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  • 1.
    Charette, M
    et al.
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA.
    Lam, P.J.
    University of California Santa Cruz, USA.
    Lohan, M.C.
    University of Southhampton, UK.
    Kwon, E.Y.
    Seoul National University,Korea.
    Hatje, V
    Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil.
    Jeandel, C
    University of Toulouse, France.
    Shiller, A.M.
    University of Southern Mississippi, USA.
    Cutter, G.A.
    Old Dominion University, USA.
    Thomas, A
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Boyd, P.W.
    University of Tasmania, Australia.
    Homoky, W.B.
    University of Oxford, UK.
    Milne, A.
    Plymoth University, UK.
    Thomas, H.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Andersson, P.S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Porcelli, D.
    University of Oxford,Uk.
    Tanaka, T
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Geibert, W
    Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany.
    Dehairs, F.
    Vrije Universiteit, Belgium.
    Garcia-Orellana, J.
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Coastal ocean and shelf-sea biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and isotopes: lessons learned from GEOTRACES2016In: Philosopical Transactions of the Royal Society A, ISSN 1364–503X, Vol. 374, no 2081Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continental shelves and shelf seas play a central role in the global carbon cycle. However,

    their importance with respect to trace element and isotope (TEI) inputs to ocean basins

    is less well understood. Here, we present major findings on shelf TEI biogeochemistry

    from the GEOTRACES programme as well as a proof of concept for a new method to

    estimate shelf TEI fluxes. The case studies focus on advances in our understanding of TEI

    cycling in the Arctic, transformations within a major river estuary (Amazon), shelf sediment

    micronutrient fluxes and basin-scale estimates of submarine groundwater discharge. The

    proposed shelf flux tracer is 228-radium (T1/2 =5.75 yr), which is continuously supplied to

    the shelf from coastal aquifers, sediment porewater exchange and rivers. Model-derived shelf

    228Ra fluxes are combined with TEI/ 228Ra ratios to quantify ocean TEI fluxes from the

    western North Atlantic margin. The results from this new approach agree well with previous

    estimates for shelf Co, Fe, Mn and Zn inputs and exceed published estimates of atmospheric

    deposition by factors of approximately 3–23. Lastly, recommendations are made for additional

    GEOTRACES process studies and coastal margin-focused section cruises that will help refine

    the model and provide better insight on the mechanisms driving shelf-derived TEI fluxes

    to the ocean.

    This article is part of the themed issue ‘Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element

    chemistry’.

  • 2.
    Chi Fru, Ernest
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Rodríguez, Nathalie
    Stockholm University Department of Geological Sciences.
    Partin, Camille
    University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Lalonde, Stefan
    Université de Bretagne Occidentale, France.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Weiss, Dominik
    Imperial College, London, UK.
    El Albani, Abderrazak
    Université de Poitiers, France.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    ALS Scandinavia, Sweden.
    Konhauser, Kurt
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Cu isotopes in marine black shales record the Great Oxidation Event2016In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 18, p. 4941-4946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oxygenation of the atmosphere ∼2.45–2.32 billion years ago (Ga) is one of the most significant geological events to have affected Earth’s redox history. Our understanding of the timing and processes surrounding this key transition is largely dependent on the development of redox-sensitive proxies, many of which remain unexplored. Here we report a shift from negative to positive copper isotopic compositions (δ65CuERM-AE633) in organic carbon-rich shales spanning the period 2.66–2.08 Ga. We suggest that, before 2.3 Ga, a muted oxidative supply of weathering-derived copper enriched in 65Cu, along with the preferential removal of 65Cu by iron oxides, left seawater and marine biomass depleted in 65Cu but enriched in 63Cu. As banded iron formation deposition waned and continentally sourced Cu became more important, biomass sampled a dissolved Cu reservoir that was progressively less fractionated relative to the continental pool. This evolution toward heavy δ65Cu values coincides with a shift to negative sedimentary δ56Fe values and increased marine sulfate after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), and is traceable through Phanerozoic shales to modern marine settings, where marine dissolved and sedimentary δ65Cu values are universally positive. Our finding of an important shift in sedimentary Cu isotope compositions across the GOE provides new insights into the Precambrian marine cycling of this critical micronutrient, and demonstrates the proxy potential for sedimentary Cu isotope compositions in the study of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic redox balance in the past.

