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  • 1.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Crocetta, Fabio
    Department of Integrative Marine Ecology (EMI), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Tenorio, Manuel J.
    Departamento CMIM y Q. Inorgánica-INBIO, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    D'Aniello, Salvatore
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms (BEOM), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Fassio, Giulia
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Rodríguez-Flores, Paula C.
    Museum of Comparative Zoology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Uribe, Juan E.
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Afonso, Carlos M.L.
    Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005 - 139 Faro, Portugal.
    Oliverio, Marco
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Hidden species diversity and mito-nuclear discordance within the Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 186, p. 107838-107838, article id 107838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus, is currently considered a single species inhabiting the whole Mediterranean basin and the adjacent Atlantic coasts. Yet, no population genetic study has assessed its taxonomic status. Here, we collected 245 individuals from 75 localities throughout the Mediterranean Sea and used cox1 barcodes, complete mitochondrial genomes, and genome skims to test whether L. ventricosus represents a complex of cryptic species. The maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial genomes recovered six main clades (hereby named blue, brown, green, orange, red, and violet) with sufficient sequence divergence to be considered putative species. On the other hand, phylogenomic analyses based on 437 nuclear genes only recovered four out of the six clades: blue and orange clades were thoroughly mixed and the brown one was not recovered. This mito-nuclear discordance revealed instances of incomplete lineage sorting and introgression, and may have caused important differences in the dating of main cladogenetic events. Species delimitation tests proposed the existence of at least three species: green, violet, and red + blue + orange (i.e., cyan). Green plus cyan (with sympatric distributions) and violet, had West and East Mediterranean distributions, respectively, mostly separated by the Siculo-Tunisian biogeographical barrier. Morphometric analyses of the shell using species hypotheses as factor and shell length as covariate showed that the discrimination power of the studied parameters was only 70.2%, reinforcing the cryptic nature of the uncovered species, and the importance of integrative taxonomic approaches considering morphology, ecology, biogeography, and mitochondrial and nuclear population genetic variation.

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  • 2.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dutertre, Sébastien
    IBMM, Université de Montpellier CNRS.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales.
    A Combined Transcriptomics and Proteomics Approach Reveals the Differences in the Predatory and Defensive Venoms of the Molluscivorous Cone Snail Cylinder ammiralis (Caenogastropoda: Conidae)2021In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 642-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venoms are complex mixtures of proteins that have evolved repeatedly in the animal kingdom. Cone snail venoms represent one of the best studied venom systems. In nature, this venom can be dynamically adjusted depending on its final purpose, whether to deter predators or hunt prey. Here, the transcriptome of the venom gland and the proteomes of the predation-evoked and defensive venoms of the molluscivorous cone snail Cylinder ammiralis were catalogued. A total of 242 venom-related transcripts were annotated. The conotoxin superfamilies presenting more different peptides were O1, O2, T, and M, which also showed high expression levels (except T). The three precursors of the J superfamily were also highly expressed. The predation-evoked and defensive venoms showed a markedly distinct profile. A total of 217 different peptides were identified, with half of them being unique to one venom. A total of 59 peptides ascribed to 23 different protein families were found to be exclusive to the predatory venom, including the cono-insulin, which was, for the first time, identified in an injected venom. A total of 43 peptides from 20 protein families were exclusive to the defensive venom. Finally, comparisons of the relative abundance (in terms of number of peptides) of the different conotoxin precursor superfamilies showed that most of them present similar abundance regardless of the diet.

