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  • 1.
    ACOSTA HOSPITALECHE, Carolina
    et al.
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata, Argentina.
    HAGSTRÖM, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata and Instituto Antártico Argentino (Dirección Nacional del Antártico), 25 de mayo 1143, San Martín, Argentina.
    Historical perspective of Otto Nordenskjöld´s Antarctic fossil penguin collection and Carl Wiman’s contribution2017In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 364-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early explorer and scientist Otto Nordenskjöld, leader of the Swedish South Polar Expedition of 1901–1903, was the first to collect Antarctic penguin fossils. The site is situated in the northeastern region of Seymour Island and constitutes one of the most important localities in the study of fossilised penguins. The task of describing these specimens together with fossilised whale remains was given to Professor Carl Wiman (1867–1944) at Uppsala University, Sweden. Although the paradigm for the systematic study of penguins has changed considerably over recent years, Wiman's contributions are still remarkable. His establishment of grouping by size as a basis for classification was a novel approach that allowed them to deal with an unexpectedly high morphological diversity and limited knowledge of penguin skeletal anatomy. In the past, it was useful to provide a basic framework for the group that today could be used as ‘taxon free’ categories. First, it was important to define new species, and then to establish a classification based on size and robustness. This laid the foundation for the first attempts to use morphometric parameters for the classification of isolated penguin bones. The Nordenskjöld materials constitute an invaluable collection for comparative purposes, and every year researchers from different countries visit this collection.

  • 2.
    Bomfleur, Benjamin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ferraguti, Marco
    Dipartimento di Bioscienze, Universita` degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy.
    Reguero, Marcelo
    Divisio´n Paleontologı´a de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fossilized spermatozoa preserved in a 50-myr-old annelid cocoon from Antarctica2015In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 11, no 20150431, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin and evolution of clitellate annelids—earthworms, leeches and their relatives—is poorly understood, partly because body fossils of these delicate organisms are exceedingly rare. The distinctive egg cases (cocoons) of Clitellata, however, are relatively common in the fossil record, although their potential for phylogenetic studies has remained largely unexplored. Here, we report the remarkable discovery of fossilized spermatozoa preserved within the secreted wall layers of a 50-Myr-old clitellate cocoon from Antarctica, representing the oldest fossil animal sperm yet known. Sperm characters are highly informative for the classification of extant Annelida. The Antarctic fossil spermatozoa have several features that point to affinities with the peculiar, leech-like ‘crayfish worms’ (Branchiobdellida). We anticipate that systematic surveys of cocoon fossils coupled with advances in non-destructive analytical methods may open a new window into the evolution of minute, soft-bodied life forms that are otherwise only rarely observed in the fossil record.

  • 3. BUONO, Monica
    et al.
    FERNANDEZ, Martha
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    MARENSSI, Sergio
    SANTILLANA, Sergio
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Eocene basilosaurid whales from the La Meseta Formation, Marambio (Seymour) Island, Antarctica2016In: Ameghiniana, ISSN 0002-7014, E-ISSN 1851-8044, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 296-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basal fully aquatic whales, the basilosaurids are worldwide known from Bartonian–Priabonian localities, indicating that this group was widely distributed during the late middle Eocene. In the Northern Hemisphere, fossils of basilosaurids are abundant, while records in the Southern Hemisphere are scarce and, in some cases (i.e., Antarctica), doubtful. The presence of basilosaurids in Antarctica was, until now, uncertain because most of the records are based on fragmentary materials that preclude an accurate assignment to known archaeocete taxa. Here we report the findings of mandibles, teeth, and innominate bone remains of basilosaurids recovered from the La Meseta Formation (TELM 4 Lutetian–Bartonian and; TELM 7 Priabonian), in Marambio (Seymour) Island (James Ross Basin, Antarctic Peninsula). These findings confirm the presence of Basilosauridae in the marine realm of Antarctica, increasing our knowledge of the paleobiogeographic distribution of basilosaurids during the middle–late Eocene. In addition, one of these records is among the oldest occurrences of basilosaurids worldwide, indicating a rapid radiation and dispersal of this group since at least the early middle Eocene.

