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  • 1.
    Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Li, Jianguo
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Li, Wenben
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zhu, Huaicheng
    State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    The Triassic to Early Jurassic palynological record of the Tarim Basin, China2018In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608, Vol. 98, p. 7-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tarim Basin, located in northwestern China, is an important oil-bearing region, and the extensive non-marine Mesozoic successions make this a key location for understanding environmental changes through the Triassic and Jurassic. Palynological analyses on samples from Lunnan-1 and Tazhong-1 drill cores from the northern and central part of the Tarim Basin reveal wellpreserved spore–pollen assemblages. Five palynological assemblages, i.e. Tarim Triassic 1 (TT1)–Tarim Triassic 4 (TT4) and Tarim Jurassic 1 (TJ1), spanning the Early Triassic to Early Jurassic were identified based on compositional changes, which are supported by ordination of samples using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). The Early Triassic assemblages possess abundant bryophytes and Densoisporites spp.-producers, which potentially represent a recovery succession following the end-Permian event. The Late Triassic spore–pollen assemblages are more similar to those of the North China Palynofloral Province compared to the South China Province. Based on our phytogeographic analysis, we propose that the western section of the boundary between the North and South China palynofloras should be placed at the southern margin of the Tarim Basin.

  • 2.
    Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology and Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    New species of Kuqaia from the Lower Jurassic of Sweden indicates a possible water flea (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) affinity2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 6, article id e0282247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enigmatic acid-resistant mesofossil genus Kuqaia isemended, anew species (Kuqaia scanicus) isinstituted, and three established species are described from the Lower Jurassic (lower Pliensbachian) ofthe Ka ̈ vlinge BH-928 core, insouthern Sweden. Kuqaia has adistribution across the middle northern latitudes ofPangaea and isrestricted toLower tolower Middle Jurassic strata. Morphological characters support Kuqaia being the ephippia (resting egg/embryo cases) ofCladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda), and aprobable early stemgroup taxon ofthe Daphnia lineage. The paleoecology ofthe small planktonic crustaceans indicate purely fresh-water environments, such as lakes orponds, all occurrences being in continental deposits, and the Kuqaia specimens possibly represent dry-season resting eggs. Chemical analyses ofthese and similar fossils, and ofextant invertebrate eggs and egg cases are recommended toimprove resolution ofthe biological affiliations ofsuch mesofossil groups.

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    Peng et al_2023_New species of Kuqaia from the Lower Jurassic of Sweden indicates a possible
  • 3.
    Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. aState Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology and Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    A review of the Triassic pollen Staurosaccites: systematic and phytogeographical implications2021In: Grana, ISSN 0017-3134, E-ISSN 1651-2049, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 407-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staurosaccites, a highly distinctive pollen genus, ranges from the late Anisian (Pelsonian; Middle Triassic) to the Norian, at low tomid latitudes, globally. Here we review the systematic taxonomy and spatial and temporal ranges of Staurosaccites. We provide anemendation to S. tharipatharensis, synonymise S. minutus with the type species S. quadrifidus, and retain the species S. quadrifidus, S. tharipatharensis, S. densus and S. marginalis. Following comparison with morphologically similar pollen and environmental reconstructions of the habitat of its parent plant, we hypothesise that Staurosaccites was produced by a conifer that was likely adapted to warm and humid conditions. Based on occurrences of diagnostic taxa for the Onslow and Ipswich microfloral provinces in the Southern Hemisphere (Staurosaccites, Camerosporites, Enzonalasporites, Infernopollenites and Ovalipollis), we show that these palynofloras were established in the Middle Triassic. Our findings further suggest that, based on the presence of diagnostic taxa in western Laurasia and their absence in eastern Laurasia, western and eastern Laurasia represent different palynofloral provinces in the Middle Triassic.

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  • 4.
    Peng, Jungang
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. aState Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology and Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing.
    Slater, Sam M
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Megaspores from the Late Triassic‒Early Jurassic of southern Scandinavia: taxonomic and biostratigraphic implications2021In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 143, no 2-3, p. 202-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we investigate megaspores from 10 Triassic‒Jurassic localities of southern Sweden and Bornholm, Denmark, based on collections housed in the Swedish Museum of Natural History. We identify and describe 19 megaspore taxa belonging to three stratigraphically constrained assemblages, representing the Rhaetian, Hettangian and Pliensbachian, respectively. Megaspores are abundant and diverse (12 taxa) in the Rhaetian assemblage. Diversity markedly decreases across the Triassic–Jurassic boundary (TJB), with species richness reducing from 12 to two taxa. The Hettangian assemblage is well-preserved but depauperate, and is overwhelmingly dominated by Nathorstisporites hopliticus. A subsequent recovery of lycopsid diversity followed, recorded by an increase in richness to six taxa in the Pliensbachian assemblage. The disappearance of the hygrophilous and diverse heterosporous lycophyte communities acrossthe TJB, suggests a shift to drier conditions in the earliest Jurassic. This is supported by lithological changes from coal-forming environments in the Rhaetian to sandstone-dominated fluvial-estuarine facies in the Hettangian. Throughout this study, we analysed the megaspores using fluorescence microscopy, which revealed detailed morphological features on specimens that were otherwise opaque under visible light. This non-destructive technique is particularly useful for examining opaque megaspores embedded in permanent mounting media, such as epoxy resin, and may provide new insights into historical megaspore collections elsewhere.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
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