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  • 3. Agustí, J.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Influence of climate on faunal evolution in the Quaternary of Europe1995Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Adedidran, Funmilola
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A draft transcriptome of a parasite Neocamacolaimus parasiticus (Camacolaimidae, Plectida)2021In: Journal of Nematology, E-ISSN 0022-300X, article id e2021Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision of the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae)2020In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 702, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on the genus Cobbionema Filipjev, 1922 in Sweden with the description of four species and a revision of the genus. Cobbionema acrocerca Filipjev, 1922 is relatively small in size, with a tail that has a conical proximal and a digitate distal section. Cobbionema cylindrolaimoides Schuurmans Stekhoven, 1950 is similar to C. acrocerca in most characters except having a larger body size and heavily cuticularized mandibles. Cobbionema brevispicula sp. nov. is characterised by short spicules and a conoid tail. Cobbionema acuminata sp. nov. is characterised by a long two-part spicule, a conical tail and three (one mid dorsal and two ventrosublateral) sharply pointed tines in the anterior chamber of the stoma that are located more anterior than in all the other species. We also present a molecular phylogeny of the family based on the nearly full-length 18S and the D2-D3 expansion segment of the 28S rRNA genes. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian trees inferred from both genes strongly support a clade that included Cobbionema, Demonema Cobb, 1894 and Halichoanolaimus de Man, 1888 and another clade with Gammanema Cobb, 1920 and Latronema Wieser, 1954 nested together. None of the trees supported the monophyly of the subfamilies Choniolaiminae and Selachinematinae.

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  • 6.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of a new marine predatory nematode Latronema dyngi sp. nov. (Nematoda, Chromadorida, Selachinematidae) from the west coast of Sweden and an updated phylogeny of Chromadoria2020In: Marine Biodiversity, ISSN 1867-1616, E-ISSN 1867-1624, Vol. 50, no 113, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new nematode species, Latronema dyngi sp. nov., is described from Skagerrak off the west coast of Sweden with the type locality near Dyngö island. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. is characterized by multispiral amphideal fovea with circular outline, 0.2– 0.3 corresponding body diameters wide in males and 0.1–0.2 corresponding body diameters wide in females, 12 cuticular longitudinal ridges and 18–27 precloacal supplements in males. Latronema dyngi sp. nov. most closely resembles L. orcinum in terms of body length; demanian ratios a, b, c and c′; number of amphid turns in males; and the ratio of spicule length to cloacal body diameter. The two species can be differentiated by the number longitudinal ridges on the cuticle (12 for Latronema dyngi sp. nov. vs 20–22 for L. orcinum) and spicule length (65–78 μm for L. dyngi vs 60 for L. orcinum) and shape (weakly arcuate for L. dyngi sp. nov. vs strongly arcuate for L. orcinum). We also performed a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis on over 250 nematodes of the subclass Chromadoria based on their nearly full-length 18S rDNA sequences. In agreement with previous studies, our analysis supported Selachinematidae as a monophyletic group and placed Richtersia Steiner, 1916 within Desmodoridae Filipjev, 1922 or just outside of the main Desmodorida clade with the latter placement not well supported.

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  • 7.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Twenty Years after De Ley and Blaxter—How Far Did We Progress in Understanding the Phylogeny of the Phylum Nematoda?2021In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 3479-3479Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Roberts, Nickellaus G.
    Adediran, Funmilola
    Smythe, Ashleigh B.
    Kocot, Kevin M.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogenomic Analysis of the Phylum Nematoda: Conflicts and Congruences With Morphology, 18S rRNA, and Mitogenomes2022In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 9, article id 769565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships within many lineages of the phylum Nematoda remainunresolved, despite numerous morphology-based and molecular analyses. Weperformed several phylogenomic analyses using 286 published genomes andtranscriptomes and 19 new transcriptomes by focusing on Trichinellida, Spirurina,Rhabditina, and Tylenchina separately, and by analyzing a selection of species fromthe whole phylum Nematoda. The phylogeny of Trichinellida supported the divisionof Trichinella into encapsulated and non-encapsulated species and placed them assister to Trichuris. The Spirurina subtree supported the clades formed by species fromAscaridomorpha and Spiruromorpha respectively, but did not support Dracunculoidea.The analysis of Tylenchina supported a clade that included all sampled species fromTylenchomorpha and placed it as sister to clades that included sampled speciesfrom Cephalobomorpha and Panagrolaimomorpha, supporting the hypothesis thatpostulates the single origin of the stomatostylet. The Rhabditina subtree placed a cladecomposed of all sampled species from Diplogastridae as sister to a lineage consistingof paraphyletic Rhabditidae, a single representative of Heterorhabditidae and a cladecomposed of sampled species belonging to Strongylida. It also strongly supportedall suborders within Strongylida. In the phylum-wide analysis, a clade composedof all sampled species belonging to Enoplia were consistently placed as sister toDorylaimia + Chromadoria. The topology of the Nematoda backbone was consistentwith previous studies, including polyphyletic placement of sampled representatives ofMonhysterida and Araeolaimida.