  • 4. DOGUZHAEVA, Larisa
    et al.
    BENGTSON, Stefan
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    An Eocene orthocone from Antarctica shows convergent evolution of internally shelled cephalopods2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0172169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Subclass Coleoidea (Class Cephalopoda) accommodates the diverse present-day internally shelled cephalopod mollusks (Spirula, Sepia and octopuses, squids, Vampyroteuthis) and also extinct internally shelled cephalopods. Recent Spirula represents a unique coleoid retaining shell structures, a narrow marginal siphuncle and globular protoconch that signify the ancestry of the subclass Coleoidea from the Paleozoic subclass Bactritoidea. This hypothesis has been recently supported by newly recorded diverse bactritoid-like coleoids from the Carboniferous of the USA, but prior to this study no fossil cephalopod indicative of an endochochleate branch with an origin independent from subclass Bactritoidea has been reported.

    Methodology/Principal findings

    Two orthoconic conchs were recovered from the Early Eocene of Seymour Island at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. They have loosely mineralized organic-rich chitin-compatible microlaminated shell walls and broadly expanded central siphuncles. The morphological, ultrustructural and chemical data were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant and extinct taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS).

    Conclusions/Significance

    Our study presents the first evidence for an evolutionary lineage of internally shelled cephalopods with independent origin from Bactritoidea/Coleoidea, indicating convergent evolution with the subclass Coleoidea. A new subclass Paracoleoidea Doguzhaeva n. subcl. is established for accommodation of orthoconic cephalopods with the internal shell associated with a broadly expanded central siphuncle. Antarcticerida Doguzhaeva n. ord., Antarcticeratidae Doguzhaeva n. fam., Antarcticeras nordenskjoeldi Doguzhaeva n. gen., n. sp. are described within the subclass Paracoleoidea. The analysis of organic-rich shell preservation of A. nordenskjoeldi by use of SEM/EDS techniques revealed fossilization of hyposeptal cameral soft tissues. This suggests that a depositional environment favoring soft-tissue preservation was the factor enabling conservation of the weakly mineralized shell of A. nordenskjoeldi.

  • 5. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO,, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    A new sawshark, Pristiophorus laevis, from the Eocene of Antarctica with comments on Pristiophorus lanceolatus2016In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica2017In: Journal of South American Earth Sciences, ISSN 0895-9811, E-ISSN 1873-0647Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    New carcharhiniform sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the early to middle Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula2017In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Revision of Eocene Antarctic carpet sharks (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes) from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Skates and Rays (Elasmobranchii, Batomorphii) from the Eocene La Meseta and Submeseta formations, Seymour Island, Antarctica2019In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    FRIIS, Else Marie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    IGLESIAS, Ari
    Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Ambiente INIBIOMA (CONICET-UNCO), San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    División Paleontología de Vertebrados, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata – CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Notonuphar antarctica, an extinct water lily (Nymphaeales) from the Eocene of Antarctica2017In: Plant Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 0378-2697, E-ISSN 1615-6110, Vol. 303, no 7, p. 969-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new genus and species, Notonuphar antarctica, is described from the Eocene of Seymour (Marambio) Island, the Antarctic Peninsula and assigned to the Nymphaeales based on well-preserved seeds. This is the first record of a water lily from Antarctica and the first record of a Gondwanan plant with close link to the genus Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae), which is restricted today to the Northern Hemisphere. Critical features for systematic placement of Notonuphar are the presence of a germination cap with closely spaced hilar scar and micropyle, anatropous, bitegmic and exotestal seed organization, exotesta composed of one cell layer of high sclerenchymatic palisade-shape cells, mesotesta of smaller, low parenchymatic cells, a few cell layers deep, and a thin tegmen. The seeds of Notonuphar are particularly similar to seeds of extant and fossil Nuphar in the straight, unfolded anticlinal wall of the exotestal cells and the presence of a narrow zone of exotestal tissue between hilum and micropyle. Other seed features including the very tall exotestal cells and strongly thickened cell walls of exotesta also link Notonuphar to Brasenia and related fossil taxa (Cabombaceae). This character mosaic observed in Notonuphar corroborates the transitional position of Nuphar between Cabombaceae and Nymphaeaceae. Notonuphar is the only member of Nymphaeales recorded from Antarctica and so far the only fossil seeds of Nymphaeales known from the Southern Hemisphere. The discovery of this extinct Gondwanan taxon with features suggesting close relationship with extant Northern Hemisphere genus Nuphar is a further evidence for the relictual nature of the extant group.

