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  • 1.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Monitoring of contaminants and their effects on the common Guillemot and the White-tailed sea eagle2015In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ericson, Per G P
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Olson, Storrs L.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Alvarenga, Herculano
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Circumscription of a monophyletic family for the tapaculos (Aves: Rhinocryptidae)2010In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 151, no 2, p. 337-345Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Molecular data reveal some major adaptational shifts in the early evolution of the most diverse avian family, the Furnariidae2005In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 146, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A robust phylogeny estimate for the family Furnariidae (sensu lato) was obtained using sequences of two nuclear introns and one mitochondrial gene (cyt b). Contrary to the widely accepted sister-group relationship of ovenbirds (Furnariinae) and woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptinae), a basal clade is suggested for Sclerurus and Geositta, while Xenops, hitherto considered an aberrant ovenbird, was found to occupy a basal position on the woodcreeper lineage. The morphological variation is re-interpreted in view of this revised phylogenetic hypothesis. Presumably, the remarkable adaptive radiation in this family started as primitive, Sclerurus-likes forms, which used the tail as a prop during terrestrial feeding, lured up to seek food on tree-trunks. The two basal woodcreeper genera, Xenops and then Glyphorynchus, show strong cranial specializations for hammering in wood, thus presenting a remarkable parallelism with the family Picidae, Xenops resembling a piculet, Glyphorynchus, a diminutive woodpecker. However, this specialization was lost in other woodcreepers, which show a more normal passerine skull, adapted for probing and prying in tree-trunk crevices and sallying for escaping insects. The ovenbirds developed a more flexible (rhynchokinetic) bill, well suited for probing and retrieving hidden prey in dead-leaf clusters and debris suspended in the vegetation, and in epiphyte masses. Adaptations to live in open terrain are secondary.

  • 4. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lokugalappatti, L.G. Sampath
    Bowie, Rauri
    Diversification of African greenbuls in space and time: linking ecological and historical processes2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, no suppl. 2, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Haase, Martin
    et al.
    Höljte, Henriette
    Blahy, Beate
    Bridge, Damon
    Henne, Eberhard
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kaldma, Katrin
    Khudyakov, Ekaterina A
    King, Amy
    Leito, Aivar
    Mewes, Wolfgang
    Mudrik, Elena A.
    Ojaste, Ivar
    Politov, Dmitry V. 
    Popken, Ronald
    Rinne, Juhani
    Stanbury, Andrew
    Tofft, Jesper
    Väli, Ülo
    Schmitz Ornés, Angela
    Shallow genetic population structure in an expanding migratory bird with high breeding site fidelity, the Western Eurasian Crane Grus grus grus2019In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 160, p. 965-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than half a century, the Western Eurasian Crane (Grus grus grus) has been expanding its range toward western Europe, recolonizing areas where it had been previously driven to extinction, including the UK, the Netherlands and Denmark. The Western Eurasian Crane is, on the one hand, a very mobile, migratory species, but on the other, is territorial and shows high breeding site fidelity. Hence, its genetic population structure is subject to antagonizing forces, which have different consequences. Based on the genotyping of six highly variable microsatellite loci, we inferred the population structure of the Western Eurasian Crane from samples from eight regions. We integrated classic F-statistics including analyses of molecular variance with a priori designation of structure and divisive clustering approaches, i.e. a Bayesian procedure (STRU CTU RE) and discriminant analysis of principal components, which infer structure a posteriori. According to the F-statistics, populations were only weakly differentiated, and the majority of the genetic variance (> 90%) was attributed to individuals. At first glance, the divisive approaches appeared to agree in finding four clusters. Yet, there was no correspondence regarding the composition of the clusters and none of the results were biologically meaningful. However, STRU CTU RE delivered an alternative interpretation, designating the highest likelihood to a scenario without subdivision, in clear agreement with the findings based on the F-statistics. In conclusion, the Western Eurasian Crane is genetically largely homogeneous, probably as a consequence of the rapid growth and range expansion of its population.

  • 6.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Vila, Carlos
    Department of Evolutionary Biology,.
    Morphological and genetic sex identification of white-tailed eagleHaliaeetus albicilla nestlings2007In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 148, p. 435-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the sex of bird nestlings is relevant to studies of behaviour and ecology and is often a central issue in the management of endangered or captive populations. The white-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla is a formerly threatened Eurasian raptor which is closely monitored in many countries due to its high exposure to environmental pollutants in the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of sex identification methods for white-tailed eagle nestlings based on morphological measurements that can be recorded at the nest by a single person and with minimum disturbance. The sex of each bird was independently determined using molecular (genetic) methods. One measure of tarsus width allowed the correct identification of sex for 96% of the nestlings from southern and central Sweden. However, we found that the criteria for sex identification were not directly applicable to the population in Swedish Lapland, where nestlings are typically thinner, probably due to a limited food supply. These results show that sexing in the field of white-tailed eagle nestlings can be feasible with high accuracy based on a limited number of measurements. However, the criteria employed to separate sexes may have to be adjusted for each population.

  • 7. Johnsen, Arild
    et al.
    Rindal, Eirik
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zuccon, Dario
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Kerr, Kevin C. R.
    Stoeckle, Mark Y.
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    DNA barcoding of Scandinavian birds reveals divergent lineages in trans-Atlantic species2010In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 151, no 3, p. 565-578Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Stach, Robert
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Jakobsson, Sven
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Migration routes and timing in a bird wintering in South Asia, the Common Rosefinch Carpodacus erythrinus2016In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 157, p. 671-679Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 8 of 8
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