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  • 1. Brantberg, Krister
    et al.
    Babak, F.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Do extant elephants have superior canal dehiscence syndrome?2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Green, Jeremy
    et al.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Xenarthran tooth architecture and dietary adaptations from analyses of dental microstructure and microwear, with new data for the giant sloth Megatherium americanum (Megatheriidae)2015In: Journal of Mammalogy, ISSN 0022-2372, E-ISSN 1545-1542, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 645-657Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Extinctions, genetic erosion and conservation options for the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis)2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, article id 41417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The black rhinoceros is again on the verge of extinction due to unsustainable poaching in its nativerange. Despite a wide historic distribution, the black rhinoceros was traditionally thought of asdepauperate in genetic variation, and with very little known about its evolutionary history. Thisknowledge gap has hampered conservation efforts because hunting has dramatically reduced thespecies' once continuous distribution, leaving five surviving gene pools of unknown genetic affinity.Here we examined the range-wide genetic structure of historic and modern populations using thelargest and most geographically representative sample of black rhinoceroses ever assembled. Usingboth mitochondrial and nuclear datasets, we described a staggering loss of 69% of the species'mitochondrial genetic variation, including the most ancestral lineages that are now absent frommodern populations. Genetically unique populations in countries such as Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad,Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi and Angola no longer exist. We found that the historicrange of the West African subspecies (D. b. longipes), declared extinct in 2011, extends into southernKenya, where a handful of individuals survive in the Masai Mara. We also identify conservation unitsthat will help maintain evolutionary potential. Our results suggest a complete re-evaluation of currentconservation management paradigms for the black rhinoceros.

  • 4.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Feeding Ecology in Oligocene Mylodontoid Sloths (Mammalia,Xenarthra) as Revealed by Orthodentine Microwear Analysis2018In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 551-564-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, dental microwear analysis has been successfully employed to xenarthran teeth. Here, we present new data on use wear features on 16 molariforms of Orophodon hapaloides and Octodontotherium grande. These taxa count among the earliest sloths and are known from the Deseadan SALMA (late Oligocene). Modern phylogenetic analyses classify Octodontotherium and Orophodon within Mylodontoidea with whom they share lobate cheek teeth with an outer layer of cementum and a thick layer of orthodentine. Similar target areas of 100 μm2 were analyzed on the orthodentine surface of each tooth by stereomicroscopic microwear and by SEM microwear. Results were unlike those of extant sloths (stereomicroscopic microwear: Bradypus, Choloepus) and published data from fossil sloths (SEM microwear: Acratocnus, Megalonyx, Megatherium, Thinobadistes); thus, both approaches independently indicate a different feeding ecology for the Oligocene taxa. The unique microwear results suggest that both taxa fed on plant material with low to moderate intrinsic toughness (foliage, twigs) but also proposes intake of tougher food items (e.g., seeds). Frequent gouging of the tooth surfaces can be explained by exogenous influence on microwear, such as possible intake of abrasive grit. We suggest an unspecialized herbivorous diet for Octodontotherium and Orophodon utilizing diverse food resources of their habitat. These interpretations support the reconstruction of (1) Deseadan environments as open habitats with spreading savannas/grasslands and (2) both taxa as wide muzzled bulk feeders at ground level.

  • 5.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature for Mammalian post-canine dentitions2017In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental wear facets on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars are traces of their main function, themastication and therefore reflect masticatory movements and also paramasticatory (i.e. non-dietary useof teeth) behavior. Here we present the Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature applicable to most mammaliandentitions. Topographic positions of wear facets in relation to the major cusps and crests of the teeth areused to designate the areas of the occlusal surface the facets occupy (e.g. their mesial, distal, lingual, orbuccal position). Previous published systems for labeling wear facets have been inconsistent with eachother. Therefore, we provide a synoptic review of the most widely-used terminologies, and introducethe alternative Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature. This nomenclature aims to overcome the difficultiescaused by the existing inconsistent wear facet terminologies. Our new approach is applicable to dentitionswhere the occlusal morphology does not change significantly for most of the lifetime of the animal. Inthose dentitions, the primary occlusal surfaces are not significantly modified as wear facets become moreextensive with wearing. This appears to be a common pattern in pre-tribosphenic, tribosphenic molars,and the teeth derived from tribosphenic precursors (e.g. bunodont molar morphologies). In teeth wherethe secondary occlusal surface is functionally intensely modified (i.e. high-crowned and evergrowingteeth with large areas of dentine exposed) any facet labeling system appears to be challenging, since theidentification of individual facets is blurred and their spatial position may be indeterminable.