  • 11. Gelfo, Javier
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lorente, Malena
    López, Guillermo
    Reguero, Marcelo
    The oldest mammals from Antarctica, early Eocene of La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island2014In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 58, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hara, Urszula
    et al.
    Polish Geologi cal Institute – Nati onal Research Institute.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcelo A.
    Museo de La Plata, Di vi sion Paleontol ogia de Vertebrados.
    Eocene bryozoan assemblages from the La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctica2018In: Geological Quarterly, ISSN 1641-7291, E-ISSN 2082-5099, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early to Late Eocene bryozoans from the La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island were collected at two localities within the Cucullaea I Allomember (Telm4 and Telm5) on the northwestern side of the island and in two localities within the Submeseta Allomember (Telm6 and Telm7) on the northeastern side. This fauna is represented by cyclostomes of the suborders Tubuliporina and Cerioporina and suborders of Neocheilostomata, among which nine species have been recognized. The following new species are introduced: Micropora nordenskjoeldi sp. nov., Lunulites marambionis sp. nov., Otionellinaantarctica sp. nov. and Otionellina eocenica sp. nov. Some other taxa recognized in the studied material, such as Reticrescis plicatus, Uharella seymourensis and Celleporaria mesetaensis, were previously described from the lower most (Telm1) or uppermost parts (Telm6–7), thus their stratigraphical ranges within the La Meseta Formation are extended. The diverse...

  • 13.
    JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Institute of Biology, University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland;.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    An enigmatic fossil penguin from the Eocene of Antarctica2017In: Polar Research, ISSN 0800-0395, E-ISSN 1751-8369, Vol. 36, no 1, article id 1291086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tarsometatarsi are key skeletal elements in penguin palaeontology. They constitute, among others, type specimens of all 10 widely accepted species of fossil penguins from the Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour Island (Graham Land, Antarctic Peninsula). Here, we report on a recently collected large-sized tarsometatarsus from this formation that represents a new morphotype. We are convinced that the morphotype corresponds to a new species, but the material is too scarce for a taxonomic act. Undoubtedly, the bone discussed here is a valuable addition to our knowledge on diversity of early penguins.

  • 14. Jadwiszczak, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Aspects of diversity in early Antarctic penguins2011In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    First report on quill pits in early penguins2016In: Antarctic Science, ISSN 0954-1020, E-ISSN 1365-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Kriwet, Jürgen
    et al.
    Engelbrecht, Andrea
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcelo
    Pfaff, Cathrin
    Ultimate Eocene (Priabonian) chondrichthyans (Holocephali, Elasmobranchii) of Antarctica2016In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT—The Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, is known for its remarkable wealth of fossil remains of chondrichthyans and teleosts. Chondrichthyans seemingly were dominant elements in the Antarctic Paleogene fish fauna, but decreased in abundance from middle to late Eocene, during which time remains of bony fishes increase. This decline of chondrichthyans at the end of the Eocene generally is related to sudden cooling of seawater, reduction in shelf area, and increasing shelf depth due to the onset of the Antarctic thermal isolation. The last chondrichthyan records known so far include a chimeroid tooth plate from TELM 6 (Lutetian) and a single pristiophorid rostral spine from TELM 7 (Priabonian). Here, we present new chondrichthyan records of Squalus, Squatina, Pristiophorus, Striatolamia, Palaeohypotodus, Carcharocles, and Ischyodus from the upper parts of TELM 7 (Priabonian), including the first record of Carcharocles sokolovi from Antarctica. This assemblage suggests that chondrichthyans persisted much longer in Antarctic waters despite rather cool sea surface temperatures of approximately 5C. The final disappearance of chondrichthyans at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary concurs with abrupt ice sheet formation in Antarctica. Diversity patterns of chondrichthyans throughout the La Meseta Formation appear to be related to climatic conditions rather than plate tectonics.

