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  • 1. ALIPANAH, HELEN
    et al.
    ASSELBERGS, JAN
    MALM, TOBIAS
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    SLAMKA, FRANTIŠEK
    Taxonomic study of the subfamily Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)in Iran2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5289, no 1, p. 1-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-seven species of the subfamily Pyraustinae from 17 genera and two tribes are listed. Anania verbascalis verbascalis ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1949) is considered as a senior synonym of A. verbascalis parvalis (Osthelder, 1935) syn. n.; Pyrausta virginalis Duponchel, 1832 as a senior synonym of P. perkeo Amsel, 1970 syn. n.; and P. ferrealis (Hampson, 1900) as a senior synonym of P. euergestalis Amsel, 1954 syn. n. Thirteen species, namely Anania coronata (Hufnagel, 1767), A. murcialis (Ragonot, 1895), A. terrealis (Treitschke, 1829), Pyrausta ferrealis (Hampson, 1900), P. armeniaca Slamka, 2013, P. zeitunalis Caradja, 1916, P. cingulata (Linnaeus, 1758), P. delicatalis Caradja, 1916, P. tatarica Kemal et al., 2020, Loxostege sedakowialis (Eversmann, 1852), L. wagneri Zerny in Wagner, 1929, L. mucosalis (Herrich-Schäffer, 1848) and L. peltaloides (Rebel in Wagner, 1932), are newly reported from Iran. Additionally, a redescription of the male of P. delicatalis and the female of L. sedakowialis, as well as description of the hitherto unknown female of P. delicatalis are presented. The intraspecific variations of the species if present are discussed and additional new diagnostic characters to separate the closely related species are presented. Data on the geographical distribution of the Iranian species of this subfamily are provided.

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  • 2.
    Alipanah, Helen
    et al.
    Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection (IRIPP).
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Asselbergs, Jan
    A new species of Sitochroa Hübner, 1825 (Lepidoptera, Crambidae, Pyraustinae) from Iran, with taxonomic notes on the genus2020In: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 43, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sitochroa urmiensis sp. nov. is described based on a single male collected in West Azarbaijan Province, Iran. Sitochroa palealis (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) is considered as a senior synonym of Loxostege farsalis Amsel, 1950 syn. nov. Loxostege malekalis Amsel, 1950 is transferred to the genus Sitochroa Hübner, as S. malekalis (Amsel, 1950) comb. nov. And the hitherto unknown female of S. malekalis is described and illustrated.

  • 3.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Malm, Tobias
    Espeland, Marianne
    Molecular phylogeny of Sericostomatoidea(Trichoptera) with the establishment of three newfamilies2017In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 42, p. 240-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inferred the phylogenetic relationships among 58 genera of Sericostom-atoidea, representing all previously accepted families as well as genera that were notplaced in established families. The analyses were based on ve fragments of the proteincoding genes carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase of CAD), isocitrate dehydroge-nase (IDH), Elongation factor 1a (EF-1a), RNA polymerase II (POL II) and cytochromeoxidase I (COI). The data set was analysed using Bayesian methods with a mixedmodel, , and parsimony. The various methods generated slightly different resultsregarding relationships among families, but the shared results comprise support for: (i)a monophyletic Sericostomatoidea; (ii) a paraphyletic Parasericostoma due to inclusionof Myotrichia murina, leading to synonymization of Myotrichia with Parasericostoma;(iii) a polyphyletic Sericostomatidae, which is divided into two families, Sericostom-atidae sensu stricto and Parasericostomatidae fam.n.; (iv) a polyphyletic Helicophidaewhich is divided into Helicophidae sensu stricto and Heloccabucidae fam.n.; ( v) hypoth-esized phylogenetic placement of the former incerta sedis genera Ngoya, Seselpsycheand Karomana; (vi) a paraphyletic Costora (Conoesucidae) that should be divided intoseveral genera after more careful examination of morphological data; (vii) reinstatementof Gyrocarisa as a valid genus within Petrothrincidae. A third family, Ceylanopsychi-dae fam.n., is established based on morphological characters alone. A hypothesis ofthe relationship among 14 of the 15 families in the superfamily is presented. A key tothe families is presented based on adults (males). Taxonomic history, diagnosis, habitatpreference and distribution data for all sericostomatoid families are presented.

