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  • 1. Lee, Taekjun
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bae, Yeon Jae
    Shin, Sook
    A New Fissiparous Brittle Star, Ophiacantha scissionis sp. nov. (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Ophiacanthida), from Jeju Island, Korea2019In: Zoological Studies, ISSN 1021-5506, E-ISSN 1810-522X, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Fernandez, Diana E.
    et al.
    Giachetti, Luciana
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Thuy, Ben
    Perez, Damian E.
    Comerio, Marcos
    Pazos, Pablo J.
    Brittle stars from the Lower Cretaceous of Patagonia: first ophiuroid articulated remains for the Mesozoic of South America2019In: Andean Geology, ISSN 0718-7092, E-ISSN 0718-7106, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 421-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Campydoroides manautei gen. et sp. nov. from New Caledonia and reappraisal of suborder Campydorina (Nematoda)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, Vol. 518, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sven, Boström
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Descriptions of species of Acrobeles von Linstow, 1877 (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae) from Kelso Dunes, Mojave National Preserve, California, USA2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4651, p. 330-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Diversitet hos hakmaskar - tarmparasiter hos gråsälar i Östersjön2019In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6. Smythe, Ashleigh
    et al.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kocot, Kevin
    Improved phylogenomic sampling of free-living nematodes enhances resolution of higher-level nematode phylogeny2019In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ivković, Marija
    et al.
    University of Zagreb.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Previšić, Ana
    University of Zagreb.
    Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography provide insights into the subgeneric classification of Wiedemannia Zetterstedt (Diptera: Empididae: Clinocerinae)2019In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 44, p. 559-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subgenera of Wiedemannia are poorly defined and, as such, most recently described species are not assigned to a subgenus or have been assigned to a subgenus without explanation. In this study we perform a molecular phylogenetic analysis to elucidate relationships within the genus Wiedemannia. We sequenced two mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase c subunit I and cytochrome β) and two nuclear (carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary and elongation factor‐1α) gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among the subgenera ChamaedipsiaEucelidiaPhilolutraPseudowiedemanniaRoederella and Wiedemannia (s.s.) using both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood approaches. The genus was found to be monophyletic, but most of the subgenera were not. We propose eliminating the present subgeneric division altogether. Molecular dating using a log‐normal clock model and calibration with fossil species indicated that Wiedemannia diversified about 48 Ma, while there was still land connectivity between Europe and Asia with North America. Wiedemannia has a near‐worldwide distribution apart from the Australasian and Neotropical regions and Antarctica, with greatest species richness in the western Palaearctic, especially the Mediterranean region. Molecular phylogenetics support more recent morphological studies. The subgenera of Wiedemannia are invalid and rejected. Biogeographical data suggest potential hotspots, and the current distribution is discussed.

  • 8.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wayland, Matthew
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Morphological observations on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala, Polymorphidae)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, Vol. 514, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision and morphological analysis of the Ragadidae (Insecta, Diptera)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 0, no 521, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several taxonomic groups within Empidoidea Latreille, 1809 have been subject to unclear phylogenetic assignments along with multiple parallel hypotheses causing difficulties in classification and morphological identification. This study reviews the internal classification of the Ragadidae and includes a diagnosis and description of all included subfamilies and genera based on the results of an analysis of morphological characters using maximum parsimony. Illustration of important characters and a key to all genera in the family is given. The genus Hormopeza Zetterstedt, 1838 is found to be most closely related to Anthepiscopus Becker, 1891 and Iteaphila Zetterstedt, 1838, and the subfamily Iteaphilinae Wahlberg & Johanson, 2018 is therefore expanded to also include that genus. Hormopeza is consequently excluded from Ragadinae Sinclair, 2016. This study provides diagnoses, descriptions and keys in a contribution to a thorough classification of the empidoid groups and increased ease in morphological recognition.