  • 17.
    MARRAMÀ, GIUSEPPE
    et al.
    Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria..
    ENGELBRECHT, ANDREA
    Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, MARCELO A.
    Division Paleontologia de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 81900 FWA La Plata, Argentina.
    KRIWET, JÜRGEN
    Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria..
    THE SOUTHERNMOST OCCURRENCE OF BRACHYCARCHARIAS (LAMNIFORMES, ODONTASPIDIDAE) FROM THE EOCENE OF ANTARCTICA PROVIDES NEW INFORMATION ABOUT THE PALEOBIOGEOGRAPHY AND PALEOBIOLOGY OF PALEOGENE SAND TIGER SHARKS2018In: Rivista italiana di paleontologia e stratigrafia, ISSN 0035-6883, E-ISSN 2039-4942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The first record of one of the most common and widespread Paleogene selachians, the sand tiger shark Brachycarcharias, in the Ypresian strata of the La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctica, is provided herein. Selachians from the early Eocene horizons of this deposit represent the southernmost Paleogene occurrences in the fossil record, and are represented by isolated teeth belonging to orectolobiforms, lamniforms, carcharhiniforms, squatiniforms and pristiophoriforms. The combination of dental characters of the 49 isolated teeth collected from the horizons TELMs 2, 4 and 5 supports their assignment to the odontaspidid Brachycarcharias lerichei (Casier, 1946), a lamniform species widely spread across the Northern Hemisphere during the early Paleogene. The unambiguous first report of this lamniform shark in the Southern Hemisphere in the Eocene of the La Meseta Formation improves our knowledge concerning the diversity and paleobiology of the cartilaginous fishes of this deposit, and provides new insights about the biotic turnovers that involved the high trophic levels of the marine settings after the end-Cretaceous extinction and before the establishment of the modern marine ecosystems.

  • 18.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bomfleur, Benjamin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcelo
    División Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA La Plata, Argentina.
    Fossil clitellate annelid cocoons and their microbiological inclusions from the Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica2016In: Palaeontologia Electronica, ISSN 1935-3952, E-ISSN 1094-8074, Vol. 19, no 1.11A, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clitellate annelids have a meagre body fossil record but they secrete proteinaceous

    cocoons for the protection of eggs that, after hardening, are readily fossilized

    and offer a largely untapped resource for assessing the evolutionary history of this

    group. We describe three species of clitellate cocoons (viz., Burejospermum seymourense

    sp. nov., B. punctatum sp. nov. and Pegmatothylakos manumii gen. et sp. nov.)

    from the lower Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctica. The

    cocoons probably derive from continental settings and were transported to, and preserved

    within, nearshore marine to estuarine environments. The cocoons provide the

    first evidence of commensal or parasitic relationships in the Eocene continental ecosystems

    of Antarctica. Moreover, numerous micro-organisms and the oldest fossilized

    examples of animal spermatozoa are preserved as moulds within the consolidated

    walls of the cocoons. Fossil annelid cocoons offer potential for enhanced palaeoenvironmental

    interpretation of sediments, correlation between continental and shallowmarine

    strata, and improved understanding of the development of clitellate annelid

    reproductive traits and the evolutionary history of soft-bodied micro-organisms in general.

