contribution linked to the end-Permian mass extinction versus local paleoenvironmental changes associated with the transition between the Xuanwei and Kayitou formations.

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