  • 10. Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Species delimitation in the presence of strong incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization: lessons from Ophioderma(Ophiuroidea: Echinodermata)2019In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 131, p. 138-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Krainer, Liubomyr
    et al.
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Susulovsky, Andrij
    State Museum of Natural History, NASU, Theatralna str. 18, Lviv 79008, Ukraine.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Reyes, Peña-Santiago
    Departamento de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal y Ecologia, Universidad de Jaén, Campus 'Las Gunillas', Avenida de Ben Saprut s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain.
    The genus Metaporcelaimus Lordello, 1965 (Nematoda, Dorylaimida, Aporcelaimidae) in Ukraine. Description of one new and one known species with granulate egg shell2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4560, no 1, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rota, Jadranka
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Chazot, Nicolas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Peña, Carlos
    HipLead, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    A simple method for data partitioning based on relative evolutionary rates2018In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, p. 1-21, article id 6:e5498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Multiple studies have demonstrated that partitioning of molecular datasets is important in model-based phylogenetic analyses. Commonly, partitioning is done a priori based on some known properties of sequence evolution, e.g. differences in rate of evolution among codon positions of a protein-coding gene. Here we propose a new method for data partitioning based on relative evolutionary rates of the sites in the alignment of the dataset being analysed. The rates are inferred using the previously published Tree Independent Generation of Evolutionary Rates (TIGER), and the partitioning is conducted using our novel python script RatePartitions. We conducted simulations to assess the performance of our new method, and we applied it to eight published multi-locus phylogenetic datasets, representing different taxonomic ranks within the insect order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) and one phylogenomic dataset, which included ultra-conserved elements as well as introns.

    Methods. We used TIGER-rates to generate relative evolutionary rates for all sites in the alignments. Then, using RatePartitions, we partitioned the data into partitions based on their relative evolutionary rate. RatePartitions applies a simple formula that ensures a distribution of sites into partitions following the distribution of rates of the characters from the full dataset. This ensures that the invariable sites are placed in a partition with slowly evolving sites, avoiding the pitfalls of previously used methods, such as kmeans. Different partitioning strategies were evaluated using BIC scores as calculated by PartitionFinder.

    Results. Simulations did not highlight any misbehaviour of our partitioning approach, even under difficult parameter conditions or missing data. In all eight phylogenetic datasets, partitioning using TIGER-rates and RatePartitions was significantly better as measured by the BIC scores than other partitioning strategies, such as the commonly used partitioning by gene and codon position. We compared the resulting topologies and node support for these eight datasets as well as for the phylogenomic dataset.

    Discussion. We developed a new method of partitioning phylogenetic datasets without using any prior knowledge (e.g. DNA sequence evolution). This method is entirely based on the properties of the data being analysed and can be applied to DNA sequences (protein-coding, introns, ultra-conserved elements), protein sequences, as well as morphological characters. A likely explanation for why our method performs better than other tested partitioning strategies is that it accounts for the heterogeneity in the data to a much greater extent than when data are simply subdivided based on prior knowledge.

  • 13.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bjelke, Ulf
    Bergsten, J. & Bjelke U. 2018. Digital illustrerad bestämningsnyckel till Sveriges skräddare. I: Artnyckeln. ArtDatabanken, SLU, Uppsala. https://www.artnyckeln.se/type/gerridae-2000939-fullvuxna-skraddare.2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Leasi, Francesca
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Biology, Geology and Environmental Science, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga,.
    Sevigny, Joseph
    Hubbard Center for Genome Studies, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire.
    Laflamme, Eric
    Department of Mathematics, Plymouth State University.
    Artois, Tom
    Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University.
    Curini-Galletti, Marco
    Dipartimento di Medicina Veterinaria, University of Sassari,.
    Navarrete, Alberto
    Departmento de Sistemática y Ecología Acuática, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Unidad Chetumal.
    Di Domenico, Maikon
    Centro de Estudos do Mar, Universidade Federal do Paraná.
    Goetz, Freya
    Department of Invertebrate Zoology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
    Hall, Jeffrey
    Hubbard Center for Genome Studies, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire.
    Hochberg, Rick
    Department of Biological Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell.
    Jörger, Katharina
    Department of Biology, Ludwig-Maximilians–University of Munich.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, Antonio
    Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia.
    Wirshing, Herman
    Department of Invertebrate Zoology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
    Norenburg, Jonathan
    Department of Invertebrate Zoology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
    Thomas, Kelley
    Hubbard Center for Genome Studies, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire.
    Biodiversity estimates and ecological interpretations of meiofaunal communities are biased by the taxonomic approach2018In: Communications Biology, ISSN ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Martin-Duran, José
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Pang, Kevin
    University of Bergen.
    Børve, Aina
    University of Bergen.
    Semmler, Henrike
    Natural History Museum of Denmark.
    Furu, Anlaug
    University of Bergen.
    Cannon, Johanna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hejnol, Andreas
    University of Bergen.
    Convergent evolution of bilaterian nerve cords2018In: Nature, ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 553, article id 25030Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of Drilocephalobus moldavicus Lisetskaya,1968 (Rhabditida: Osstellidae) from Kelso Dunes, Mojave National Reserve, California,USA2018In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4514, no 3, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Désamorè, Aurélie
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Laenen, Benjamin
    Miller, Kelly
    University of New Mexico.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Early burst in body size evolution is uncoupled from species diversification in diving beetles (Dytiscidae)2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in morphology are often thought to be linked to changes in species diversification,

    which is expected to leave a signal of early burst (EB) in phenotypic traits.