  • 3.
    Cuss, Chad
    et al.
    Trent University Canada.
    Guéguen, Celine
    Trent University Canada.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Porcelli, Don
    University of Oxford UK.
    Maximov, Trofim
    North-Eastern Federal University Yakutsk, Russia.
    Kutscher, Liselott
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Advanced residuals analysis for determining the number of PARAFAC components in dissolved organic matter2016In: Applied Spectroscopy, ISSN 0003-7028, E-ISSN 1943-3530, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 334-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fehr, Manuela A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andersson, Per S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Hålenius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet.
    Iron enrichments and Fe isotopic compositions of surface sediments from the Gotland Deep, Baltic Sea2010In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 277, p. 310-322Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fehr, Manuela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andersson, Per S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Hålenius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms universitet.
    Iron isotope variations in Holocene sediments of the Gotland deep, Baltic Sea2008In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 72, p. 807-826Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analyses of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, Sweden2015In: Forging Identities. The Mobility of Culture in Bronze Age Europe: Report from a Marie Curie Project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard, 2012, Volume 1 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archeological Reports , 2015, p. 183-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material as a means to reconstruct prehistoric residential patterns has previously mainly been applied to populations with terrestrial diets. Here we present a model for populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets, which is based on two-component mixing of strontium isotopes. Applying this model, we can estimate the original strontium isotope value of the terrestrial component of the diet. Accordingly it is possible to identify non-local individuals even if they had a mixed marine/terrestrial diet. The model is applied to tooth enamel samples representing nine individuals recovered from a passage grave in Resmo, on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, where at least five non-local individuals, representing at least two different geographical regions of origin, were identified. Non-local individuals were more frequent during the Bronze Age than during previous phases.

  • 7.
    Grasse, P.
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany.
    Brezezinski, M.
    Marine Science Institute and the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology & University of California, USA.
    Cardinal, D.
    Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France.
    de Souza, G.F.
    ETH Zurich, Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Switzerland.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Closset, I.
    Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France.
    Cao, Z.
    State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.
    Dai, M.
    State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.
    Ehlert, C.
    Max Planck Research Group for Marine Isotope Geochemistry, University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Estrade, N.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,.
    Francois, R.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia,.
    Frank, M.
    GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Germany.
    Jiang, G.
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jones, J.L.
    Marine Science Institute and the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara USA.
    Kooijman, E.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Liu, Q.
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Lu, D.
    Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Pahnke, K.
    Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment, University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Ponzevera, E.
    Unité de Recherche Géosciences Marines, IFREMER, Brest, France.
    Schmitt, M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Sun, S.
    Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sutton, J.N.
    Universite de Brest, CNRS, IRD, IFREMER, LEMAR, IUEM, France.
    Thil, F.
    LSCE/IPSL - Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif sur Yvette, France.
    Weis, D.
    University of British Columbia Pacific Center for Isotopic and Geochemical Research, Vancouver, British Columbia,Canada .
    Wetzel, F.
    ETH Zurich, Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, Switzerland.
    Zhang, A.
    State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhang, J.
    State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science,Xiamen University,.
    GEOTRACES Intercalibration of the Stable Silicon Isotope Composition of Dissolved Silicic Acid in Seawater2017In: Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, ISSN ISSN 0267-9477, Vol. 32, p. 562-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first inter-calibration study of the stable silicon isotope composition of dissolved silicic acid in seawater, d30Si(OH)4, is presented as a contribution to the international GEOTRACES program. Eleven laboratories from seven countries analyzed two seawater samples from the North Pacific subtropical gyre (Station ALOHA) collected at 300 m and at 1000 m water depth. Sampling depths were chosen to obtain samples with a relatively low (9 mmol L-1, 300 m) and a relatively high (113 mmol L-1, 1000 m) silicic acid concentration as sample preparation differs for low- and high concentration samples. Data for the 1000 m water sample were not normally distributed so the median is used to represent the central tendency for the two samples. Median d30Si(OH)4 values of +1.66‰ for the low-concentration sample and +1.25‰ for the high-concentration sample were obtained. Agreement among laboratories is overall considered very good; however, small but statistically significant differences among the mean isotope values obtained by different laboratories were detected, likely reflecting inter-laboratory differences in chemical preparation including preconcentration and purification methods together with different volumes of seawater analyzed, andthe use of different mass spectrometers including the Neptune MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Fisher™, Germany), the Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS (Nu Instruments™, Wrexham, UK), and the Finnigan™ (now Thermo Fisher™, Germany) MAT 252 IRMS. Future studies analyzing d30Si(OH)4 in seawater should also analyze and report values for these same two reference waters in order to facilitate comparison of data generated among and within laboratories over time.