  • 6.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kimura, Yuri
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac
    Institut Català de Paleontologia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindsay, Everett H.
    Koenigswald, Wighart von
    Paciculus walshi, new species, (Rodentia, Cricetidae), the origin of Cricetidae and an Oligocene intercontinental mammal dispersal event2016In: Historical Biology, Vol. 28, p. 78-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    O'Connor, Patrick M.
    Ohio Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies, Athens, Ohio, USA.
    Roberts, Eric M.
    James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
    A new mammal from the Turonian–Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Galula Formation, southwestern Tanzania2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 65-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here establish a newmammaliaform genus and species, Galulatheriumjenkinsi (Mammalia), from the UpperCretaceous Galula Formation in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. Thisrepresents the first named taxon of a mammaliaform from the entire Late Cretaceous,an interval of 34 million years, of continental Afro-Africa. Preliminary studyof the holotype (a partial dentary) resulted in tentative assignation to the Gondwanatheria,a poorly known, enigmatic clade of Late Cretaceous–Paleogene Gondwanan mammals (Krauseet al. 2003). The application of advanced imaging (µCT) and visualizationtechniques permits a more detailed understanding of key anatomical features of thenew taxon. CT analysis reveals that the lower dentition consisted of a large,procumbent lower incisor and four cheek teeth, all which are ever growing(hypselodont). Importantly, all of the teeth appear to have been devoid ofenamel during life. Comparisons conducted with a range of Mesozoic and selectedCenozoic mammaliaform groups demonstrates that a number of features (e.g.,enamel-less and ever-growing teeth, columnar cheek teeth with relatively simpleocclusal morphology) expressed in Galulatheriumare reminiscent of disparate groups, making taxonomic assignment difficult. Hereinwe retain the provisional referral of Galulatherium(RRBP 02067) to Gondwanatheria; it is most similar to sudamericids such as Lavanify and Bharratherium from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and India,respectively, which exhibit relatively simple, high-crowned, columnar cheek teeth.Other features (e.g., enamel-less dentition) shared with disparate forms suchas the Late Jurassic Fruitafossor andvarious xenarthrans (e.g., sloths) are attributed to convergence. Detailed analysesof the depositional context for the type and only specimen place it as havinglived sometime between the late Turonian and latest Campanian (roughly 91–72million years ago). This enhanced geochronological context helps to refine thepalaeobiogeographical significance of Galulatheriumamong Cretaceous mammals in general and those of Gondwanan landmassesspecifically.

  • 9.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Schulz-Kornas, Ellen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
    Corfe, Ian
    University of Helsinki.
    Martin, Thomas
    Universität Bonn.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schultz, Julia A.
    Universität Bonn.
    Complementary approaches to tooth wear analysisin Tritylodontidae (Synapsida, Mammaliamorpha)reveal a generalist diet.2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1-24, article id e0220188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoscopic microwear and 3D surface texture analyses on the cheek teeth of ten Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous tritylodontid (Mammaliamorpha) taxa of small/medium to large body size suggest that all were generalist feeders and none was a dietary specialist adapted to herbivory. There was no correspondence between body size and food choice. Stereomicroscopic microwear analysis revealed predominantly fine wear features with numerous small pits and less abundant fine scratches as principal components. Almost all analyzed facets bear some coarser microwear features, such as coarse scratches, large pits, puncture pits and gouges pointing to episodic feeding on harder food items or exogenous effects (contamination of food with soil grit and/or dust), or both. 3D surface texture analysis indicates predominantly fine features with large void volume, low peak densities, and various stages of roundness of the peaks. We interpret these features to indicate consumption of food items with low to moderate intrinsic abrasiveness and can exclude regular rooting, digging or caching behavior. Possible food items include plant vegetative parts, plant reproductive structures (seeds and seed-bearing organs), and invertebrates (i.e., insects). Although the tritylodontid tooth morphology and auto-occlusion suggest plants as the primary food resource, our results imply a wider dietary range including animal matter.