    However, such signal is rarely recovered in empirical phylogenies, even for groups

    with well-known adaptive radiation. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach

    in Dytiscidae, which harbours ~4,300 species with as much as 50-fold variation in

    body size among them, we ask whether pattern of species diversification correlates

    with morphological evolution. Additionally, we test whether the large variation in

    body size is linked to habitat preference and whether the latter influences species

    turnover. We found, in sharp contrast to most animal groups, that Dytiscidae body

    size evolution follows an early-burst model with subsequent high phylogenetic conservatism.

    However, we found no evidence for associated shifts in species diversification,

    which point to an uncoupled evolution of morphology and species

    diversification. We recovered the ancestral habitat of Dytiscidae as lentic (standing

    water), with many transitions to lotic habitat (running water) that are concomitant

    to a decrease in body size. Finally, we found no evidence for difference in net diversification

    rates between habitats nor difference in turnover in lentic and lotic species.

    This result, together with recent findings in dragonflies, contrasts with some

    theoretical expectations of the habitat stability hypothesis. Thus, a thorough

    reassessment of the impact of dispersal, gene flow and range size on the speciation

    process is needed to fully encompass the evolutionary consequences of the lentic–

    lotic divide for freshwater fauna.

  • 18.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Feeding Ecology in Oligocene Mylodontoid Sloths (Mammalia,Xenarthra) as Revealed by Orthodentine Microwear Analysis2018In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 551-564-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, dental microwear analysis has been successfully employed to xenarthran teeth. Here, we present new data on use wear features on 16 molariforms of Orophodon hapaloides and Octodontotherium grande. These taxa count among the earliest sloths and are known from the Deseadan SALMA (late Oligocene). Modern phylogenetic analyses classify Octodontotherium and Orophodon within Mylodontoidea with whom they share lobate cheek teeth with an outer layer of cementum and a thick layer of orthodentine. Similar target areas of 100 μm2 were analyzed on the orthodentine surface of each tooth by stereomicroscopic microwear and by SEM microwear. Results were unlike those of extant sloths (stereomicroscopic microwear: Bradypus, Choloepus) and published data from fossil sloths (SEM microwear: Acratocnus, Megalonyx, Megatherium, Thinobadistes); thus, both approaches independently indicate a different feeding ecology for the Oligocene taxa. The unique microwear results suggest that both taxa fed on plant material with low to moderate intrinsic toughness (foliage, twigs) but also proposes intake of tougher food items (e.g., seeds). Frequent gouging of the tooth surfaces can be explained by exogenous influence on microwear, such as possible intake of abrasive grit. We suggest an unspecialized herbivorous diet for Octodontotherium and Orophodon utilizing diverse food resources of their habitat. These interpretations support the reconstruction of (1) Deseadan environments as open habitats with spreading savannas/grasslands and (2) both taxa as wide muzzled bulk feeders at ground level.

  • 19.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hovmöller, Rasmus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gallstekeln- en mästerlig manipulatör2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan en liten insekt manipulera ett stort träd till att bygga ett hus

    fyllt med mat till sin avkomma? Den gåtan finns ännu inget svar på. Men

    genom att studera gallsteklar kan man i alla fall börja få förståelse för dessa

    mästerliga manipulatörers spännande liv.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-01 11:54
  • 20.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rahman, MD. Mizanur
    University of Dhaka.
    Mollah, Abdur Rob
    University of Dhaka.
    Laubuka tenella, a new species of cyprinid fish from southeastern Bangladesh and southwestern Myanmar (Teleostei, Cyprinidae, Danioninae)2018In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 742, p. 105-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laubuka tenella is a new species characterized by the colour pattern, consisting of short dark verticalbars anteriorly on the side, and a dark lateral band posteriorly on the side, combined with a relativelyshort pelvic fin and 29–30 lateral-line scales. It is separated from other   analysed by minimum9 % uncorrected p-distance in the mitochondrial COI gene. The type series is composed of specimens from small streams in the Cox’s Bazar District in Bangladesh (the type locality), and the Thandwe River drainage in western Myanmar. Laubuka brahmaputraensis is strongly indicated to be a junior synonymof L. laubuca, the second known species of Laubuka in Bangladesh. Eustira ceylonensis, currently in thes ynonymy of Devario malabaricus, is a valid species of Laubuka.