  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry Stockholm University.
    Gelting, Johan
    Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Larsson, Ulf
    Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Roos, Per
    Department of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark.
    An assessment of upper ocean carbon and nitrogen export fluxes on the boreal continental shelf: A 3-year study in the open Baltic Sea comparing sediment traps, 234Th proxy, nutrient, and oxygen budgets2013In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, ISSN 1541-5856, E-ISSN 1541-5856, ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 495-510, article id DOI: 10.4319/lom.2013.11.495Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Horst, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Stockholm University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Thornton, Brett F
    Stockholm University.
    Wishkerman, Asher
    Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, Germany.
    Keppler, Frank
    Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, Germany.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University.
    Stable bromine isotopic composition of methyl bromide released from plant matter2014In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 125, p. 186-195Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Ning, Wenxin
    et al.
    Department of Geology Lund University.
    Andersson, Per S
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ghosh, Anupam
    Dept. of Geol. Sciences Jadavpur University India.
    Khan, Mansoor
    Department of Geology Lund University.
    Filipsson, Helena
    Department of Geology Lund University.
    Quantitative salinity reconstructions of the Baltic Sea during the mid-Holocene2017In: Boreas, ISSN 0300-9483, E-ISSN 1502-3885, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 100-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Rosén, Per-Olov
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Alling, Vanja
    Norwegian Environment Agency.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Department of Geological Sciences Stockholm University.
    Björk, Göran
    Department of Oceanography Göteborg University.
    Semiletov, Igor
    International Arctic Research Center University of Alaska.
    Porcelli, Don
    Department of Earth Sciences Oxford University.
    Ice export from the Laptev and East Siberian Sea derived from δ18O values2015In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, ISSN 2169-9275, Vol. 120, no 9, p. 5997-6007, article id 10.1002/2015JC010866Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Sun, Xiaole
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Olofsson, Martin
    Linnaeus University Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Fry, Brian
    Griffith University Australia.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Linneaus University Kalmar, Sweden.
    Humborg, Christoph
    Stockholm University.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    Effects of growth and dissolution on the fractionationof silicon isotopes by estuarine diatoms2014In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 130, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Thornton, Brett
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Horst, Axel
    Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Carrizo, Daniel
    Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Crill, Patrick
    Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    A High-Volume Cryosampler and Sample Purification System for Bromine Isotope Studies of Methyl Bromide2013In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, ISSN 0739-0572, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 2095-2107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Trezzi, Giada
    et al.
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Garcia-Orellana, Jordi
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Rodellas, Valentí
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Masque, Pere
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Garcia-Solsona, Ester
    Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Assessing the role of submarine groundwater discharge as a source of Sr to the Mediterranean Sea2017In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 200, p. 42-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been identified as an

    important source of Sr to the ocean and the SGD-driven Sr flux to the

    global ocean has been recently re-evaluated (Beck et al. 2013). However,

    the uncertainty of this value is still high because of the uncertainties

    related to the determination of SGD flow rates and the paucity of

    87Sr/86Sr data in SGD end-members. As carbonates have high Sr

    concentrations and are subjected to intense heightened weathering, they

    might significantly influence the SGD input of Sr to the ocean. Here we

    present data on Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in three carbonate

    dominated sites of the western area of the Mediterranean Sea, a semienclosed

    basin characterized by abundant coastal carbonates. The

    87Sr/86Sr ratios in groundwater were lower compared to modern seawater (~

    0.70916), as expected for areas dominated by carbonate lithologies.