  • 10.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Trocheri, M.W.
    Jungers, W.L.
    The evolutionary origin and population history of the grauer gorilla2016In: Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 159, p. S4-S18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lagerholm, Vendela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, E.
    Ehrich, D.
    Abramson, N.
    Nadachowski, A.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Germonpré, M.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stewart, J.
    Dalén, L.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    On the Origin of the Norwegian Lemming2014In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 2060-2071Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Loch, Carolona
    et al.
    BUONO, Monica
    KALTHOFF, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    FERNANDEZ, Martha
    Enamel microstructure in Eocene cetaceans from Antarctica (Archaeoceti and Mysticeti)2020In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new large beaver (Mammalia, Castoridae) from the Early Miocene of Japan2016In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new early Miocene large castorid, Minocastor godai gen. et sp. nov., from the Dota locality, Gifu Prefecture in central Japan, is described on the basis of dentaries and teeth. The material comes from the Kani basin, where limnofluviatile clay and sandstones of the Nakamura Formation (Mizunami Group) are exposed on the southern (left) bank of the Kiso River. It represents the richest sample of a Miocene small mammal in the Japanese fossil record thus far known. Based on jaw and tooth morphology, this new castorid most likely represents a primitive anchitheriomyine. However, it lacks the marked striations on the incisors that are characteristic of the advanced large, middle Miocene anchitheriomyines like Anchitheriomys and Amblycastor. The new castorid shares this dental feature with other primitive anchitheriomyines from Asia and North America, like Propalaeocastor, Oligotheriomys, and Miotheriomys. For these genera, a new tribe, Minocastorini, is proposed as sister group to the Anchitheriomyini. The incisor enamel microstructure of the new castorid largely exhibits plesiomorphic characters but also apomorphic features such as pseudo-pauciserial Hunter-Schreger bands. Additionally, the outer portion of the enamel band is rather thick in comparison to that of other beavers. Based on the rodent taxa associated with Minocastor godai gen. et sp. nov., Dota can be correlated with European Neogene mammal units MN 3/4. Magnetostratigraphic studies and radiometric dates obtained from the Mizunami Group indicate that Dota is more likely correlated with MN 3, with an absolute age of around 18.5 Ma.

  • 15. Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    et al.
    Baca, Mateusz
    Abramson, Natalia I.
    Sablin, Mikhail
    Socha, Pawel
    Nadachowski, Adam
    Prost, Stefan
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Kosintsev, Pavel
    Smirnov, Nickolay G.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Ponomarev, Dmitry
    Nystroem, Johanna
    Nikolskiy, Pavel
    Jass, Christopher N.
    Litvinov, Yuriy N.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Grigoriev, Semyon
    Fadeeva, Tatyana
    Douka, Aikaterini
    Higham, Thomas F. G.
    Ersmark, Erik
    Pitulko, Vladimir
    Pavlova, Elena
    Stewart, John R.
    Weglenski, Piotr
    Stankovic, Anna
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Synchronous genetic turnovers across Western Eurasia in Late Pleistocene collared lemmings2016In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1710-1721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent palaeogenetic studies indicate a highly dynamic history in collared lemmings (Dicrostonyx spp.), with several demographical changes linked to climatic fluctuations that took place during the last glaciation. At the western range margin of D.torquatus, these changes were characterized by a series of local extinctions and recolonizations. However, it is unclear whether this pattern represents a local phenomenon, possibly driven by ecological edge effects, or a global phenomenon that took place across large geographical scales. To address this, we explored the palaeogenetic history of the collared lemming using a next-generation sequencing approach for pooled mitochondrial DNA amplicons. Sequences were obtained from over 300 fossil remains sampled across Eurasia and two sites in North America. We identified five mitochondrial lineages of D.torquatus that succeeded each other through time across Europe and western Russia, indicating a history of repeated population extinctions and recolonizations, most likely from eastern Russia, during the last 50000years. The observation of repeated extinctions across such a vast geographical range indicates large-scale changes in the steppe-tundra environment in western Eurasia during the last glaciation. AllHolocene samples, from across the species' entire range, belonged to only one of the five mitochondrial lineages. Thus, extant D.torquatus populations only harbour a small fraction of the total genetic diversity that existed across different stages of the Late Pleistocene. In North American samples, haplotypes belonging to both D.groenlandicus and D.richardsoni were recovered from a Late Pleistocene site in south-western Canada. This suggests that D.groenlandicus had a more southern and D.richardsoni a more northern glacial distribution than previously thought. This study provides significant insights into the population dynamics of a small mammal at a large geographical scale and reveals a rather complex demographical history, which could have had bottom-up effects in the Late Pleistocene steppe-tundra ecosystem.

  • 16. van der Valk, Tom
    et al.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Caillaud, Damien
    Ngobobo, Urbain
    Binyinyi, Escobar
    Nishuli, Radar
    Stoinski, Tara
    Gilissen, Emmanuel
    Sonet, Gontran
    Semal, Patrick
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dalén, Love
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Significant loss of mitochondrial diversity within the last century due to extinction of peripheral populations in eastern gorillas2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6551Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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