  • 21.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nylander, Johan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis
    Life history of Parnips and the evolutionary origin of gall wasps2018In: Journal of Hymenoptera Research, ISSN 0219-8916, E-ISSN 1843-5610, Vol. 65, p. 91-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By mechanisms that are still unknown, gall wasps (Cynipidae) induce plants to form complex galls, inside which their larvae develop. The family also includes inquilines (phytophagous forms that live inside the galls of other gall inducers) and possibly also parasitoids of gall inducers. The origin of cynipids is shrouded in mystery, but it has been clear for some time that a key group in making progress on this question is the ‘figitoid inquilines’. They are gall-associated relatives of cynipids, whose biology is poorly known. Here, we report the first detailed data on the life history of a figitoid inquiline, the genus Parnips. Dissections of mature galls show that Parnips nigripes is a parasitoid of Barbotinia oraniensis, a cynipid that induces single-chambered galls inside the seed capsules of annual poppies (Papaver rhoeas and P. dubium). Galls with pupae of Parnips nigripes always contain the remains of a terminal-instar larva of B. oraniensis. The mandibles of the terminal-instar larva of P. nigripes are small and equipped with a single sharp tooth, a shape that is characteristic of carnivorous larvae. The weight of P. nigripes pupae closely match that of the same sex of B. oraniensis pupae, indicating that Parnips makes efficient use of its host and suggesting that ovipositing Parnips females lay eggs that match the sex of the host larva. Dissection of young galls show that another species of Parnips, hitherto undescribed, spends its late larval life as an ectoparasitoid of Iraella hispanica, a cynipid that induces galls in flowers of annual poppies. These and other observations suggest that Parnips shares the early endoparasitic-late ectoparasitic life history described for all other cynipoid parasitoids. Our findings imply that gall wasps evolved from parasitoids of gall insects. The original hosts could not have been cynipids but possibly chalcidoids, which appear to be the hosts of several extant figitoid inquilines. It is still unclear whether the gall inducers evolved rapidly from these ancestral parasitoids, or whether they were preceded by a long series of intermediate forms that were phytophagous inquilines.

  • 22.
    Szpryngiel, Scarlett
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Riksantikvarieämbetet.
    Långsprötad silverfisk i museer, bibliotek och arkiv i Sverige2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns flera syften med denna rapport. Ett är att klargöra utbredningen av långsprötad silverfisk i Sverige, i såväl privatbostäder som i museer, arkiv och bibliotek. Den långsprötade silverfiskens biologi redogörs det också för i detalj utifrån befintlig litteratur. Dels för att synliggöra potentiella angreppspunkter för framtida bekämpningsåtgärder, dels för att utforma en biologiskt understödd riskbedömning för verksamheter som arbetar med samlingar och arkiv. Väldigt knapphändig information har tidigare funnits för beskrivning av typiska silverfiskskador i samlingar och arkiv. Dokumentationen i denna rapport bidrar därför till en ökad förståelse kring hur svårupptäckta skadorna kan vara och synliggör potentiella risker med att angrepp lämnas utan åtgärd. Ytterligare frågeställningar som berörs gäller artens fenologi i Sverige, dess fortsatta spridning samt skadepotential.

  • 23.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Microstomum (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomorpha, Microstomidae) from the Swedish west coast: two new species and a population description2018In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, no 398, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Molecular phylogenetics reveals novel relationships within Empidoidea (Diptera)2018In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 43, p. 619-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empidoidea represent a large and diverse superfamily of true flies, and to date no stable hypothesis on the phylogeny exists. Previous classifications have been based on morphological data and the relationships among several groups are still unknown. Using the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) and cytochrome β (Cytβ) and the nuclear genes carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary (CAD), elongation factor‐1α (EF‐1α) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in a Bayesian analysis, we tested the support of higher taxonomic groups within this large superfamily of flies. We re‐evaluated previous hypotheses of evolution within the group and present a highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis. Atelestidae, Dolichopodidae, Empididae and Hybotidae were supported as monophyletic families, with Atelestidae as sister group to the remaining Empidoidea. Within the family Hybotidae, Bicellariinae stat.n. formed the sister group to the other subfamilies. The family Ragadidae stat.n. is established to include the subfamily Ragadinae and the new subfamily Iteaphilinae subfam.n.; Ragadidae was sister group to the Empididae. Dolichopodidae was found to form a sister group to Ragadidae plus Empididae. Within Empididae, Hemerodromiinae was found to be a nonmonophyletic group. The tribes Hilarini and Hemerodromiini stat. rev. were recovered as sister groups, as were Empidini and Chelipodini stat. rev. The former family Brachystomatidae was found to be nested within Empididae. A revised classification and diagnoses of nondolichopodid families, subfamilies and tribes are provided.