    Concentrations of Sr and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in groundwater showed

    conservative mixing in the studied subterranean estuaries. By using SGD

    flow rates reported in the literature for the study areas, a meteoric

    SGD-driven Sr flux of (0.12 - 2.1)·103 mol d-1 km-1 was calculated for

    the region, with a fresh SGD end-member characterized by a Sr

    concentration of 27 - 30 μM and a 87Sr/86Sr ratio of 0.708020 - 0.707834.

    Integrating these Sr data with literature data (i.e. values of Sr

    concentration and 87Sr/86Sr ratio from other lithologies as well as SGD

    flow rates), we also calculated the fresh SGD-driven Sr flux to the

    entire Mediterranean Sea, obtaining a value of (0.34 - 0.83)·109 mol y-1,

    with a 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7086 - 0.7081. Thus, for the entire Mediterranean

    basin, SGD is globally a source of Sr less radiogenic compared to

    seawater. The SGD Sr flux to the Mediterranean Sea represents 5-6% of the

    SGD Sr flux to the global ocean and the Mediterranean SGD end-member has

    higher Sr concentration (5.0 - 12 μM) than the global SGD end-member (2.9

    μM). This confirms the significant role of carbonate lithologies on SGDdriven

    Sr fluxes to seawater.

    The fresh SGD-driven Sr flux to the Mediterranean Sea is about 20 - 50%

    of the riverine Sr input and significantly higher than the input through

    atmospheric dust deposition. Therefore SGD should be considered as an

    important continental source of Sr to the basin.

  • 15.
    Winton, V.H.L.
    et al.
    Curtin University, Perth.
    Dunbar, G.B.
    Antarctic Research Centre, Wellington.
    Atkins, C.B.
    Victoria University, Wellington.
    Bertler, N.A.N.
    Antarctic Research Centre, Wellington.
    Delmonte, Barbara
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Bowie, A
    University of Tasmania, Hobart.
    Edwards, R.
    Curtin University, Perth.
    The origin of lithogenic sediment in the south-western Ross Sea and implications for iron fertilization2016In: Antarctic Science, ISSN 0954-1020, E-ISSN 1365-2079, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 250-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summer iron (Fe) fertilization in the Ross Sea has previously been observed in association with diatom productivity, lithogenic particles and excess Fe in the water column. This productivity event occurred during an early breakout of sea ice via katabatic winds, suggesting that aeolian dust could be an important source of lithogenic Fe required for diatom growth in the Ross Sea. Here we investigate the provenance of size-selected dust deposited on sea ice in McMurdo Sound, south-western (SW) Ross Sea. The isotopic signature of McMurdo Sound dust (0.70533< 87Sr/86Sr< 0.70915 and -1.1 < εNd(0) <3.45)confirms that dust is locally sourced from the McMurdo Sound debris bands and comprises a two-component mixture of McMurdo Volcanic Group and southern Victoria Land lithologies. In addition, the provenance of lithogenic sediment trapped in the water column was investigated, and the isotopic signature (εNd(0) =3.9, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70434) is differentiated from long-range transported dust originating from South America and Australia. Elevated lithogenic accumulation rates in deeper sediment traps in the Ross Sea suggest that sinking articles in the water column cannot simply result from dust input at the surface. This discrepancy can be best explained by significant upwelling and remobilization of lithogenic Fe from the sea floor.