  • 19.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wirbeltiere aus dem Miozän von Homberg/Ohm (Vogelsberg,Hessen)2010In: Geologisches Jahrbuch HessenArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    FLINK, Therese
    Large apeomyine rodents (Mammalia, Eomyidae) from the early Miocene of Echzell, Germany2018In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dental material described in this paper was collected from fossiliferous ash layers of the Vogelsberg volcanic complex at Echzell, Germany. It consists of 32 teeth of a new large Apeomys species, Apeomys oldrichi n. sp., and 19 teeth of Megapeomys lindsayi Fejfar, Rummel and Tomida. Both species are extremely rare faunal elements in the early Miocene of Europe. Apeomys oldrichi n. sp. is the largest known Apeomys species, and occurs in a number of MN 3 – 4 sites in southern Germany and Czech Republic. Megapeomys lindsayi, the largest Eurasian apeomyine, was described on the basis of a single lower premolar. Herein both lower and upper cheek teeth as well as the lower deciduous premolar are described for the first time. In comparison with related populations from other localities, the evolutionary stage of the two apeomyine species clearly indicates a middle Orleanian age (MN 4) for Echzell which concurs with previous studies.

  • 21.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    HUGUENEY, Marguerite
    A Hystrix Linnaeus, 1758 incisor(Mammalia, Rodentia) from the Early Pleistocene of Senèze, France2017In: Geodiversitas, ISSN 1280-9659, E-ISSN 1638-9395Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hulbert, Richard
    Anchitheriomys Roger, 1898 or Amblycastor Matthew, 1918 (Rodentia, Castoridae)?: Taxonomic implications of a mandible from the Miocene of Florida2010In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    A new species of Amphilagus (Mammalia: Lagomorpha) from the Late Oligocene lake deposits of Enspel (Westerwald, Germany)2010In: Palaeobiodiversity and PalaeoenvironmentsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Stefen, Clara
    The castorid Steneofiber from NW Germany and its implications for the taxonomy of Miocene beavers2010In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    National Museum of Nature and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0005, Japan.
    Euroxenomys nanus sp. nov., a minute beaver (Rodentia,Castoridae) from the early Miocene of Japan2018In: Paleontological ResearchArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently discovered, incomplete dentary with preserved incisor, premolar and first molar of a minute castorid from the Dota locality, Kani Basin, early Miocene (ca. 18.5 Ma) Nakamura Formation of the Mizunami Group in central Japan, is described as a new species of the trogontheriine beaver Euroxenomys. It represents the first record of Euroxenomys in Asia and one of the oldest records of this genus. Euroxenomys nanus sp. nov. is smaller than the type species, E. minutus from the Miocene of Europe and more hypsodont, but similar in size to E. inconnexus from the Barstovian of Montana. Dota is the first Asian locality with three cooccurring castorids, Youngofiber sinensis, Minocastor godai, and E. nanus.

  • 26.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new large beaver (Mammalia, Castoridae) from the Early Miocene of Japan2016In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new early Miocene large castorid, Minocastor godai gen. et sp. nov., from the Dota locality, Gifu Prefecture in central Japan, is described on the basis of dentaries and teeth. The material comes from the Kani basin, where limnofluviatile clay and sandstones of the Nakamura Formation (Mizunami Group) are exposed on the southern (left) bank of the Kiso River. It represents the richest sample of a Miocene small mammal in the Japanese fossil record thus far known. Based on jaw and tooth morphology, this new castorid most likely represents a primitive anchitheriomyine. However, it lacks the marked striations on the incisors that are characteristic of the advanced large, middle Miocene anchitheriomyines like Anchitheriomys and Amblycastor. The new castorid shares this dental feature with other primitive anchitheriomyines from Asia and North America, like Propalaeocastor, Oligotheriomys, and Miotheriomys. For these genera, a new tribe, Minocastorini, is proposed as sister group to the Anchitheriomyini. The incisor enamel microstructure of the new castorid largely exhibits plesiomorphic characters but also apomorphic features such as pseudo-pauciserial Hunter-Schreger bands. Additionally, the outer portion of the enamel band is rather thick in comparison to that of other beavers. Based on the rodent taxa associated with Minocastor godai gen. et sp. nov., Dota can be correlated with European Neogene mammal units MN 3/4. Magnetostratigraphic studies and radiometric dates obtained from the Mizunami Group indicate that Dota is more likely correlated with MN 3, with an absolute age of around 18.5 Ma.