  • 25. O'Hara, Timothy
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hugall, Andrew
    Thuy, Ben
    Martynov, Alexander
    Morphological diagnoses of higher taxa in Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata) in support of a new classification2018In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 416, p. 1-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Zhang, Miles
    Sharanowski, Barbara
    Hope Meyer, Jacqueline
    Multilocus phylogeny of the parasitic wasps in the tribe Euphorini (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) with revised generic classifications2018In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, article id 6:e4783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Parasitic wasps in the family Braconidae are important regulators of

    insect pests, particularly in forest and agroecosystems. Within Braconidae, wasps in the

    tribe Euphorini (Euphorinae) attack economically damaging plant bugs (Miridae) that

    are major pests of field and vegetable crops. However, the evolutionary relationships

    of this tribe have been historically problematic. Most generic concepts have been

    based on ambiguous morphological characters which often leads to misidentification,

    complicating their use in biological control.

    Methods. Using a combination of three genes (COI, 28S, and CAD) and 80 taxa

    collected worldwide, we conducted Bayesian inference using MrBayes, and maximum

    likelihood analyses using RAxML and IQ-Tree on individual gene trees as well as the

    concatenated dataset.

    Results. The monophyly of the tribe Euphorini and the two genera Peristenus and

    Leiophron were confirmed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. The subgeneric

    classifications of Leiophron sensu lato were not supported, and the monotypic

    genus Mama was also not supported.

    Discussion. Euphoriella, Euphoriana, Euphorus, and Mama syn. n, have been synonymized

    under Leiophron. Mama mariae syn. n was placed as a junior synonym of

    Leiophron reclinator. The generic concepts of Peristenus and Leiophron were refined to

    reflect the updated phylogeny. Further we discuss the need for revising Euphorini given

    the number of undescribed species within the tribe.

  • 27.
    Norén, Michael
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nydén, Thomas
    Emåförbundet.
    Johansson, Peter
    Emåförbundet.
    Multiple origins of stone loach, Barbatula barbatula (Teleostei: Nemacheilidae), in Sweden based on mitochondrial DNA2018In: Journal of Applied Ichthyology, ISSN 0175-8659, E-ISSN 1439-0426, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stone loach, Barbatula barbatula, occurs in scattered localities in Sweden. Some of thepopulations have usually been considered as feral descendants of escaped 18thCentury pond stock, but historical documentation is inconclusive. Using the mitochondrialCOI gene as a marker, we analyzed specimens from seven Swedish localities. Oneof the middle Swedish localities, in Stockholm, belongs to a haplotype found also inPoland and Lithuania. Two other samples, from near Nyköping and Lake Hjälmaren,belong to a haplotype found in northeastern Europe (Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Volgabasin in Russia). Those two Swedish populations are probably descendants from atleast two introductions, probably for pond rearing for human consumption. Samplesfrom Skåne and Halland in southern Sweden belong to the haplotype found inDenmark, northern Germany and Poland; and whereas it remains possible that theyalso represent feral populations, they may be naturally occurring, having reachedSweden during the Ancylus period, about 8,000–10,000 years ago. A recently discoveredpopulation from the central South Swedish Highlands belongs to a mainly southeastern European haplotype. It probably represents a release of imported aquariumspecimens or live bait carried by sport fishing tourists.