  • 4.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sjöberg, Tin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of three new species of Oecetis McLachlan, 1877 (Trichoptera: Leptoceridae) from Laos2021In: Aquatic Insects, ISSN 0165-0424, E-ISSN 1744-4152, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three new species of Oecetis McLachlan, 1877 from Laos are described, O. asymmetrica sp. n., O. conjuncta sp. n. and O. triangulata sp. n. Additional faunistic records are provided for two species already known from Laos: O. empusa Malicky and Chaibu, 2000 and O. raghava Schmid, 1995.

  • 5.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sjöberg, Tin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of two new species of Oecetis (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) from Borneo2022In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 819, p. 158-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new species of Oecetis from Maliau Basin, Malaysian Borneo, are described for the first time, O. mesospina sp. nov. and O. apelqvisti sp. nov. These two new species bring the total number of Oecetis found on the island of Borneo up to 16.

  • 6. Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Mary, Nathalie Jeanne
    Sjöberg, Tin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Eighteen new species of Oecetis McLachlan 1877 (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) from New Caledonia2020In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4809, no 2, p. 201-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eighteen new species of Oecetis are described, diagnosed, and illustrated from New Caledonia: Oecetis amphora sp. nov., Oecetis ovula sp. nov., Oecetis ramosa sp. nov., Oecetis loyolaensi sp. nov., Oecetis millei sp. nov., Oecetis christinae sp. nov., Oecetis rostrata sp. nov., Oecetis alicae sp. nov., Oecetis oxybelis sp. nov., Oecetis dorsospina sp. nov., Oecetis multidentata sp. nov., Oecetis gracilis sp. nov., Oecetis rostra sp. nov., Oecetis triramosa sp. nov., Oecetis flucta sp. nov., Oecetis nouvellecaledoniensis sp. nov., Oecetis variabilis sp. nov., and Oecetis ovata sp. nov. A diagnostic key is provided for males of Oecetis species of New Caledonia. The species display similarities in genitalic characteristics but also a high diversity of apomorphic features. The new species were collected from lotic habitats across most of Grande Terre.

  • 7.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pham, Thai Hong
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sjöberg, Tin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of six new species of Oecetis (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) from Vietnam2020In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4816, no 3, p. 311-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following six new Oecetis species have been described and illustrated: O. lata, O. gretae, O. malickyi, O. porntipae, O. olahi, and O. hageni. The following three Oecetis species are recorded for the first time from Vietnam: O. maron Malicky & Chantaramongkol 2005 (in Malicky 2005), O. iakchos Malicky 2005, and O. jachin Malicky & Mey 2010 (in Malicky 2010a). We present new records of the following six Oecetis species that are previously known from Vietnam: O. raghava Schmid 1995, O. biramosa Martynov 1936, O. tripunctata (Fabricius 1793), O. meleagros Malicky & Thani 2005, O. asmada Malicky 1979, and O. empusa Malicky & Chaibu 2000. A map presents the distribution of the Oecetis species included in this report.

  • 8.
    Leppänen, Sanna
    et al.
    Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Värri, Kaisa
    Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    A Comparative Analysis of Genetic Differentiation across Six Shared Willow Host Species in Leaf- and Bud-Galling Sawflies2014In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 1-19, article id e116286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic divergence and speciation in plant-feeding insects could be driven by contrasting selection pressures imposed by different plant species and taxa. While numerous examples of host-associated differentiation (HAD) have been found, the overall importance of HAD in insect diversification remains unclear, as few studies have investigated its frequency in relation to all speciation events. One promising way to infer the prevalence and repeatability of HAD is to estimate genetic differentiation in multiple insect taxa that use the same set of hosts. To this end, we measured and compared variation in mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS2 sequences in population samples of leaf-galling Pontania and bud-galling Euura sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) collected from six Salix species in two replicate locations in northern Fennoscandia. We found evidence of frequent HAD in both species complexes, as individuals from the same willow species tended to cluster together on both mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic trees. Although few fixed differences among the putative species were found, hierarchical AMOVAs showed that most of the genetic variation in the samples was explained by host species rather than by sampling location. Nevertheless, the levels of HAD measured across specific pairs of host species were not correlated in the two focal galler groups. Hence, our results support the hypothesis of HAD as a central force in herbivore speciation, but also indicate that evolutionary trajectories are only weakly repeatable even in temporally overlapping radiations of related insect taxa.

  • 9. Mally, Richard
    et al.
    Aarvik, Leif
    Karisch, Timm
    Lees, David C.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision of Afrotropical Udea Guenée in Duponchel, 1845, with description of five new species of the U. ferrugalis (Hübner, 1796) group (Lepidoptera, Crambidae, Spilomelinae)2022In: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 45, p. 315-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Udea species (currently six) present in the Afrotropical realm are revised based on adults. Phlyctaenia epicoena Meyrick, 1937 syn. nov. is found to be identical with U. ferrugalis (Hübner, 1796). Udea delineatalis (Walker in Melliss 1875) and U. hageni Viette, 1952 are redescribed. In addition, five species of Udea are described as new to science: U. kirinyaga Mally sp. nov. from Mount Kenya in Kenya, U. nicholsae Mally sp. nov., U. meruensis Mally sp. nov. and U. momella Mally sp. nov., all three from Mount Meru in Tanzania, and U. namaquana Karisch & Mally sp. nov. from South Africa. A phylogenetic analysis based on morphological data and mitochondrial COI as well as the nuclear wingless gene, where available, places the new species in the U. ferrugalis species group, which also comprises U. ferrugalis as well as U. delineatalis from the oceanic island of St. Helena. Another island endemic, Udea hageni from Tristan da Cunha, is found to be a member of the U. numeralis group, as sister to U. numeralis. An additional synapomorphic character of the genitalia is recognised for the U. ferrugalis group. Udea infuscalis (Zeller, 1852) and U. melanostictalis (Hampson in Poulton 1916) are misplaced in Udea and transferred to Pyraustinae, as Lirabotys infuscalis comb. nov. and Achyra melanostictalis comb. nov., respectively. Adults, tympanic organs, and genitalia of both sexes, where available, are illustrated. A checklist summarises the now eight Afrotropical Udea species.

  • 10.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Phylogeny of the symphytan grade of Hymenoptera: new pieces into the old jigsaw(fly) puzzle2015In: Cladistics, ISSN 0748-3007, E-ISSN 1096-0031, Vol. 31, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hymenoptera constitutes one of the largest, and ecologically and economically most important, insect orders. During thepast decade, a number of hypotheses on the phylogenetic relationships among hymenopteran families and superfamilies have beenpresented, based on analyses of molecular and/or morphological data. Nevertheless, many questions still remain, particularly concerningrelationships within the hyperdiverse suborder Apocrita, but also when it comes to the evolutionary history of the ancestrallyherbivorous “sawfly” lineages that form the basal, paraphyletic grade Symphyta. Because a large part of the uncertaintyappears to stem from limited molecular and taxonomic sampling, we set out to investigate the phylogeny of Hymenoptera usingnine protein-coding genes, of which five are new to analyses of the order. In addition, we more than tripled the taxon coverageacross the symphytan grade, introducing representatives for many previously unsampled lineages. We recover a well supportedphylogenetic structure for these early herbivorous hymenopteran clades, with new information regarding the monophyly of Xyelidae,the placement of the superfamily Pamphilioidea as sister to Tenthredinoidea + Unicalcarida, as well as the interrelationshipsamong the tenthredinoid families Tenthredinidae, Cimbicidae, and Diprionidae. Based on the obtained phylogenies, and to preventparaphyly of Tenthredinidae, we propose erection of the tribe Heptamelini to family status (Heptamelidae). In particular, ourresults give new insights into subfamilial relationships within the Tenthredinidae and other species-rich sawfly families. Thee xpanded gene set provides a useful toolbox for future detailed analyses of symphytan subgroups, especially within the diversesuperfamily Tenthredinoidea.

  • 11.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rota, Jadranka
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Chazot, Nicolas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Peña, Carlos
    HipLead, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A simple method for data partitioning based on relative evolutionary rates2018In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, p. 1-21, article id 6:e5498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Multiple studies have demonstrated that partitioning of molecular datasets is important in model-based phylogenetic analyses. Commonly, partitioning is done a priori based on some known properties of sequence evolution, e.g. differences in rate of evolution among codon positions of a protein-coding gene. Here we propose a new method for data partitioning based on relative evolutionary rates of the sites in the alignment of the dataset being analysed. The rates are inferred using the previously published Tree Independent Generation of Evolutionary Rates (TIGER), and the partitioning is conducted using our novel python script RatePartitions. We conducted simulations to assess the performance of our new method, and we applied it to eight published multi-locus phylogenetic datasets, representing different taxonomic ranks within the insect order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) and one phylogenomic dataset, which included ultra-conserved elements as well as introns.

    Methods. We used TIGER-rates to generate relative evolutionary rates for all sites in the alignments. Then, using RatePartitions, we partitioned the data into partitions based on their relative evolutionary rate. RatePartitions applies a simple formula that ensures a distribution of sites into partitions following the distribution of rates of the characters from the full dataset. This ensures that the invariable sites are placed in a partition with slowly evolving sites, avoiding the pitfalls of previously used methods, such as kmeans. Different partitioning strategies were evaluated using BIC scores as calculated by PartitionFinder.

    Results. Simulations did not highlight any misbehaviour of our partitioning approach, even under difficult parameter conditions or missing data. In all eight phylogenetic datasets, partitioning using TIGER-rates and RatePartitions was significantly better as measured by the BIC scores than other partitioning strategies, such as the commonly used partitioning by gene and codon position. We compared the resulting topologies and node support for these eight datasets as well as for the phylogenomic dataset.

    Discussion. We developed a new method of partitioning phylogenetic datasets without using any prior knowledge (e.g. DNA sequence evolution). This method is entirely based on the properties of the data being analysed and can be applied to DNA sequences (protein-coding, introns, ultra-conserved elements), protein sequences, as well as morphological characters. A likely explanation for why our method performs better than other tested partitioning strategies is that it accounts for the heterogeneity in the data to a much greater extent than when data are simply subdivided based on prior knowledge.

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  • 12.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    St Laurent, Ryan
    McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Florida Museum of Natural History, USA.
    McCabe, Timothy
    Dept. of Entomology, New York State Museum, USA.
    Revision of the genus Aleyda Schaus, 1928 with the description of one new species(Lepidoptera: Mimallonidae)2018In: SHILAP Revista de Lepidopterología, ISSN 0300-5267, E-ISSN 2340-4078, Vol. 46, no 181, p. 157-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Aleyda Schaus, 1928 is revised. The male of the type species of Aleyda, A. accipiter, is redescribed,and the female is figured for the first time. Aleyda heppneri St Laurent, McCabe & Malm, sp. n. from Panamá andFrench Guiana is newly described. Male and female genitalia of both species are figured for the first time.

  • 13.
    Nyman, Tommi
    et al.
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Onstein, Renske
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Silvestro, Daniele
    German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle–Jena–Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Wutke, Saskia
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg and Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Sweden.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut Müncheberg, Germany.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Blank, Stephan
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut Müncheberg, Germany.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The early wasp plucks the flower: disparate extant diversity of sawfly superfamilies (Hymenoptera:‘Symphyta’) may reflect asynchronous switching to angiosperm hosts2019In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insect order Hymenoptera originated during the Permian nearly 300 Mya. Ancestrally herbivorous hymenopteran lineages today make up the paraphyletic suborder ‘Symphyta’, which encompasses c. 8200 species with very diverse host-plant associations. We use phylogeny-based statistical analyses to explore the drivers of diversity dynamics within the ‘Symphyta’, with a particular focus on the hypothesis that diversification of herbivorous insects has been driven by the explosive radiation of angiosperms during and after the Cretaceous. Our ancestral-state estimates reveal that the first symphytans fed on gymnosperms, and that shifts onto angiosperms and pteridophytes – and back – have occurred at different time intervals in different groups. Trait-dependent analyses indicate that average net diversification rates do not differ between symphytan lineages feeding on angiosperms, gymnosperms or pteridophytes, but trait-independent models show that the highest diversification rates are found in a few angiosperm-feeding lineages that may have been favoured by the radiations of their host taxa during the Cenozoic. Intriguingly, lineages-through-time plots show signs of an early Cretaceous mass extinction, with a recovery starting first in angiosperm-associated clades. Hence, the oft-invoked assumption of herbivore diversification driven by the rise of flowering plants may overlook a Cretaceous global turnover in insect herbivore communities during the rapid displacement of gymnosperm- and pteridophyte-dominated floras by angiosperms.

  • 14.
    Prous, Marko
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Blank, Stephan M.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Goulet, Henri
    Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Ottawa, Canada.
    Heibo, Erik
    Ento Consulting, Lierskogen, Norway.
    Liston, Andrew
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nyman, Tommi
    University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Schmidt, Stefan
    Zoologische Staatssammlung, Munich, Germany.
    Smith, Dave
    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, United States of America.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Viitasaari, Matti
    Unaffiliated, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vikberg, Veli
    Unaffiliated, Turenki, Finland.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    The genera of Nematinae (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2014In: Journal of Hymenoptera Research, ISSN 1314-2607, Vol. 40, p. 1-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent phylogenetic studies on Nematinae based on DNA sequences have shown extensive incongruencies with current nomenclature of genus-group taxa. Here, we expand previous DNA sequence datasets based on three genes (CoI, Cytb, and EF-1α), to include a fourth (NaK) and more genera. The analyses largely confirm the previous findings, particularly the existence of two well-supported large clades, Euura and Pristiphora, together comprising more than 75% of the species of Nematinae. Basal relationships within these two clades remain poorly resolved, mirroring the difficulties in delimiting genera based on morphology. In addition, a moderately supported small clade, Nematus, is found. The relationships between the Euura, Pristiphora, and Nematus clades are uncertain. Therefore, to stabilize the nomenclature we treat these clades as genera. This taxonomic treatment results in numerous new combinations of species names. The following synonymies are proposed for the available genus-group names. Synonyms of Euura Newman, 1837: Cryptocampus Hartig, 1837, Euura Agassiz, 1848, Pontania Costa, 1852, syn. n., Epitactus Förster, 1854, syn. n., Amauronematus Konow, 1890, syn. n., Holcocneme Konow, 1890, syn. n., Pachynematus Konow, 1890, syn. n., Holcocnema Schulz, 1906, syn. n., Holcocnemis Konow, 1907, syn. n., Pteronidea Rohwer, 1911, syn. n., Pontopristia Malaise, 1921, syn. n., Brachycoluma Strand, 1929, syn. n., Decanematus Malaise, 1931, syn. n., Pikonema Ross, 1937, syn. n., Phyllocolpa Benson, 1960, syn. n., Eitelius Kontuniemi, 1966, syn. n., Gemmura E.L. Smith, 1968, Eupontania Zinovjev, 1985, syn. n., Larinematus Zhelochovtsev, 1988, syn. n., Polynematus Zhelochovtsev, 1988, syn. n., Bacconematus Zhelochovtsev, 1988, syn. n., Alpinematus Lacourt, 1996, syn. n., Epicenematus Lacourt, 1998, syn. n., Kontuniemiana Lacourt, 1998, syn. n., Lindqvistia Lacourt, 1998, syn. n., Luea Wei and Nie, 1998, syn. n., and Tubpontania Vikberg, 2010, syn. n. Synonyms of Nematus Panzer, 1801: Craesus Leach, 1817, Hypolaepus W.F. Kirby, 1882, and Paranematus Zinovjev, 1978. Synonyms of Pristiphora Latreille, 1810: Diphadnus Hartig, 1837, Lygaeonematus Konow, 1890, Micronematus Konow, 1890, Gymnonychus Marlatt, 1896, Neopareophora MacGillivray, 1908, syn. n., Neotomostethus MacGillivray, 1908, Dineuridea Rohwer, 1912, Sala Ross, 1937, Pristola Ross, 1945, syn. n., Nepionema Benson, 1960, syn. n., Melastola Wong, 1968, syn. n., Sharliphora Wong, 1969, Oligonematus Zhelochovtsev, 1988, Lygaeotus Liston, 1993, Lygaeophora Liston, 1993, and Pristicampus Zinovjev, 1993, syn. n. Varna Ross, 1937, syn. n. is treated as a synonym of Dineura Dahlbom 1835. Stauronematus Benson, 1953 is treated as a separate genus from Pristiphora. Names of 20 species-group taxa are junior secondary homonyms when combined with Euura. Replacement names are proposed for these. To facilitate the identification of Nematinae genera, we provide an illustrated key to the 31 extant genera of world Nematinae.

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  • 15.
    Raviglione, Mario C.
    et al.
    227 Impasse des Alouettes, F-01280 Prévessin-Moëns, France.
    Rougerie, Rodolphe
    Zolotuhin, Vadim
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Landry, Bernard
    Muséum d'histoire naturelle, C.P. 6434, CH-1211 Genève 6, Switzerland.
    New information on Trichophiala devylderi Aurivillius, 1879. Full description of both sexes, genetic study and lectotype designation (Lepidoptera, Eupterotidae)2022In: Revue suisse de zoologie, ISSN 0035-418X, ISSN ISSN 0035-418, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 283-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Described from Namibia, Trichophiala devylderi Aurivillius, 1879 is a species for which, apart from the original description of female “types”, little is known. Building upon recent observations in the field, investigations in variousmuseums that preserve specimens, and a review of the literature, we describe for the first time the habitat, the knowndistribution, the morphology of both sexes including the presence of two phenotypes, and the genitalia of both male andfemale. We also provide genetic information from several specimens that reveal little variation in the standard animalDNA barcode. Finally, we designate a lectotype among the three specimens preserved at the Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet,Stockholm, Sweden

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  • 16.
    Schmidt, Stefan
    et al.
    SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Munich, Germany.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Morinière, Jérôme
    SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Munich, Germany.
    Liston, Andrew
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Blank, Stephan
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Kramp, Katja
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Kraus, Manfred
    Nürnberg, Germany.
    Schmidt, Olga
    SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Munich, Germany.
    Heibo, Erik
    Lierskogen, Norway.
    Prous, Marko
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    Nyman, Tommi
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Stahlhut, Julie
    Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Identification of sawflies and horntails (Hymenoptera, ‘Symphyta’) through DNA barcodes: successes and caveats2017In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998, Vol. 17, p. 670-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘Symphyta’ is a paraphyletic assemblage at the base of the order Hymenoptera, comprising 14 families and about 8750 species. All have phytophagous larvae, except for the Orussidae, which are parasitoids. This study presents and evaluates the results of DNA barcoding of approximately 5360 specimens of ‘Symphyta’, mainly adults, and 4362 sequences covering 1037 species were deemed of suitable quality for inclusion in the analysis. All extant families are represented, except for the Anaxyelidae. The majority of species and specimens are from Europe, but approximately 38% of the species and 13% of the specimens are of non-European origin. The utility of barcoding for species identification and taxonomy of ‘Symphyta’ is discussed on the basis of examples from each of the included families. A significant level of cryptic species diversity was apparent in many groups. Other attractive applications include the identification of immature stages without the need to rear them, community analyses based on metabarcoding of bulk samples and association of the sexes of adults.

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