  • 16.
    Winton, V.H.L.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology. Curtin University Perth Australia.
    Dunbar, G.B.
    University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Bertler, N.A.N.
    University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Millet, M.-A
    University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Delmonte, B
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano Italy.
    Atkins, C.B.
    Durham University, Durham UK.
    Chewings, J.M.
    University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    The contribution of aeolian sand and dust to iron fertilization of phytoplankton blooms in southwestern Ross Sea, Antarctica2014In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Winton, V.H.L.
    et al.
    Curtin University.
    Edwards, R
    Curtin University.
    Delmonte, B
    University of Milano-Bicocca.
    Ellis, A
    Curtin University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Bowie, A
    University of Tasmania.
    Bertler, N.A.N.
    University of Wellington.
    Neff, P.
    University of Rochester.
    Tuohy, A
    University of Wellington.
    Multiple sources of soluble atmospheric iron to Antarctic waters2016In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 421-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ross Sea, Antarctica, is a highly productive region of the Southern Ocean. Significant new sources of iron (Fe) are required to sustain phytoplankton blooms in the austral summer. Atmospheric deposition is one potential source. The fractional solubility of Fe is an important variable determining Fe availability for biological uptake. To constrain aerosol Fe inputs to the Ross Sea region, fractional solubility of Fe was analyzed in a snow pit from Roosevelt Island, eastern Ross Sea. In addition, aluminum, dust, and refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations were analyzed, to determine the contribution of mineral dust and combustion sources to the supply of aerosol Fe. We estimate exceptionally high dissolved Fe (dFe) flux of 1.2 × 10−6 g m−2 y−1 and total dissolvable Fe flux of 140 × 10−6 g m−2 y−1 for 2011/2012. Deposition of dust, Fe, Al, and rBC occurs primarily during spring-summer. The observed background fractional Fe solubility of ~0.7% is consistent with a mineral dust source. Radiogenic isotopic ratios and particle size distribution of dust indicates that the site is influenced by local and remote sources. In 2011/2012 summer, relatively high dFe concentrations paralleled both mineral dust and rBC deposition. Around half of the annual aerosol Fe deposition occurred in the austral summer phytoplankton growth season; however, the fractional Fe solubility was low. Our results suggest that the seasonality of dFe deposition can vary and should be considered on longer glacial-interglacial timescales.

  • 18.
    Winton, V.H.L.
    et al.
    Curtin University Perth Australia.
    Edwards, R.
    Curtin University Perth Australia.
    Delmonte, B.
    University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
    Ellis, A
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Bowie, A
    University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
    Bertler, N.A.N.
    University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Neff, P.
    University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.
    Tuohy, A.
    University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
    Multiple sources of soluble atmospheric iron to Antarctic waters2016In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Wortberg, Katharina
    et al.
    Luleå Technical University.
    Conrad, Sarah
    Luleå Technical University.
    Andersson, Per
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ingri, Johan
    Luleå Technical University.
    Strontium Isotopes - A Tracer for River Suspended Iron Aggregates2017In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 95, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kalix River shows distinct temporal variations in the Sr-isotope ratio in filtered water (0.726 to 0.732). During base flow in winter the 87Sr/86Sr ratio is on average 0.730. When discharge increases and peaks during spring flood the 87Sr/86Sr ratio shows the most radiogenic (0.732) values. The temporal variations in the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Kalix River can be explained by mixing of water from the woodlands and the mountain areas.

    During high water discharge in May the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are more radiogenic in the suspended phase (1 kDa - 70 µm) compared to the truly dissolved phase (<1 kDa). The difference in 87Sr/86Sr ratio between the two phases (Δ 87Sr/86Sr) is linearly correlated with the suspended iron concentration. During spring flood Sr and Fe derived from an additional source, reach the river. Deep groundwater has a more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio than the Kalix River during spring flood and thus, represents a possible source for the suspended Fe and the associated Sr. Strontium can be coprecipitated with and adsorbed to different types of Fe aggregates. We propose that the Sr-isotope ratio in the suspended phase reflects the isotopic composition of the water at the interface between anoxic groundwater and oxic stream water in the riparian zone, where the Fe aggregates are formed. These particles dominate the suspended phase in the river and the mixing with mountain waters, poor in Fe, produces the difference in the isotopic signature. The different signatures in suspended and truly dissolved fraction indicate that these aggregates are relatively stable during stream-river transport. As such the 87Sr/86Sr can be used to trace the origin of the non-detrital suspended phase.

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