  • 28.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Neodiplopeltula gen. nov. from the west coast of Sweden and reappraisal of the genus Diplopeltula Gerlach, 1950 (Nematoda, Diplopeltidae)2018In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 458, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Prous, Marko
    New and poorly-known sawflies (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinoidea) from Sweden, with taxonomic notes on Palaearctic Heptamelus species described by Swedish authors.2018In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 139, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    First records from Sweden of eight sawfly taxa are presented: Arge annulata Konow, 1891

    (Argidae), Allantus cingillipes (Kontuniemi, 1947), Allantus melanarius (Klug, 1818),

    Apethymus cereus (Klug, 1818), Dolerus liogaster schneideri Kiaer, 1898, Fenusella hortulana

    (Klug, 1818), Monophadnus spinolae (Klug, 1816), and Tenthredo mandibularis

    Fabricius, 1804 (Tenthredinidae). The problematic taxonomic status of Arge annulata is

    discussed, and it is recorded for the first time from Germany and Estonia. For Heptamelus

    dahlbomi (Thomson, 1870) (Heptamelidae): a lectotype is designated for Caenoneura

    dahlbomi, H. ussuriensis Malaise, 1931 is placed as its junior synonym, Athyrium distentifolium

    recorded as a new host, and additional distribution data are presented, including the

    first records from Austria. A lectotype is designated for Heptamelus magnocularis Malaise,

    1931, and this species briefly compared with H. dahlbomi.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-22 09:07
  • 30. Peyghan, Soroor
    et al.
    Doustshenas, Babak
    Navi, Mohammad Bagher
    Rounagh, Mohammad Taghi
    Larki, Amir Ashtari
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New records of the brittle stars Ophiothela venusta and Ophiactis modesta(Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) from the northern Persian Gulf,with morphological details2018In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4527, no 3, p. 425-435Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Isaia, Marco
    et al.
    Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Italy.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Francesco, Ballarin
    Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P. R. China.
    Chiarle, Alberto
    Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, Italy.
    On the morphological separation of two sibling species: Pardosa proxima (P. vlijmi syn. nov.) and P. tenuipes (Araneae: Lycosidae)2018In: Arachnologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 1018-4171, ISSN ISSN 1018-4171, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 6-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Martin, Irestedt
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships of rollers (Coraciidae) based on complete mitochondrial genomesand fifteen nuclear genes2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 126, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Sundberg, Henrik
    et al.
    Kruys, Åsa
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Position specificity in the genus Coreomyces (Laboulbeniomycetes, Ascomycota)2018In: Fungal Systematics and Evolution, ISSN 2589-3823, Vol. 1, p. 217-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study position specificity in the insect-parasitic fungal genus Coreomyces (Laboulbeniaceae, Laboulbeniales),

    we sampled corixid hosts (Corixidae, Heteroptera) in southern Scandinavia. We detected Coreomyces thalli in five different

    positions on the hosts. Thalli from the various positions grouped in four distinct clusters in the resulting gene trees, distinctly

    so in the ITS and LSU of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, less so in the SSU of the nuclear ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial

    ribosomal DNA. Thalli from the left side of abdomen grouped in a single cluster, and so did thalli from the ventral right side.

    Thalli in the mid-ventral position turned out to be a mix of three clades, while thalli growing dorsally grouped with thalli from

    the left and right abdominal clades. The mid-ventral and dorsal positions were found in male hosts only. The position on the left

    hemelytron was shared by members from two sister clades. Statistical analyses demonstrate a significant positive correlation

    between clade and position on the host, but also a weak correlation between host sex and clade membership. These results

    indicate that sex-of-host specificity may be a non-existent extreme in a continuum, where instead weak preferences for one

    host sex may turn out to be frequent.

  • 34.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nylinder, Stephan
    Ohlson, Jan I.
    Tietze, Dieter Thomas
    Reconstruction of the Late Miocene Biogeographic History of Tits and Chickadees (Aves: Passeriformes: Paridae) – a Comparison between Discrete Area Analyses and ProbabilisticDiffusion Approach2018In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 45, p. 14-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Malm, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    St Laurent, Ryan
    McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Florida Museum of Natural History, USA.
    McCabe, Timothy
    Dept. of Entomology, New York State Museum, USA.
    Revision of the genus Aleyda Schaus, 1928 with the description of one new species(Lepidoptera: Mimallonidae)2018In: SHILAP Revista de Lepidopterología, ISSN 0300-5267, E-ISSN 2340-4078, Vol. 46, no 181, p. 157-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Aleyda Schaus, 1928 is revised. The male of the type species of Aleyda, A. accipiter, is redescribed,and the female is figured for the first time. Aleyda heppneri St Laurent, McCabe & Malm, sp. n. from Panamá andFrench Guiana is newly described. Male and female genitalia of both species are figured for the first time.

