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  • 1.
    Bouchal, Johannes M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Denk, Thomas (Contributor)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kallanxhi, Mădălina-Elena (Contributor)
    The Pleistocene flora of Bezhan, southeast Albania: early appearance of extant tree species2019In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The piggyback basin of Bezhan, southeastern Albania, was formed during the late Neogene and contains Pliocene/Pleistocene deposits. These continental deposits consist of marls, siltstones and clays separated by a thin series of lignite-seams alternating with clays (Bezhan formation). We investigated leaf fossils and dispersed pollen from marls of the upper portion of this formation. Fifty-two plant taxa comprising algae, gymnosperms, and angiosperms were recovered. Of these, at least 19% belong to extant species and less than 16% belong to taxa today extinct in western Eurasia. Tsuga is represented by three pollen taxa with affinities to modern Chinese, Japanese, and North American species. Herbaceous taxa indicative of steppe (Artemisia, Amaranthaceae) occur in low quantities (≤1%) suggesting an interglacial setting. Four vegetation units are recognised: Wet riparian and aquatic vegetation, mesic oak forest, dry sub-Mediterranean woodland, and montane conifer forest. A comparison of the Bezhan flora with well-dated Pliocene and Pleistocene floras of Italy suggests a Calabrian (late early Pleistocene) age for the upper unit. This estimate is based on the abundance of extant taxa, the absence of subtropical taxa, and threshold values of particular taxa (Tsuga, Carya). The findings are in agreement with age estimates for extant tree species from molecular studies.

  • 2. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO,, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    A new sawshark, Pristiophorus laevis, from the Eocene of Antarctica with comments on Pristiophorus lanceolatus2016In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Skates and Rays (Elasmobranchii, Batomorphii) from the Eocene La Meseta and Submeseta formations, Seymour Island, Antarctica2019In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature for Mammalian post-canine dentitions2017In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental wear facets on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars are traces of their main function, themastication and therefore reflect masticatory movements and also paramasticatory (i.e. non-dietary useof teeth) behavior. Here we present the Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature applicable to most mammaliandentitions. Topographic positions of wear facets in relation to the major cusps and crests of the teeth areused to designate the areas of the occlusal surface the facets occupy (e.g. their mesial, distal, lingual, orbuccal position). Previous published systems for labeling wear facets have been inconsistent with eachother. Therefore, we provide a synoptic review of the most widely-used terminologies, and introducethe alternative Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature. This nomenclature aims to overcome the difficultiescaused by the existing inconsistent wear facet terminologies. Our new approach is applicable to dentitionswhere the occlusal morphology does not change significantly for most of the lifetime of the animal. Inthose dentitions, the primary occlusal surfaces are not significantly modified as wear facets become moreextensive with wearing. This appears to be a common pattern in pre-tribosphenic, tribosphenic molars,and the teeth derived from tribosphenic precursors (e.g. bunodont molar morphologies). In teeth wherethe secondary occlusal surface is functionally intensely modified (i.e. high-crowned and evergrowingteeth with large areas of dentine exposed) any facet labeling system appears to be challenging, since theidentification of individual facets is blurred and their spatial position may be indeterminable.

  • 5.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    FLINK, Therese
    Large apeomyine rodents (Mammalia, Eomyidae) from the early Miocene of Echzell, Germany2018In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dental material described in this paper was collected from fossiliferous ash layers of the Vogelsberg volcanic complex at Echzell, Germany. It consists of 32 teeth of a new large Apeomys species, Apeomys oldrichi n. sp., and 19 teeth of Megapeomys lindsayi Fejfar, Rummel and Tomida. Both species are extremely rare faunal elements in the early Miocene of Europe. Apeomys oldrichi n. sp. is the largest known Apeomys species, and occurs in a number of MN 3 – 4 sites in southern Germany and Czech Republic. Megapeomys lindsayi, the largest Eurasian apeomyine, was described on the basis of a single lower premolar. Herein both lower and upper cheek teeth as well as the lower deciduous premolar are described for the first time. In comparison with related populations from other localities, the evolutionary stage of the two apeomyine species clearly indicates a middle Orleanian age (MN 4) for Echzell which concurs with previous studies.

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