  • 27.
    O'Gorman, José P.
    et al.
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n., B1900FWA, La Plata, Argentina..
    Coria, Rodolfo A
    cMuseo Carmen Funes, Av. Córdoba 55 (8318), Plaza Huincul, Neuquén, Argentina. .
    Reguero, Marcelo
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n., B1900FWA, La Plata, Argentina..
    Santillana, Sergio
    dInstituto Antártico Argentino, 25 de Mayo 1143, B1650HMK San Martín, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Cardenas, Magaly
    fInstituto de Investigaciones en Paleobiología y Geología, Universidad Nacional de Río Negro, Av. Roca 1242 (8332), Gral. Roca, Río Negro Province, Argentina.
    The first non-aristonectine elasmosaurid (Sauropterygia; Plesiosauria) cranial material from Antarctica: new data on the evolution of the elasmosaurid basicranium and palate2018In: Cretaceous research (Print), ISSN 0195-6671, E-ISSN 1095-998XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elasmosaurids are a monophyletic group of cosmopolitan plesiosaurs with extremely long necks. Although abundant elasmosaurid material has been collected from the Upper Cretaceous of Antarctica, skull material is extremely rare. Here, new elasmosaurid cranial material from the lower Maastrichtian levels of the Cape Lamb Member (Snow Hill Island Formation) on Vega Island, Antarctica is described. The studied specimen (MLP 15-I-7-6) is a non-aristonectine elasmosaurid but shows a palate morphology characterized by the absence of a posterior interpterygoid symphysis and a posterior plate-like extension of the pterygoids, features previously associated with the  aristonectine palatal structure. The specimen MLP 15-I-7-6 thus provides an indication that these palatal features are also present in non-aristonectine Weddellian elasmosaurids, and makes available additional evidence of the close phylogenetical relationship between the aristonectines and some Weddellian non-aristonectine elasmosaurids.

  • 28. Pineker, Patrick
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Neocometes (Rodentia:Platacanthomyinae) from the early Miocene of Echzell, Germany2011In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Scheyer, Torsten
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Einarsson, Elisabeth
    First record of soft-shelled turtles (Cryptodira: Trionychidae) from the Late Cretaceous of Europe2012In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Schwarzhans, Werner
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Before the freeze: Otoliths from the Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica, reveal dominance of gadiform fishes (Teleostei)2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    van de Kamp, Thomas
    et al.
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Schwermann, Achim H.
    LWL-Museum of Natural History, Sentruper Str. 285, 48141 Münster, Germany.
    dos Santos Rolo, Tomy
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Lösel, Philipp D.
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Engler, Thomas
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Etter, Walter
    Department of Geosciences, Natural History Museum Basel, Augustinergasse 2, 4051 Basel, Switzerland..
    Faragó, Tomáš
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Göttlicher, Jörg
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Heuveline, Vincent
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kopmann, Andreas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Mähler, Bastian
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Odar, Janes
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Rust, Jes
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Tan Jerome, Nicholas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Vogelgesang, Matthias
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Baumbach, Tilo
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Krogmann, Lars
    Department of Entomology, State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Rosenstein 1, 70191 Stuttgart, Germany.
    Parasitoid biology preserved in mineralized fossils2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About 50% of all animal species are considered parasites. The linkage of species diversity to a parasitic lifestyle is especially evident in the insect order Hymenoptera. However, fossil evidence for host–parasitoid interactions is extremely rare, rendering hypotheses on the evolution of parasitism assumptive. Here, using high-throughput synchrotron X-ray microtomography, we examine 1510 phosphatized fly pupae from the Paleogene of France and identify 55 parasitation events by four wasp species, providing morphological and ecological data. All species developed as solitary endoparasitoids inside their hosts and exhibit different morphological adaptations for exploiting the same hosts in one habitat. Our results allow systematic and ecological placement of four distinct endoparasitoids in the Paleogene and highlight the need to investigate ecological data preserved in the fossil record.

  • 32. ČERŇANSKÝ, Andrej
    et al.
    SZYNDLAR, Zbigniew
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fossil squamate faunas from the Neogene of Hambach (northwestern Germany). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 32 of 32
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