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  • 1. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Sangster, George
    Dalvi, Shashank
    Round, Philip D.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Le Manh, Hung
    Lei, Fumin
    Olsson, Urban
    Multiple species within the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex revealed through an integrative taxonomic approach2019In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re-evaluated the taxonomy of the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex using molecular, morphological and vocal analyses. The extensive seasonal, sexual, age-related, geographical and taxon-specific variation in this complex has never before been adequately studied. As no previous genetic or vocal analyses have focused on this group, misinterpretation of taxonomic signals from limited conventional morphological study alone was likely. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we found that P. crinigera sensu lato (s.l.) comprises two non-sister groups of taxa (Himalayan crinigera and Chinese striata groups) that differ substantially morphologically and vocally and that are broadly sympatric in Yunnan Province, China. Prinia polychroa cooki (Myanmar) and P. p. rocki (southern Vietnam) are each morphologically, vocally and genetically distinct. Thai, Cambodian and Laotian populations formerly ascribed to P. p. cooki are morphologically and vocally most similar to and most closely related to Javan P. p. polychroa, and require a new name, proposed here. Prinia p. bangsi of Yunnan is part of the crinigera group rather than of P. polychroa, and hence there is no evidence for sympatry between P. polychroa s.l. and P. crinigera s.l., nor of the occurrence of P. polychroa in mainland China or Taiwan. We recommend the recognition of five species in the complex, with the following suggestions for new English names: Himalayan Prinia P. crinigera sensu stricto (s.s.; with subspecies striatula, crinigera, yunnanensis and bangsi); Chinese Prinia P. striata (subspecies catharia, parumstriata and striata); Burmese Prinia P. cooki (monotypic); Annam Prinia P. rocki (monotypic) and Deignan’s Prinia P. polychroa s.s. (subspecies Javan polychroa and the new Southeast Asian taxon). This study underlines the importance of using multiple datasets for the elucidation of diversity of cryptic bird species and their evolutionary history and biogeography.

  • 2. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Sangster, George
    Dalvi, Shashank
    Round, Philip D.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Le Manh, Hung
    Lei, Fumin
    Olsson, Urban
    Multiple species within the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera–Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex revealed through an integrative taxonomic approach2020In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 936-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re‐evaluated the taxonomy of the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera–Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex using molecular, morphological and vocal analyses. The extensive seasonal, sexual, age‐related, geographical and taxon‐specific variation in this complex has never before been adequately studied. As no previous genetic or vocal analyses have focused on this group, misinterpretation of taxonomic signals from limited conventional morphological study alone was likely. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we found that P. crinigera sensu lato (s.l.) comprises two non‐sister groups of taxa (Himalayan crinigera and Chinese striata groups) that differ substantially morphologically and vocally and that are broadly sympatric in Yunnan Province, China. Prinia polychroa cooki (Myanmar) and P. p. rocki (southern Vietnam) are each morphologically, vocally and genetically distinct. Thai, Cambodian and Laotian populations formerly ascribed to P. p. cooki are morphologically and vocally most similar to and most closely related to Javan P. p. polychroa, and require a new name, proposed here. Prinia p. bangsi of Yunnan is part of the crinigera group rather than of P. polychroa, and hence there is no evidence for sympatry between P. polychroa s.l. and P. crinigera s.l., nor of the occurrence of P. polychroa in mainland China or Taiwan. We recommend the recognition of five species in the complex, with the following suggestions for new English names: Himalayan Prinia P. crinigera sensu stricto (s.s.; with subspecies striatula, crinigera, yunnanensis and bangsi); Chinese Prinia P. striata (subspecies catharia, parumstriata and striata); Burmese Prinia P. cooki (monotypic); Annam Prinia P. rocki (monotypic) and Deignan's Prinia P. polychroa s.s. (subspecies Javan polychroa and the new Southeast Asian taxon). This study underlines the importance of using multiple datasets for the elucidation of diversity of cryptic bird species and their evolutionary history and biogeography.

