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  • 1.
    ACOSTA HOSPITALECHE, Carolina
    et al.
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata, Argentina.
    HAGSTRÖM, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    División Paleontología Vertebrados, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, B1900FWA, La Plata and Instituto Antártico Argentino (Dirección Nacional del Antártico), 25 de mayo 1143, San Martín, Argentina.
    Historical perspective of Otto Nordenskjöld´s Antarctic fossil penguin collection and Carl Wiman’s contribution2017In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 364-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early explorer and scientist Otto Nordenskjöld, leader of the Swedish South Polar Expedition of 1901–1903, was the first to collect Antarctic penguin fossils. The site is situated in the northeastern region of Seymour Island and constitutes one of the most important localities in the study of fossilised penguins. The task of describing these specimens together with fossilised whale remains was given to Professor Carl Wiman (1867–1944) at Uppsala University, Sweden. Although the paradigm for the systematic study of penguins has changed considerably over recent years, Wiman's contributions are still remarkable. His establishment of grouping by size as a basis for classification was a novel approach that allowed them to deal with an unexpectedly high morphological diversity and limited knowledge of penguin skeletal anatomy. In the past, it was useful to provide a basic framework for the group that today could be used as ‘taxon free’ categories. First, it was important to define new species, and then to establish a classification based on size and robustness. This laid the foundation for the first attempts to use morphometric parameters for the classification of isolated penguin bones. The Nordenskjöld materials constitute an invaluable collection for comparative purposes, and every year researchers from different countries visit this collection.

  • 2.
    Hagenfeldt, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Palmlöv, Erik
    Svenska Petroleum Exploration AB.
    Amantov, Aleksey
    cA.P. Karpinsky Russian Geological Research Institute (VSEGEI).
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ghalayini, Rémy
    Agenor Energy.
    Liljedahl, Thomas
    WSP Sverige AB.
    The development of dark shales from the middle and late Cambrian to early Ordovician on the East European Platform – with focus on Gotland2023In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By compiling data from literature and unpublished reports a more detailed description is presented on the geographical and stratigraphic distribution of the Alum Shale Formation (ASF) and correlateable units on the East European Platform. In the northern part of Gotland, downfaulted patchy beds of the ASF indicate a former wider extension of the formation. Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian) examples of downfaulted patchy beds are the contemporaneous Sepopol and Nivenskaya formations in northeastern Poland and the Kaliningrad area, as well as the Salantai Formation in the east Baltic area. It is indicated that Furongian-Tremadocian beds, contemporaneous with the Kallavere, Türisalu, Tosna and Koporye formations, in the area of northern Estonia and the northwestern part of the Moscow Basin, extended to the Gotland and the South Bothnian Basin areas. South of Gotland, in the Swedish sector of the Baltic Basin, drill cores show evidence of tectonic movements through the presence of erosional surfaces indicating occasional subaerial exposure. In this region, variations in the areal extent and thickness of the ASF and coeval formations are suggested to be the result of epeirogenic and tectonic block movements. Tremadocian ASF is also indicated to be present south of Gotland. On Gotland, at least 5 m of the ASF is presumed to have been eroded. The Moscow Basin contains 19 m of dark shales (Koporye Formation) which is significantly thicker than in surrounding areas.

  • 3.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Where Swedish polar research began: the Linnaean apostle Anton Rolandson Martin’s voyage to Spitsbergen in 17582018In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 54, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1758 the renowned Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus sent his student Anton Rolandson Martin to the Arctic on-board a whaler to collect scientific specimens. He became the first Swedish scientist to sail these northern waters and to set foot on Spitsbergen. But what route did the ship take and where exactly did he land? By using a combination of geographical information in Martin’s diary together with latitude and wind directions from his meteorological records the ship’s voyage has been reconstructed. The whaler set course directly to the west coast of Spitsbergen and then patrolled waters from there to the eastern flank of the ice fields off Greenland. The ship then returned to Spitsbergen as the whaling season drew to an end. Martin got the chance to set foot on land only once and for just two hours. After recent field work at the presumed locality 258 years after Martin’s visit, his descriptions of the islets were checked and a first-hand comparison was made between the rock sample Martin brought home and the local bedrock. The author is now confident that the landing took place on Forlandsøyane islands, situated off the southwestern coast of Prins Karls Forland.

  • 4.
    Hara, Urszula
    et al.
    Polish Geologi cal Institute – Nati onal Research Institute.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcelo A.
    Museo de La Plata, Di vi sion Paleontol ogia de Vertebrados.
    Eocene bryozoan assemblages from the La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctica2018In: Geological Quarterly, ISSN 1641-7291, E-ISSN 2082-5099, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early to Late Eocene bryozoans from the La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island were collected at two localities within the Cucullaea I Allomember (Telm4 and Telm5) on the northwestern side of the island and in two localities within the Submeseta Allomember (Telm6 and Telm7) on the northeastern side. This fauna is represented by cyclostomes of the suborders Tubuliporina and Cerioporina and suborders of Neocheilostomata, among which nine species have been recognized. The following new species are introduced: Micropora nordenskjoeldi sp. nov., Lunulites marambionis sp. nov., Otionellinaantarctica sp. nov. and Otionellina eocenica sp. nov. Some other taxa recognized in the studied material, such as Reticrescis plicatus, Uharella seymourensis and Celleporaria mesetaensis, were previously described from the lower most (Telm1) or uppermost parts (Telm6–7), thus their stratigraphical ranges within the La Meseta Formation are extended. The diverse...

  • 5.
    Hryniewicz, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warszawa, Poland.
    Bitner, Maria Aleksandra
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warszawa, Poland.
    Durska, Ewa
    Faculty of Geology, University of Warsaw, ul. Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02-089 Warszawa, Poland.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hjálmarsdóttir, Hanna Rósa
    The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS), Pb 156, NO-9171 Longyearbyen, Norway.
    Jenkins, Robert G.
    School of Natural System, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa City, Ishikawa 920-1192, Japan.
    Little, Crispin T.S.
    School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.
    Miyajima, Yusuke
    Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan.
    Nakrem, Hans Arne
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, PO Box 1172 Blindern, NO-0318 Oslo, Norway.
    Kaim, Andrzej
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Twarda 51/55, 00-818 Warszawa, Poland.
    Paleocene methane seep and wood-fall marine environments from Spitsbergen, SvalbardManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently discovered Paleocene seep locality from Fossildalen onSpitsbergen,Svalbard,is described. This is one of a very few seep communities of the latest Cretaceous–earliest Palaeogene age, and the best preserved Paleocene seep community known so far. The seep 2 carbonates and associated fossils have been first identified in museum collections, and subsequently sampled in the field. The carbonates are exclusively ex-situand come fromtheoffshore siltstones of the Basilika Formation. Isotopically light composition (δ13C values approaching -50‰ V-PDB), and characteristic petrographic textures of the carbonates combined with the isotopically lightarchaeal lipid are consistent with the formation at fossil hydrocarbon seep. The invertebrate fauna associated with the carbonates is of moderate diversity (16 species) and has a shallow water affinity. It containsa species of the thyasirid genus Conchocele, common in other seeps of that age. The finding sheds new light onto the history of seepage on Svalbard, and onto the evolutionand ecologyof seep faunas during the latest Cretaceous–earliest Palaeogenetime interval.

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