  • 36. van der Valk, Tom
    et al.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Caillaud, Damien
    Ngobobo, Urbain
    Binyinyi, Escobar
    Nishuli, Radar
    Stoinski, Tara
    Gilissen, Emmanuel
    Sonet, Gontran
    Semal, Patrick
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dalén, Love
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Significant loss of mitochondrial diversity within the last century due to extinction of peripheral populations in eastern gorillas2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    The enigmatic Betadevario ramachandrani (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae): phylogenetic position resolved by mitogenome analysis, with remarks on the prevalence of chimeric mitogenomes in GenBank2018In: Cogent Biology, ISSN 2331-2025, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nordlander, Göran
    The identity of figitid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea: Figitidae) of anthomyiid flies in conifer cones2018In: European Journal of Entomology, ISSN 1210-5759, E-ISSN 1802-8829, Vol. 115, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Larvae of Strobilomyia flies (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) are serious pests in conifer-seed orchards because they feed on the seed inside the cones. Figitid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea) of Strobilomyia larvae in conifer cones are commonly reported but under various generic names. It is argued here that, across the entire Holarctic region, these figitids belong to Amphithectus and perhaps also to Sarothrus (Figitinae), but not to Melanips (Aspicerinae), contrary to some reports. We conclude that the identity of the commonly found figitid associated with conifer cones (Larix and Picea) in Europe and Asia is Amphithectus austriacus (Tavares, 1928) comb. n. This is most likely considering the original description and the host association, although the type specimen of Seitneria austriaca Tavares, 1928 is lost. This species name takes priority over the recently described Amphithectus coriaceus Paretas-Martinez & Pujade-Villar, 2013. Seitneria Tavares, 1928 becomes a new junior synonym of Amphithectus Hartig, 1840, and Amphithectus coriaceus Paretas-Martinez & Pujade-Villar, 2013 becomes a new synonym of Amphithectus austriacus (Tavares, 1928) comb. n.

  • 39.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rahman, MD. Mizanur
    University of Dhaka.
    Mollah, Abdur Rob
    University of Dhaka.
    The identity of Osteobrama cotio and the status of "Osteobrama serrata" (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Cyprininae)2018In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4504, no 1, p. 105-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteobrama cotio is considered to be a widespread species in India and Bangladesh. Mitochondrial DNA (COI, 16S rRNA)shows that populations from the Meghna River, Karnafuli and Sangu Rivers, Narmada River, and Godavari River aregenetically distinct from each other. No morphological differences were found to separate Meghna and Karnafuli+Sangu populations, however. A putative new species, “Osteobrama serrata” has been described from the Barak River basin, statedto be distinguished from O. cotio by the presence of a serrated third dorsal-fin ray. The description of “O. serrata” doesnot fulfil requirements of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, (International Commission on ZoologicalNomenclature 1999) and the name is thus unavailable. Published DNA sequences of “Osteobrama serrata” are identicalto sequences of O. cotio from Bangladesh. As mentioned already in the original description, O. cotio has a serrated third dorsal-fin ray.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G.P.
    Blom, Mozes
    Irestedt, Martin
    The phylogenetic position of the extinct Cuban Macaw Ara tricolor based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences2018In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 160, p. 666-672Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Thuy, Ben
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Unravelling the origin of the basket stars and their allies (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Euryalida).2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 8493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Euryalids, which include the spectacular basket stars, form a morphologically aberrant group of brittle stars. Surprisingly, the most recent molecular work found them to be sister to ophiurid brittle stars, thus challenging the traditional dichotomy between euryalids and non-euryalids, and leaving an enormous ghost lineage of more than 100 million years between the oldest unambiguous euryalid fossils and their predicted divergence from ophiurids during the Triassic. Here we examine both previously known and newly collected fossils to explore the evolutionary history of euryalids. A morphology-based phylogenetic estimate confirms the Triassic Aspiduriella as a basal member of the euryalid clade that superficially resembles members of the living ophiurid sister clades. Furthermore, we use lateral arm plates and vertebrae to identify two new Jurassic ophiuroids, Melusinaster alissawhitegluzae and Melusinaster arcusinimicus, as early euryalids that are morphologically intermediate between Aspiduriella and extant euryalids. Our phylogenetic analysis is the first to combine data from completely preserved skeletons and from microfossils in order to bridge morphological and stratigraphical gaps between the sampled taxa. It fills a major gap in the fossil record of euryalids and sets a robust phylogenetic framework to understand the morphological transition from ophiurid-like ancestors to the typical modern euryalids better.

  • 42.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vargspindlar2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 17-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43. Bjelke, Ulf
    et al.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vattenytans mästare2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 2018, no 3, p. 9-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wide distributions and cryptic diversity within a Microstomum (Platyhelminthes) species complex2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomum lineare is a common species of fresh and brackish waters found world-wide. Three genes (18S, CO1 and ITS) were sequenced from specimens of M. lineare collected from four countries, and the levels of cryptic diversity and genetic structuring were assessed. Results showed M. lineare has very wide haplotype distributions suggesting higher than expected dispersal capabilities. In addition, three new species were described on the basis of molecular taxonomy: Microstomum artoisi sp. nov., Microstomum tchaikovskyi sp. nov. and Microstomum zicklerorum sp. nov.

  • 45.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    A genomic perspective of the pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea suggests a long history of low effective population size2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 16853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the possibly extinct pink-headed duck Rhodonessa caryophyllacea unambiguously shows that it belongs to the pochard radiation that also includes the genera Aythya and Netta. It is the sister to all modern-day pochards and belongs to a lineage that branched off from the others more than 2.8 million years ago. Rhodonessa caryophyllacea is believed to never have been common in modern time and we show this has probably been the situation for as long as 100,000 years. Our results suggest that their effective population size varied between 15,000 and 25,000 individuals during the last 150,000 years of the Pleistocene. The reasons behind this are largely unknown as very little is known about the life-history and biology of this species. Presumably it is due to factors related to feeding or to breeding, but we may never know this for sure.

  • 46.
    Balke, Michael
    et al.
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hendrich, Lars
    Zoologische Staatssammlung München.
    A new genus and two new species of Southeast Asian Bidessini as well as new synonyms for Oceanian species (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 647, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rompindessus jenisi Balke, Bergsten & Hendrich, gen. n. et sp. n. is described from near Rompin village in West Malaysia. The new genus is characterized by the presence of an occipital line and basal pronotal striae, the presence of a thick anterior bead on clypeus and two-segmented parameres as well as by the absence of basal elytral striae, the absence of sutural line on elytron, the absence of basal epipleural transverse carina, and the absence of longitudinal elytral carina. Moreover, male pro- and mesotarsus appear stout, and distinctly dilated laterally; the pronotum is comparably long and parallel-sided and the colour of beetle conspicuous dark orange. Leiodytes kualalipis Balke, Wang, Bergsten & Hendrich, sp. n. is described from West Malaysia (Pahang) and South Vietnam (Cat Tien). It is well characterized by its large size, elongate body and the form of the median lobe. Limbodessus fijiensis (J. Balfour-Browne, 1944), comb. n. described from Fiji is a new synonym of Limbodessus curviplicatus (Zimmermann, 1927) described from Samoa.

  • 47.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    A new species of Aspidiophorus (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae) from the Swedish west coast2017In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4290, no 2, p. 390-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Warén, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Valdés, Angel
    Gosliner, Terrence M.
    A new species of Parvaplustrum Powell, 1951 (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia, Aplustridae, from the northeastern Pacific.2017In: The Nautilus, ISSN 0028-1344, Vol. 131, p. 97-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kirk, James, J.
    A new species of Redudasys (Gastrotricha: Macrodasyida: Redudasyidae)from the United States2017In: Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, ISSN 0006-324X, E-ISSN 1943-6327, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 128-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Redudasys (Macrodasyida: Redudasyidae) isdescribed from Texas and Oregon, U.S.A. A single Texas specimen wasreported (but not formally described and named) in 2014 from an artesianoutflow in Spring Lake, San Marcos, Texas. The Texas specimen provided thefirst record of Redudasys from outside Brazil. Fifteen specimens were foundand studied in 2015 and 2016 from sand pockets among boulders in the LittleNestucca River, near Pacific City, Oregon. Redudasys neotemperatus n. sp. ismorphologically and genetically distinguishable from Redudasys forneriseKisielewski, 1987a, the only formally described species in the genus up untilnow, and morphologically distinguishable from ‘‘Redudasys sp.’’, an unnamedform reported by Garraffoni et al. in 2010 without genetic information. TheTexas and Oregon specimens agree well morphologically and genetically.

  • 50. Haszprunar, Gerhard
    et al.
    Kunze, Thomas
    Warén, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Heß, Martin
    A reconsideration of epipodial and cephalic appendages in basal hastropods: homologies, modules and evolutionary scenarios.2017In: Journal of molluscan studies, ISSN 0260-1230, E-ISSN 1464-3766, Vol. 83, p. 363-383Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 367
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