Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Farris, James S.
    et al.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Crowe, Timothy M.
    Lipscomb, Diana
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Frigatebirds, Tropicbirds and Ciconiida: Excesses of Confidence Probability1999In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Houshuai, Wang
    et al.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Holloway, Jeremy D
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fan, Xiaoling
    Janzen, Daniel H
    Hallwachs, Winnie
    Wen, Lijun
    Wang, Min
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University.
    Molecular phylogeny of Lymantriinae (Lepidoptera, Noctuoidea, Erebidae) inferred from eight gene regions2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 579-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand the evolutionary history of Lymantriinae and test the present higher-level classification, we performed the first broad-scale molecular phylogenetic analysis of the subfamily, based on 154 exemplars representing all recognized tribes and drawn from all major biogeographical regions. We used two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and 16S ribosomal RNA) and six nuclear genes (elongation factor-1α, carbamoylphosphate synthase domain protein, ribosomal protein S5, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and wingless). Data matrices (in total 5424 bp) were analysed by parsimony and model-based evolutionary methods (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference). Based on the results of the analyses, we present a new phylogenetic classification for Lymantriinae composed of seven well-supported tribes, two of which are proposed here as new: Arctornithini, Leucomini, Lymantriini, Orgyiini, Nygmiini, Daplasini trib. nov. and Locharnini trib. nov. We discuss the internal structure of each of these tribes and address some of the more complex problems with the genus-level classification, particularly within Orgyiini and Nygmiini.

  • 3.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Phylogeny of the symphytan grade of Hymenoptera: new pieces into the old jigsaw(fly) puzzle2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 31, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hymenoptera constitutes one of the largest, and ecologically and economically most important, insect orders. During thepast decade, a number of hypotheses on the phylogenetic relationships among hymenopteran families and superfamilies have beenpresented, based on analyses of molecular and/or morphological data. Nevertheless, many questions still remain, particularly concerningrelationships within the hyperdiverse suborder Apocrita, but also when it comes to the evolutionary history of the ancestrallyherbivorous “sawfly” lineages that form the basal, paraphyletic grade Symphyta. Because a large part of the uncertaintyappears to stem from limited molecular and taxonomic sampling, we set out to investigate the phylogeny of Hymenoptera usingnine protein-coding genes, of which five are new to analyses of the order. In addition, we more than tripled the taxon coverageacross the symphytan grade, introducing representatives for many previously unsampled lineages. We recover a well supportedphylogenetic structure for these early herbivorous hymenopteran clades, with new information regarding the monophyly of Xyelidae,the placement of the superfamily Pamphilioidea as sister to Tenthredinoidea + Unicalcarida, as well as the interrelationshipsamong the tenthredinoid families Tenthredinidae, Cimbicidae, and Diprionidae. Based on the obtained phylogenies, and to preventparaphyly of Tenthredinidae, we propose erection of the tribe Heptamelini to family status (Heptamelidae). In particular, ourresults give new insights into subfamilial relationships within the Tenthredinidae and other species-rich sawfly families. Thee xpanded gene set provides a useful toolbox for future detailed analyses of symphytan subgroups, especially within the diversesuperfamily Tenthredinoidea.

  • 4. Morinière, Jérôme
    et al.
    Michat, Mariano
    Jäch, Manfred
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Balke, Michael
    Anisomeriini diving beetles – an Atlantic-Pacific Island disjunction on Tristan da Cunha and Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández?2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anisomeriini diving beetles contain only two enigmatic species, representing a remarkable disjunction between the Pacific Juan Fernández Islands (Anisomeria bistriata) and the South Atlantic Tristan da Cunha Archipelago (Senilites tristanicola). They belong to the Colymbetinae, which contain 140 species worldwide. Here we aim to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the Anisomerinii and use > 9000 bp DNA sequence data from 13 fragments of 12 loci for a comprehensive sampling of Colymbetinae species. Analyses under different optimization criteria converge on very similar topologies, and show unambiguously that Anisomeria bistriata andSenilites tristanicola belong to the Neotropical Rhantus signatus species group, a comparatively recent clade within Colymbetinae. Anisomeriini therefore are synonomized with Colymbetini and both species are transferred to Rhantus accordingly, resulting in secondary homonymy of Rhantus bistriatus (Brullé, 1835) with Rhantus bistriatus (Bergsträsser, 1778). We propose the replacement name Rhantus selkirki Jäch, Balke & Michat nom. nov. for the Juan Fernández species. Presence of these species on remote islands is therefore not relictary, but the result of more recent range expansions out of mainland South America. Finally, we suggest that Carabdytini should be synonymized with Colymbetini. Our study underpins the Hennigian principle that a natural classification can be derived only from the search for shared apomorphies between species, not from differences.

  • 5. Prieto, Maria
    et al.
    Baloch, Elisabeth
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mazaedium evolution in the Ascomycota (Fungi) and the classification of mazaediate groups of formerly unclear relationship2013In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 29, p. 296-308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Ramsköld, L.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The phylogeny and evolution of some phacopid trilobites1991In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 7, p. 29-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tullberg, Birgitta
    A comparison of two methods to study correlated discrete characters on phylogenetic trees1996In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 11, p. 265-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a simulation approach to study two methods proposed for the analysis of correlated discrete characters on cladograms, the concentrated changes test (CCT) and the contingent states test (CST). Both of these consider the case where there is an independent and a dependent character and assign probabilities to various events in the dependent character given one or the other state of the independent character. The CCT gives different results for symmetric and asymmetric cladograms. In the latter case, the proportion of branches reconstructed as having the derived state has less influence on the resulting probabilities. The CST is only sensitive to the proportion of derived branches, regardless of whether the tree is symmetric or asymmetric. The CCT calculates probabilities by considering character state reconstructions which are not allowed by parsimony algorithms, thereby increasing the probability of rejecting a true null hypothesis (type I error rate). We discuss some alternative questions that could be studied using these tests and also derive equations for calculating the number of possible events in the dependent character for unresolved parts of the phylogeny.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf