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  • 1. Loch, Carolona
    et al.
    BUONO, Monica
    KALTHOFF, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    FERNANDEZ, Martha
    Enamel microstructure in Eocene cetaceans from Antarctica (Archaeoceti and Mysticeti)2020In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu
    Boissin, Emilie
    Chenuil, Anne
    Resolving the Ophioderma longicauda (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) cryptic species complex: five sisters, three of them new2020In: European Jpurnal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 600, p. 1-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Rhodén, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The phylogeny of Empis and Rhamphomyia (Diptera, Empididae) investigated using UCEs including an over 150 years old museum specimen2020In: Evolutionary Systematics, ISSN 2535-0730, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kimura, Yuri
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac
    Institut Català de Paleontologia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Lee, Taekjun
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bae, Yeon Jae
    Shin, Sook
    A New Fissiparous Brittle Star, Ophiacantha scissionis sp. nov. (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Ophiacanthida), from Jeju Island, Korea2019In: Zoological Studies, ISSN 1021-5506, E-ISSN 1810-522X, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    O'Connor, Patrick M.
    Ohio Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies, Athens, Ohio, USA.
    Roberts, Eric M.
    James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
    A new mammal from the Turonian–Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Galula Formation, southwestern Tanzania2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 65-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here establish a newmammaliaform genus and species, Galulatheriumjenkinsi (Mammalia), from the UpperCretaceous Galula Formation in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. Thisrepresents the first named taxon of a mammaliaform from the entire Late Cretaceous,an interval of 34 million years, of continental Afro-Africa. Preliminary studyof the holotype (a partial dentary) resulted in tentative assignation to the Gondwanatheria,a poorly known, enigmatic clade of Late Cretaceous–Paleogene Gondwanan mammals (Krauseet al. 2003). The application of advanced imaging (µCT) and visualizationtechniques permits a more detailed understanding of key anatomical features of thenew taxon. CT analysis reveals that the lower dentition consisted of a large,procumbent lower incisor and four cheek teeth, all which are ever growing(hypselodont). Importantly, all of the teeth appear to have been devoid ofenamel during life. Comparisons conducted with a range of Mesozoic and selectedCenozoic mammaliaform groups demonstrates that a number of features (e.g.,enamel-less and ever-growing teeth, columnar cheek teeth with relatively simpleocclusal morphology) expressed in Galulatheriumare reminiscent of disparate groups, making taxonomic assignment difficult. Hereinwe retain the provisional referral of Galulatherium(RRBP 02067) to Gondwanatheria; it is most similar to sudamericids such as Lavanify and Bharratherium from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and India,respectively, which exhibit relatively simple, high-crowned, columnar cheek teeth.Other features (e.g., enamel-less dentition) shared with disparate forms suchas the Late Jurassic Fruitafossor andvarious xenarthrans (e.g., sloths) are attributed to convergence. Detailed analysesof the depositional context for the type and only specimen place it as havinglived sometime between the late Turonian and latest Campanian (roughly 91–72million years ago). This enhanced geochronological context helps to refine thepalaeobiogeographical significance of Galulatheriumamong Cretaceous mammals in general and those of Gondwanan landmassesspecifically.

  • 8.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A review of West Palaearctic Hoplocampa species, focussing on Sweden (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4615, no 1, p. 1-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen Hoplocampa species have been recorded in the West Palaearctic. We provide an illustrated key to these species, together with H. tadshikistanica, which is so far only known from Tadshikistan, but could occur in the West Palaearctic. The suitability of genetic sequencing for identification, particularly of larvae, is discussed. COI barcoding reliably distinguishes all European species which have been sampled (only H. phantoma lacks data), except for H. fulvicornis and H. minuta, which can be identified using nuclear sequences. Distributions in the Fennoscandian countries are outlined, with particular reference to Sweden. Hoplocampa chrysorrhoea is recorded for the first time in Scandinavia, from southern Sweden. Lectotypes are designated for twelve nominal taxa: Allantus ferrugineus Panzer, 1802, Hoplocampa chrysorrhoea var. nigrita Enslin, 1914, H. fabricii W. F. Kirby, 1882, H. oertzeni Konow, 1888, H. pectoralis Thomson, 1871, Hylotoma ferruginea Fabricius, 1804, Tenthredo alpina Zetterstedt, 1838, T. brevis Klug, 1816, T. chrysorrhoea Klug, 1816, T. crataegi Klug, 1816, T. plagiata Klug, 1816, and T. rutilicornis Klug, 1816. Hoplocampa minuta forma dudai Gregor, in Gregor & Bata, 1942 is a new synonym of H. fulvicornis (Panzer, 1801).

  • 9.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    A taxonomic review and revisions of Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha)2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0212073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha) diversity has been almost entirely ignored within recent years, likely due to inconsistent and often old taxonomic literature and a general rarity of sexually mature collected specimens. Herein, we reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of the group using both previously published and new 18S and CO1 gene sequences. We present some taxonomic revisions of Microstomidae and further describe 8 new species of Microstomum based on both molecular and morphological evidence. Finally, we briefly review the morphological taxonomy of each species and provide a key to aid in future research and identification that is not dependent on reproductive morphology. Our goal is to clarify the taxonomy and facilitate future research into an otherwise very understudied group of tiny (but important) flatworms.

  • 10. Fatemi, Yaser
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Annotated species list of Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata) from the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman, with new records2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4711, no 1, p. 77-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Fernandez, Diana E.
    et al.
    Giachetti, Luciana
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Thuy, Ben
    Perez, Damian E.
    Comerio, Marcos
    Pazos, Pablo J.
    Brittle stars from the Lower Cretaceous of Patagonia: first ophiuroid articulated remains for the Mesozoic of South America2019In: Andean Geology, ISSN 0718-7092, E-ISSN 0718-7106, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 421-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Campydoroides manautei gen. et sp. nov. from New Caledonia and reappraisal of suborder Campydorina (Nematoda)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, Vol. 518, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Stålstedt, Jeanette
    et al.
    Laydanowicz, Joanna
    Lehtinen, Pekka T
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Makol, Joanna
    Checklist of terrestrial Parasitengona mites in Fennoscandia with new species- and distribution records (Acariformes: Prostigmata)2019In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 7, article id e36094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The knowledge of terrestrial Parasitengona in Fennoscandia lies far behind that of their aquatic counterparts, the water mites (Hydrachnidia). Based on new inventories, we provide primary data and an annotated checklist of terrestrial Parasitengona in Fennoscandia including 107 species. Out of these, nineteen species are new findings for the region and five are species potentially new for science. Twenty-three species are new for Norway, fourteen for Finland and eleven for Sweden. The known recorded fauna today of terrestrial Parasitengona is 80 species for Norway, 54 for Sweden and 48 for Finland. Primary data include georeferenced locality data as well as collecting techniques and microhabitat to increase the knowledge on species' habitat requirements.

  • 14.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Clark, Elizabeth G.
    Thuy, Ben
    Darroch, Simon A.F.
    Comparison of 2D SEM imaging with 3D micro-tomographic imaging for phylogenetic inference in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)2019In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 15, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Schulz-Kornas, Ellen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
    Corfe, Ian
    University of Helsinki.
    Martin, Thomas
    Universität Bonn.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schultz, Julia A.
    Universität Bonn.
    Complementary approaches to tooth wear analysisin Tritylodontidae (Synapsida, Mammaliamorpha)reveal a generalist diet.2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1-24, article id e0220188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoscopic microwear and 3D surface texture analyses on the cheek teeth of ten Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous tritylodontid (Mammaliamorpha) taxa of small/medium to large body size suggest that all were generalist feeders and none was a dietary specialist adapted to herbivory. There was no correspondence between body size and food choice. Stereomicroscopic microwear analysis revealed predominantly fine wear features with numerous small pits and less abundant fine scratches as principal components. Almost all analyzed facets bear some coarser microwear features, such as coarse scratches, large pits, puncture pits and gouges pointing to episodic feeding on harder food items or exogenous effects (contamination of food with soil grit and/or dust), or both. 3D surface texture analysis indicates predominantly fine features with large void volume, low peak densities, and various stages of roundness of the peaks. We interpret these features to indicate consumption of food items with low to moderate intrinsic abrasiveness and can exclude regular rooting, digging or caching behavior. Possible food items include plant vegetative parts, plant reproductive structures (seeds and seed-bearing organs), and invertebrates (i.e., insects). Although the tritylodontid tooth morphology and auto-occlusion suggest plants as the primary food resource, our results imply a wider dietary range including animal matter.

  • 16.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier
    Bleichestrasse 15, Basel CH-4058, Switzerland..
    Contribution to the knowledge of Swedish Dacnusini (Hymenoptera, Braconidae: Alysiinae): checklist and seven new species records2019In: JOURNAL OF INSECT BIODIVERSITY AND SYSTEMATICS, ISSN ISSN: 2423-8112, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 221-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of seven Dacnusini (Hym., Braconidae, Alysiinae) species are recorded for the first time for Sweden: Antrusa chrysotegula (Tobias, 1986), Aristelix phaenicura (Haliday, 1839), Chorebus (Phaenolexis) caesariatus Griffiths, 1967, Chorebus (Chorebus) scabrifossa Stelfox, 1957, Coelinidea gracilis (Curtis, 1829), Eucoelinidea compressa Tobias, 1979 and Sarops rea Nixon, 1942. Moreover, the genera Aristelix Nixon, 1943, Eucoelinidea Tobias, 1979 and Sarops Nixon, 1942 are thus recorded for the first time in Sweden. Finally, a checklist of the Swedish Dacnusini species is provided.

  • 17.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Den entomologiska verksamheten på RIksmuseet 1915-20132019In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief history of entomology at the Swedish Museum of Natural History for the period 1915-1923 is presented in chronicle form. The time circumscription has its background in a recent 100th anniversary of the current museum building, for which there was work on an anniversary book, which has not appeared, and this is based on a contribution originally intended for that book. It concerns primarily the Entomology department (which ended as a unit in 2013 when it was part of a fusion into a Zoology department) but also includes the Entomological Society of Stockholm to the extent it has been based at the museum, as well as insect-related work in other museum departments. The chronicle gives plenty of examples of research and researchers, other staff and routines, collection growth and management, collecting expeditions and publications, work environment issues and everyday life at the department.

  • 18.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of Cribronema sturhani sp. n. (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae), a second species of a rare genus from Cameroon2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4695, no 2, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sven, Boström
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Descriptions of species of Acrobeles von Linstow, 1877 (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae) from Kelso Dunes, Mojave National Preserve, California, USA2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4651, p. 330-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Discovery of a specialist Copelatinae fauna on Madagascar: highly ephemeral tropical forest floor depressions as an overlooked habitat for diving beetles (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2019In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 871, p. 89-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diving beetles are generally aquatic and live submerged in water during larval and adult stages. A few groupshave colonised hygropetric habitats and fewer species still can possibly be referred to as terrestrial. Here wedescribe six new Copelatine species that were mainly found in dry shallow forest floor depressions in the easternand northeastern lowland humid forests of Madagascar. Three new species are described in each of thetwo genera Copelatus and Madaglymbus: Copelatus amphibius sp. nov., Copelatus betampona sp. nov., Copelatuszanatanensis sp. nov., Madaglymbus kelimaso sp. nov., Madaglymbus menalamba sp. nov., and Madaglymbussemifactus sp. nov. Diagnosis, description, known distribution, ecology, and conservation notes areprovided for each species. All species are illustrated with a dorsal habitus image, ventral and lateral views ofthe male penis, and parameres. Photographs of the unusual terrestrial habitats where the species were foundare provided. Madaglymbus menalamba sp. nov. is also documented with macrophotos and videorecordingsof the terrestrial locomotion and behaviour in the field. Although these species should not be classified asterrestrial, or even semi-terrestrial Dytiscidae, they seem to be specialists of very ephemeral aquatic habitatsand stay put instead of disperse when the habitat dries up. It is hypothesised that this lifestyle and behaviouron Madagascar is restricted to the high-precipitation humid forest regions mainly in the east. It may alsorepresent a transition step, or stepping-stone, towards becoming fully terrestrial, a step that the few knownterrestrial Dytiscid taxa once passed through. It is very likely that this type of habitat is overlooked for aquaticbeetles, not only in Madagascar, and the six species herein described may be just the “tip of the iceberg”.

  • 21.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Diversitet hos hakmaskar - tarmparasiter hos gråsälar i Östersjön2019In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Delling, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Evolution and disappearance of sympatric Coregonus albula ina changing environment—A case study of the only remainingpopulation pair in Sweden2019In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, no 22, p. 12727-12753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past 50 years, Fennoscandian populations of spring‐spawning Baltic cisco

    (

    Coregonus albula), sympatric to common autumn‐spawners, have declined or disappeared;

    for example, three out of four known spring‐spawning populations in Sweden

    are regarded as extinct. Over the same period, the climate has changed and populations

    have been subject to other anthropogenic stressors. We compared historic

    (1960s) and recent (1990–000s) morphological data from the still‐existent sympatric

    cisco populations in Lake Fegen, Sweden. Phenotypic changes were found for

    spring‐spawners making them more similar to the sympatric autumn‐spawners that

    had remained virtually unchanged. Based on results for other salmoniform fishes,

    a phenotypically plastic response to increased temperature during early development

    appears unlikely. The recent material was also analyzed with microsatellite

    markers; long‐term effective population size in spring‐spawners was estimated to

    be about 20 times lower than autumn‐spawners, with signs of long‐term gene flow

    in both directions and a recent genetic bottleneck in spring‐spawners. We suggest

    the change toward a less distinct phenotype in spring‐spawners to reflect a recent

    increase in gene flow from autumn‐spawners. Time since divergence was estimated

    to only

    c. 1,900 years (95% CI: 400–5,900), but still the Fegen populations represent

    the most morphologically and genetically distinct sympatric populations studied.

    Consequently, we hypothesize that less distinct population pairs can be even

    younger and that spring‐spawning may have repeatedly evolved and disappeared in

    several lakes since the end of the last glaciation, concurrent with changed environmental

    conditions.

  • 23.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    FACEPAI: a script for fast and consistent environmental DNA processing and identification2019In: BMC Ecology, ISSN 1472-6785, E-ISSN 1472-6785, Vol. 19, p. 51-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Smythe, Ashleigh
    et al.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kocot, Kevin
    Improved phylogenomic sampling of free-living nematodes enhances resolution of higher-level nematode phylogeny2019In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kartläggning av tvåvingar med miljö-DNA – mer än bara en fluga2019In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 20-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Oláh, János
    et al.
    private.
    Andersen, Trond
    Beshkov, S
    Bilalli, A
    Coppa, G
    Ibrahimi, H
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Kovacs, T
    Mey, W
    Musliu, M
    Olah Jr, J
    Ruiz-Garcia, A
    Lineage sorting by parameres in Limnephilinae subfamily (Trichoptera): with description of a new tribe, new genera and new species2019In: Opuscula Zoologica Instituti Zoosystematici et Oecologici Universitatis Budapestinensis, ISSN 0237-5419, E-ISSN 2063-1588, Vol. 50, no S1, p. 3-98, article id 31329FBB-5B10-4B5E-8F7D-56DA267CAD78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of the new Agaphylax genus with unique paramere organisation has initiated our lineage sorting oftribes by parameres in the Limnephilinae subfamily applying the principles and procedures of fine phenomics in order toestablish transformation series of the polarized plesiomorphy-apomorphy character states for each limnephiline genera.According to the extraordinary high diversity the paramere that is the stimulatory and titillating structure of the phallic organis a speciation supertrait. This adaptive trait is directly involved in the processes of reproductive isolation and diverging assubtle initial split of lineages producing the incipient sibling species in the recent past of contemporary speciation processes.Contrary, the drastic divergence of the Agaphylax plated paramere is much older, similarly to the many-spined parameres ofthe Hesperophylacini tribe. It has been initiated by drastic combined and synchronous external and internal stochastic effects,processed in ancestral sexual integrative adaptation as well as organised and fixed in older and deeper coalescence events andappears as a character with tribe ranking potential. To open a wider perspective, a systemic relational analysis is required inthe future including other adaptive or neutral character transformation series, due to the burden of taxonomic incongruencesgrounded by chimerism in stochastic genetic reticulation. Traits of species are mixed products coming from various sources.Only character combinations can and ought to be analysed in terms how to classify taxa. We have polarized eight genitaliccharacters additional to parameres for a future analysis of the potential of character combinations.Limnephilinae subfamily is composed of Limnephilini, Chilostigmatini, Chaetopterygini, Stenophylacini and Hesperophylacinitribes and here we established the new Agaphylacini tribe. Based on parameres we have delineated taxa in lineagesorting and described two new genera: Fogophylax gen. nov., Simaphylax gen. nov. and fourteen new species: Anaboliaalsoja, A. hepehupa, Asynarchus kimaros, Limnephilus kerekes, L. maghrebensis, L. oblos, Homophylax beges, H. coros,Chaetopteroides plackovicensis, C. rilaensis, Allogamus ketpar, Platyphylax beshkovi, Pycnopsyche letova and P. telea spp.nov. The by-product of this survey is a world atlas of paramere drawings for the entire Limnephilinae subfamily.

  • 27.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Harper Adams University.
    Back, Matthew
    Prior, Thomas
    Karssen, Gerrit
    Lawson, Rebecca
    Adams, Ian
    Sapp, Melanie
    Metabarcoding of soil nematodes: the importance of taxonomiccoverage and availability of reference sequences in choosingsuitable marker(s)2019In: Metabarcoding and Metagenomics, Vol. 3, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ivković, Marija
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Previšić, Ana
    University of Zagreb.
    Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography provide insights into the subgeneric classification of Wiedemannia Zetterstedt (Diptera: Empididae: Clinocerinae)2019In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 44, p. 559-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subgenera of Wiedemannia are poorly defined and, as such, most recently described species are not assigned to a subgenus or have been assigned to a subgenus without explanation. In this study we perform a molecular phylogenetic analysis to elucidate relationships within the genus Wiedemannia. We sequenced two mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase c subunit I and cytochrome β) and two nuclear (carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary and elongation factor‐1α) gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among the subgenera ChamaedipsiaEucelidiaPhilolutraPseudowiedemanniaRoederella and Wiedemannia (s.s.) using both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood approaches. The genus was found to be monophyletic, but most of the subgenera were not. We propose eliminating the present subgeneric division altogether. Molecular dating using a log‐normal clock model and calibration with fossil species indicated that Wiedemannia diversified about 48 Ma, while there was still land connectivity between Europe and Asia with North America. Wiedemannia has a near‐worldwide distribution apart from the Australasian and Neotropical regions and Antarctica, with greatest species richness in the western Palaearctic, especially the Mediterranean region. Molecular phylogenetics support more recent morphological studies. The subgenera of Wiedemannia are invalid and rejected. Biogeographical data suggest potential hotspots, and the current distribution is discussed.

  • 29.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wayland, Matthew
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Morphological observations on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala, Polymorphidae)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, Vol. 514, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New and known species of the genus Campylaimus Cobb, 1920 (Nematoda: Araeolaimida: Diplopeltidae) from North European marine habitats2019In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 7, article id e46545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Wells, Alice
    New Caledonia's Trichoptera—present status of knowledge2019In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 14, p. 87-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Trichoptera recorded from New Caledonia were four species described by Kimmins in 1953, each in anew endemic genus. The diversity was increased to eight species with the publication by Sykora in 1967 of threenew species in two new genera and a fourth species in a previously established genus. Today, 239 valid species areknown from the country, representing 20 genera in 10 families. Analysis of published records for some 32,000Trichoptera specimens collected from 291 localities shows that the highest species diversity is in the SE part of theGrande Terre, and that species diversity is greatest at lower altitudes, i.e. 0–200 meters above sea level. We also seethat the three most frequently collected families (85% of the individuals) in the sampled material are Hydroptilidae(35%), followed by Hydropsychidae (27%), and Leptoceridae (22%). Phylogenetic analyses have demonstratedthat the first species to occupy the island and the earliest radiations took place on areas covered by ultrabasicsubstrate, which is poor in nutrients and rich in certain toxic heavy metals.

  • 32. Perkins, Philip D
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New Myxophagan water beetles from Madagascar(Coleoptera: Torridincolidae, Hydroscaphidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4657, no 1, p. 57-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myxophagan water beetles from Madagascar are comprehensively revised. Holotypes of the two previously known speciesare re-described and illustrated. Six new species of Incoltorrida Steffan and one new species of Hydroscapha LeConte aredescribed and illustrated. The larvae of Incoltorrida quintacostata are illustrated and discussed. The presence of peritrichciliates of the genus Platycola Kent on specimens of Incoltorrida madagassica Steffan is discussed and illustrated.Habitus, habitats, and male genitalia are illustrated, and distributions are mapped. The following new species are described(type localities parenthetic): Incoltorrida benesculpta n. sp. (Fianarantsoa, 3.2km S Ambohimanjaka); I. galoko n. sp.(Antsiranana, Diana, Ambilobe, Antsaba, Galoko mountains ); I. magna n. sp. (Antsiranana, Diana, Ambilobe, Antsaba,Galoko mountains); I. marojejy n. sp. (Antsiranana, Sava, Marojejy National Park); I. quintacostata n. sp. (Fianarantsoa,3.5km N Ivato); I. zahamena n. sp. (Toamasina, Alaotra-Mangoro, Zahamena National Park); Hydroscapha andringitran. sp. (Fianarantsoa, Ambilavao, Sendrisoa, approx. 10km N of Andringitra National Park).

  • 33.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rhodén, Caroline
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New records of dance flies (Hybotidae) and dagger flies (Empididae) in Sweden and a significant addition of genetic barcodes of the Swedish empidoid fauna2019In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    NRM Brief history and description of the ichthyological collection of the Swedish Museum of Natural History, with emphasis on the Neotropical component2019In: Boletim Sociedade Brasileira de Ictiologia, ISSN 1808-1436, Vol. 129, p. 103-105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35. Movalli, Paola
    et al.
    Duke, Guy
    Ramello, Gloria
    Dekker, René
    Vrezec, Al
    Shore, Richard F.
    García-Fernández, Antonio
    Wernham, Chris
    Krone, Oliver
    Alygizakis, Nikiforos
    Badry, Alexander
    Barbagli, Fausto
    Biesmeijer, Koos
    Boano, Giovanni
    Bond, Alexander L.
    Choresh, Yael
    Christensen, Jan Bolding
    Cincinelli, Alessandra
    Danielsson, Sara
    Dias, Andreia
    Dietz, Rune
    Eens, Marcel
    Espín, Silvia
    Eulaers, Igor
    Frahnert, Sylke
    Fuiz, Tibor I.
    Gkotsis, Georgios
    Glowacka, Natalia
    Gómez-Ramírez, Pilar
    Grotti, Marco
    Guiraud, Michel
    Hosner, Peter
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jaspers, Veerle L.B.
    Kamminga, Pepijn
    Koschorreck, Jan
    Knopf, Burkhard
    Kubin, Eero
    LoBrutto, Sabrina
    Lourenco, Rui
    Martellini, Tania
    Martínez-López, Emma
    Mateo, Rafael
    Nika, Maria-Christina
    Nikolopoulou, Varvara
    Osborn, Dan
    Pauwels, Olivier
    Pavia, Marco
    Pereira, M. Glória
    Rüdel, Heinz
    Sanchez-Virosta, Pablo
    Slobodnik, Jaroslav
    Sonne, Christian
    Thomaidis, Nikolaos
    Töpfer, Till
    Treu, Gabriele
    Väinölä, Risto
    Valkama, Jari
    van der Mije, Steven
    Vangeluwe, Didier
    Warren, Ben H.
    Woog, Friederike
    Progress on bringing together raptor collections in Europe for contaminant research and monitoring in relation to chemicals regulation2019In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 26, p. 20132-20136Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Black, Andrew B.
    et al.
    Jansen, Justin J.F.
    Frahnert, Sylke
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Provisional identification of historical grasswren(Amytornis: Maluridae) specimens in European collectionsdraws attention to the incomplete phylogeny of the group2019In: Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club, ISSN 0007-1595, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny and systematics of grasswrens Amytornis species areincompletely resolved, in particular for three widely distributed members ofthe genus. In part this is a consequence of the dispersal to European and NorthAmerican collections of early specimens of now extinct populations. We describethree historical grasswren specimens from museums in Berlin and Stockholm, all ofwhich represent taxa for which phylogenetic and / or other data are incomplete. Wefurther identify other specimens that might contribute towards greater resolutionof grasswren phylogeny.

  • 37.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision and morphological analysis of the Ragadidae (Insecta, Diptera)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 0, no 521, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several taxonomic groups within Empidoidea Latreille, 1809 have been subject to unclear phylogenetic assignments along with multiple parallel hypotheses causing difficulties in classification and morphological identification. This study reviews the internal classification of the Ragadidae and includes a diagnosis and description of all included subfamilies and genera based on the results of an analysis of morphological characters using maximum parsimony. Illustration of important characters and a key to all genera in the family is given. The genus Hormopeza Zetterstedt, 1838 is found to be most closely related to Anthepiscopus Becker, 1891 and Iteaphila Zetterstedt, 1838, and the subfamily Iteaphilinae Wahlberg & Johanson, 2018 is therefore expanded to also include that genus. Hormopeza is consequently excluded from Ragadinae Sinclair, 2016. This study provides diagnoses, descriptions and keys in a contribution to a thorough classification of the empidoid groups and increased ease in morphological recognition.

  • 38.
    Oláh, János
    et al.
    private.
    Andersen, Trond
    Beshkov, S.
    Coppa, G.
    Ruiz Garcia, A
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Revision of European Wormaldia species (Trichoptera, Philopotamidae):Chimeric taxa of integrative organisation2019In: Opuscula Zoologica Instituti Zoosystematici et Oecologici Universitatis Budapestinensis, ISSN 0237-5419, E-ISSN 2063-1588, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 31-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recognised significant incongruences among the most commonly used taxonomic characters in theEuropean species of Wormaldia genus of the Philopotamidae caddisfly family. During taxonomical analysis and rankingprocedures we have recorded incongruent, discorcordant characters also in the taxa in Rhyacophilidae, Hydropsychidae andLimnephilidae caddisfly families. Based on theoretical background we concluded that taxa of examined caddisflies andprobably all living creatures are chimeric entities composed of components of different origin. Genomes and phenomes aretree-like on the surface but more reticulated in the deep. We understand chimerism with universal consequences, expandingwell beyond the evolutionary tree-thinking of reductionism and determinism. Taxa are chimeric or at least chimerical in astochastic universe under the permanent fluxes of the external and internal impacts created by intercourses between entropyand energy gradients. We have surveyed how to create and correct synonymies in the splitter/lumper perspectives along theprinciples of compositional and specification hierarchies understood as quantitative variability of non-adaptive neutral andqualitative stability of adaptive, non-neutral traits. We outlined how the apophantic (declaratory) hybris creates synonymiesand underestimates biodiversity. After redrawing the diverging genitalic structures, particularly the speciation traits we havereinstated species status of eight taxa: W. trifida Andersen, 1983 stat.restit, stat. nov., W. albanica Oláh, 2010 stat. restit., W.bulgarica Novak, 1971 stat. nov., W. daga Oláh, 2014 stat. restit., W. graeca Oláh, 2014 stat. restit., W. busa Oláh, 2014 stat.restit., W. homora Oláh, 2014 stat. restit. W. nielseni Moretti, 1981 stat. nov. Character selection and lineage sortingprocedures established the following species groups, species complexes and species clades in the European species ofWormaldia: W. occipitalis species group: W. occipitalis species complex; W. charalambi species group; W. copiosa speciesgroup; W. triangulifera species group: W. bulgarica species complex, W. khourmai species complex, W. subnigra speciescomplex: W. asterusia species clade, W. subnigra species clade, W. vercorsica species clade; W. triangulifera speciescomplex, W. variegate species complex. Unplaced species: W. ambigua, W. algirica, W. sarda. In this revision we havedescribed fourteen new species: W. longiseta, W. carpathica, W. kurta, W. parba, W. foslana, W. kumanskii, W. libohova, W.silva, W. gorba, W. kera, W. rona, W. sima, W. granada, W. telva.

  • 39. Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier
    et al.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Quicke, Donald
    Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, BKK 10330, Thailand.
    Belokobylskij, Sergey
    Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St Petersburg, 199034, Russia; Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wilcza 64, Warszawa 00–679, Poland..
    Revision of the Oriental subgenus Patrisaspilota Fischer, 1995 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Alysiinae: Orthostigma Ratzeburg, 1844) with description of a new species from Papua New Guinea2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3, p. 365-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A revision of all Oriental species of subgenus Patrisaspilota Fischer, 1995 of the genus Orthostigma Ratzeburg, 1844 is provided and a new species from Papua New Guinea, Orthostigma (Patrisaspilota) enduwaense sp. nov., is described and illustrated. The species name Patrisaspilota memorandum Fischer, 1995 is synonymized with Orthostigma multicarinatum Tobias, 1990. A comprehensive key to the World Patrisaspilota species is presented and all known species are re-described and illustrated.

  • 40.
    Sohlenius, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rundmaskar viktig länk i markens näringsväv2019In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 20-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41. Iversen, Lars Lönnsman
    et al.
    Svensson, Erik I
    Christensen, Sören Thromsholdt
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sand-Jensen, Kaj
    Sexual conflict and intrasexual polymorphism promote assortative mating and halt population differentiation2019In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual conflict is thought to be an important evolutionary force in drivingphenotypic diversification, population divergence, and speciation. However,empirical evidence is inconsistent with the generality that sexual conflictenhances population divergence. Here, we demonstrate an alternativeevolutionary outcome in which sexual conflict plays a conservative role inmaintaining male and female polymorphisms locally, rather than promotingpopulation divergence. In diving beetles, female polymorphisms haveevolved in response to male mating harassment and sexual conflict. We presentthe first empirical evidence that this female polymorphism is associatedwith (i) two distinct and sympatric male morphological mating clusters(morphs) and (ii) assortative mating between male and female morphs.Changes in mating traits in one sex led to a predictable change in the othersex which leads to predictable within-population evolutionary dynamics inmale and female morph frequencies. Our results reveal that sexual conflictcan lead to assortative mating between male offence and female defencetraits, if a stable male and female mating polymorphisms are maintained.Stable male and female mating polymorphisms are an alternative outcometo an accelerating coevolutionary arms race driven by sexual conflict. Suchstable polymorphisms challenge the common view of sexual conflict as anengine of rapid speciation via exaggerated coevolution between sexes.

  • 42. Chapman, Abbie S.A.
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bates, Amanda E.
    sFDvent: A global trait database for deep‐sea hydrothermal‐vent fauna2019In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1538-1551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Haase, Martin
    et al.
    Höljte, Henriette
    Blahy, Beate
    Bridge, Damon
    Henne, Eberhard
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kaldma, Katrin
    Khudyakov, Ekaterina A
    King, Amy
    Leito, Aivar
    Mewes, Wolfgang
    Mudrik, Elena A.
    Ojaste, Ivar
    Politov, Dmitry V. 
    Popken, Ronald
    Rinne, Juhani
    Stanbury, Andrew
    Tofft, Jesper
    Väli, Ülo
    Schmitz Ornés, Angela
    Shallow genetic population structure in an expanding migratory bird with high breeding site fidelity, the Western Eurasian Crane Grus grus grus2019In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 160, p. 965-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than half a century, the Western Eurasian Crane (Grus grus grus) has been expanding its range toward western Europe, recolonizing areas where it had been previously driven to extinction, including the UK, the Netherlands and Denmark. The Western Eurasian Crane is, on the one hand, a very mobile, migratory species, but on the other, is territorial and shows high breeding site fidelity. Hence, its genetic population structure is subject to antagonizing forces, which have different consequences. Based on the genotyping of six highly variable microsatellite loci, we inferred the population structure of the Western Eurasian Crane from samples from eight regions. We integrated classic F-statistics including analyses of molecular variance with a priori designation of structure and divisive clustering approaches, i.e. a Bayesian procedure (STRU CTU RE) and discriminant analysis of principal components, which infer structure a posteriori. According to the F-statistics, populations were only weakly differentiated, and the majority of the genetic variance (> 90%) was attributed to individuals. At first glance, the divisive approaches appeared to agree in finding four clusters. Yet, there was no correspondence regarding the composition of the clusters and none of the results were biologically meaningful. However, STRU CTU RE delivered an alternative interpretation, designating the highest likelihood to a scenario without subdivision, in clear agreement with the findings based on the F-statistics. In conclusion, the Western Eurasian Crane is genetically largely homogeneous, probably as a consequence of the rapid growth and range expansion of its population.

  • 44. Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Species delimitation in the presence of strong incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization: lessons from Ophioderma(Ophiuroidea: Echinodermata)2019In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 131, p. 138-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45. Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    et al.
    Raveloson Ravaomanarivo, Lala Harivelo
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic revision of the genus Copelatus of Madagascar (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae):the non-erichsonii group species2019In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 869, p. 19-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Copelatus Erichson, 1832 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae) of Madagascar is revised intwo parts. This review is restricted to the Copelatus species that have fewer than ten elytral + one submarginalstria, including all species except those of the erichsonii species group. Both morphological andmolecular (mitochondrial COI) data are used in an integrative taxonomic approach. Thirteen speciesare recognised, of which five are described as new: Copelatus ankaratra sp. nov., Copelatus kely sp. nov.,Copelatus pseudostriatus sp. nov., Copelatus safiotra sp. nov. and Copelatus vokoka sp. nov. Copelatus unguicularisRégimbart, 1903 and Copelatus apicalis Fairmaire, 1898 are both transferred to the genus MadaglymbusShaverdo & Balke, 2008 (comb. nov.). Copelatus mimetes Guignot 1957 is a junior synonym ofthe widespread Afrotropical–Arabian Copelatus pulchellus (Klug, 1834) (syn. nov.). Copelatus marginipennis(Laporte, 1835) is reinstated (stat. nov.) as a valid species with Copelatus aldabricus Balfour-Browne,1950 and Copelatus aldabricus var. simplex Guignot, 1952 as junior synonyms (syn. nov.). We designatelectotypes for Colymbetes marginipennis Laporte, 1835 and Copelatus obtusus Boheman, 1848. Copelatusperidinus Guignot, 1955 is recorded for Madagascar for the first time and Copelatus nodieri Régimbart,1895 is rejected as a species present in Madagascar.

  • 46.
    Nyman, Tommi
    et al.
    Department of Ecosystems in the Barents Region, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Svanvik, Norway.
    Onstein, Renske
    Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Silvestro, Daniele
    German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle–Jena–Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Wutke, Saskia
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg and Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Sweden.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut Müncheberg, Germany.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Blank, Stephan
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut Müncheberg, Germany.
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The early wasp plucks the flower: disparate extant diversity of sawfly superfamilies (Hymenoptera:‘Symphyta’) may reflect asynchronous switching to angiosperm hosts2019In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The insect order Hymenoptera originated during the Permian nearly 300 Mya. Ancestrally herbivorous hymenopteran lineages today make up the paraphyletic suborder ‘Symphyta’, which encompasses c. 8200 species with very diverse host-plant associations. We use phylogeny-based statistical analyses to explore the drivers of diversity dynamics within the ‘Symphyta’, with a particular focus on the hypothesis that diversification of herbivorous insects has been driven by the explosive radiation of angiosperms during and after the Cretaceous. Our ancestral-state estimates reveal that the first symphytans fed on gymnosperms, and that shifts onto angiosperms and pteridophytes – and back – have occurred at different time intervals in different groups. Trait-dependent analyses indicate that average net diversification rates do not differ between symphytan lineages feeding on angiosperms, gymnosperms or pteridophytes, but trait-independent models show that the highest diversification rates are found in a few angiosperm-feeding lineages that may have been favoured by the radiations of their host taxa during the Cenozoic. Intriguingly, lineages-through-time plots show signs of an early Cretaceous mass extinction, with a recovery starting first in angiosperm-associated clades. Hence, the oft-invoked assumption of herbivore diversification driven by the rise of flowering plants may overlook a Cretaceous global turnover in insect herbivore communities during the rapid displacement of gymnosperm- and pteridophyte-dominated floras by angiosperms.

  • 47.
    Krainer, Liubomyr
    et al.
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Susulovsky, Andrij
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Reyes, Peña-Santiago
    Departamento de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Universidad de Jaén, Campus 'Las Gunillas', Avenida de Ben Saprut s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain.
    The genus Metaporcelaimus Lordello, 1965 (Nematoda, Dorylaimida, Aporcelaimidae) in Ukraine. Description of one new and one known species with granulate egg shell2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4560, no 1, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Ngirinshuti, Leonce
    et al.
    University of Rwanda.
    Rukera Tabaro, Simon
    University of Rwanda.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    The Trichoptera diversity of Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda,with description of a new species in the family Pisuliidae2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 576, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of nine families of Trichoptera were identified from material collected in Malaise andlight traps in the western part of Nyungwe National Park, southwestern Rwanda, late October 2018.Included in the material was an undescribed species of Pisuliidae which is described herein as Silvatareslaetae Ngirinshuti & Johanson sp. nov. The new species adds to the six Pisuliidae species previouslyrecorded for the East African region, five endemic to Tanzania and one to Uganda. This study portraysthe first results of an ongoing survey on the Trichoptera fauna of Rwanda.

  • 49.
    Prous, Marko
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
    Liston, Andrew
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Kramp, Katja
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Savina, Henri
    Parc Majorelle, 33 chemin du Ramelet-Moundi, bât. C, apt. 16, 31100 Toulouse, France.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taeger, Andreas
    The West Palaearctic genera of Nematinae (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 875, p. 63-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Keys to adults and larvae of the genera of West Palaearctic nematine sawflies are presented. Species of some of the smaller genera are keyed, and their taxonomy, distribution, and host plants reviewed, with a geographic focus on north-western Europe, particularly Sweden. Dinematus Lacourt, 2006 is a new junior subjective synonym of Pristiphora Latreille, 1810, resulting in the new combination Pristiphora krausi (Lacourt, 2006) for the type species of Dinematus. Hemichroa monticola Ermolenko, 1960 is a new junior subjective synonym of Hemichroa australis (Serville, 1823). Lectotypes are designated for Tenthredo opaca Fabricius, 1775, Mesoneura opaca var. nigerrima Enslin, 1914, Mesoneura opaca var. obscuriventris Enslin, 1914, Nematus hypogastricus Hartig, 1837, Nematus alnivorus Hartig, 1840, Leptopus rufipes Förster, 1854, Nematus protensus Förster, 1854, and Platycampus luridiventris var. pleuritica Enslin, 1915. A phylogenetic analysis based on four genes (mitochondrial COI and nuclear NaK, POL2, and TPI) supports the current generic classification.

  • 50.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The West Palaearctic Dineura species, focussing on Sweden (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4612, no 4, p. 501-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Dineura species are now considered to occur in the West Palaearctic, including northern Europe, but D. parcivalvis has not been found in Scandinavia. Dineura pullior Schmidt & Walter, 1995 is treated as a new junior subjective synonym of D. virididorsata (Retzius, 1783). An illustrated key to adults is presented. Lectotypes are designated for seven nominal taxa: Dineura stilata var. virilis Enslin, 1918, Dineura testaceipes var. nigriventris Enslin, 1915, Dineura virididorsata var. dorsalis Enslin, 1915, Nematus posticus Förster, 1854, Nematus xanthocerus Hartig, 1840, Nematus xanthopus Zaddach, 1876, and Tenthredo (Allantus) stilata Klug, 1816. Distributions in the Fennoscandian countries are outlined, with particular reference to Sweden.

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