  • 3. Fjeldsa, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    The Cinnamon Ibon Hypocryptadius cinnamomeus is a forest canopy sparrow2010In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 152, no 4, p. 747-760Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Zoological Museum Natural History Museum Copenhagen University Universitetsparken 15 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark;Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Dinesen, Lars
    Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Davies, Owen R.
    Department of Biological Sciences DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology University of Cape Town Rondebosch 7701 South Africa.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics Swedish Museum of Natural History PO Box 50007 Stockholm 10405 Sweden.
    Krabbe, Niels K.
    Zoological Museum Natural History Museum Copenhagen University Universitetsparken 15 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Hansen, Louis A.
    Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate GLOBE Institute University of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 15, Building 3 Copenhagen Oe DK‐2100 Denmark.
    Bowie, Rauri C. K.
    Department of Biological Sciences DST/NRF Centre of Excellence at the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology University of Cape Town Rondebosch 7701 South Africa;Department of Integrative Biology Museum of Vertebrate Zoology University of California 3101 Valley Life Science Building Berkeley CA 94720‐3160 USA.
    Description of two new Cisticola species endemic to the marshes of the Kilombero floodplain of southwestern Tanzania2021In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 163, no 4, p. 1330-1354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of two undescribed cisticola warblers in the marshes of the Kilombero floodplain in central Tanzania has been known since the 1980s and these putative new species have been illustrated in field guides on African birds, although with no formal name. Here we name both species, based on two museum specimens collected in 1961 and recently detected in a museum collection. We use these specimens to provide formal descriptions of each form and, using DNA sequence data extracted from these specimens, we place them in a broad phylogenetic framework for the genus Cisticola. The phylogenetic placement indicates that one of the new species is nested within a group of plain-backed duetting cisticolas and the other within the streak-backed marsh cisticolas. We use our own and public recordings to characterize the vocal repertoire of each of these new species and compare song characteristics with other members of their respective clades. Dating of nodes in the molecular phylogeny suggests that both cisticolas endemic to the Kilombero became isolated and diverged from their sister-species between 2.5 and 3.5 million years ago, long after the formation of the Eastern Arc Mountains and the Malawi Rift. We propose that both species should be classified as globally endangered, owing to immense anthropogenic pressures on the floodplain, as documented in several publications and by a recent Ramsar Advisory Mission.

  • 5.
    Irestedt, Martin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Gelang, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sangster, George
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Olsson, Urban
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Alstrom, Per
    Neumann's Warbler Hemitesia neumanni (Sylvioidea): the sole African member of a Palaeotropic Miocene avifauna2011In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. James, Helen F
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Slikas, Beth
    Lei, Fumin
    Gill, Frank B
    Olson, Storrs L
    Pseudopodoces humilis, a misclassified terrestrial tit (Paridae) of the Tibetan Plateau: evolutionary consequences of shifting adaptive zones2003In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pseudopodoces humilis (Hume's Ground-Jay) is a small passerine bird that inhabits the high rocky steppes of the Tibetan (Qinghai–Xizang) Plateau. Although it was long classified as a small species of ground jay (Podoces), two previous anatomical studies cast doubt on its assignment to the Corvidae (crows and jays). We studied the evolutionary relationships of Pseudopodoces using three independent datasets drawn from comparative osteology, the nuclear c-myc gene, and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. All three datasets agree on the placement of Pseudopodoces in the family Paridae (tits and chickadees). The cytochrome b data further suggest that Pseudopodoces may be closest to the Great Tit Parus major species group. Pseudopodoces is the only species of parid whose distribution is limited to treeless terrain. Its evolutionary relationships were long obscured by adaptations to open habitat, including pale, cryptic plumage; a long, decurved bill for probing in crevices among rocks or in the ground; and long legs for terrestrial locomotion. Despite these accommodations to a novel adaptive zone, its evolutionary affinity with the Paridae is clearly expressed in comparative osteology and genetics, and is supported by its habit of nesting in cavities.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Blom, Mozes
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the extinct Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences2018In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 160, p. 666-672Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the world´s smallest passerine, the Pygmy Bushtit Psaltria exilis2016In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 158, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ohlson, Jan I
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Nuclear DNA from a 180-year-old study skin reveals the phylogenetic position of the Kinglet Calyptura Calyptura cristata (Passeriformes: Tyrannides)2012In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 533-541Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Sangster, George
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Roselaar, Cees S.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Sillem’s Mountain Finch Leucosticte sillemi is a valid species of rosefinch (Carpodacus, Fringillidae)2016In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 158, no 1, p. 184-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The phylogenetic position of the Black-collared Bulbul Neolestes torquatus2010In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 386-392Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 11 of 11
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