  • 9.
    Aleksija, Neijmane
    et al.
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Jasmine, Stavenow
    Statens Veterinärmedicinska Anstalt.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kallunki-Nyström, Jonas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Hälsa, sjukdomar och dödsorsaker hos marina däggdjur 2020: Resultat från obduktion och provtagning av marina däggdjur som undersökts på SVA2021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 10. ALIPANAH, HELEN
    et al.
    ASSELBERGS, JAN
    MALM, TOBIAS
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    SLAMKA, FRANTIŠEK
    Taxonomic study of the subfamily Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)in Iran2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5289, no 1, p. 1-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-seven species of the subfamily Pyraustinae from 17 genera and two tribes are listed. Anania verbascalis verbascalis ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1949) is considered as a senior synonym of A. verbascalis parvalis (Osthelder, 1935) syn. n.; Pyrausta virginalis Duponchel, 1832 as a senior synonym of P. perkeo Amsel, 1970 syn. n.; and P. ferrealis (Hampson, 1900) as a senior synonym of P. euergestalis Amsel, 1954 syn. n. Thirteen species, namely Anania coronata (Hufnagel, 1767), A. murcialis (Ragonot, 1895), A. terrealis (Treitschke, 1829), Pyrausta ferrealis (Hampson, 1900), P. armeniaca Slamka, 2013, P. zeitunalis Caradja, 1916, P. cingulata (Linnaeus, 1758), P. delicatalis Caradja, 1916, P. tatarica Kemal et al., 2020, Loxostege sedakowialis (Eversmann, 1852), L. wagneri Zerny in Wagner, 1929, L. mucosalis (Herrich-Schäffer, 1848) and L. peltaloides (Rebel in Wagner, 1932), are newly reported from Iran. Additionally, a redescription of the male of P. delicatalis and the female of L. sedakowialis, as well as description of the hitherto unknown female of P. delicatalis are presented. The intraspecific variations of the species if present are discussed and additional new diagnostic characters to separate the closely related species are presented. Data on the geographical distribution of the Iranian species of this subfamily are provided.

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  • 11.
    Alipanah, Helen
    et al.
    Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection (IRIPP).
    Malm, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Asselbergs, Jan
    A new species of Sitochroa Hübner, 1825 (Lepidoptera, Crambidae, Pyraustinae) from Iran, with taxonomic notes on the genus2020In: Nota lepidopterologica, ISSN 0342-7536, Vol. 43, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sitochroa urmiensis sp. nov. is described based on a single male collected in West Azarbaijan Province, Iran. Sitochroa palealis (Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775) is considered as a senior synonym of Loxostege farsalis Amsel, 1950 syn. nov. Loxostege malekalis Amsel, 1950 is transferred to the genus Sitochroa Hübner, as S. malekalis (Amsel, 1950) comb. nov. And the hitherto unknown female of S. malekalis is described and illustrated.

  • 12. Alstrom, Per
    et al.
    Rasmussen, Pamela C.
    Sangster, George
    Dalvi, Shashank
    Round, Philip D.
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Yao, Cheng-Te
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Le Manh, Hung
    Lei, Fumin
    Olsson, Urban
    Multiple species within the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex revealed through an integrative taxonomic approach2019In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We re-evaluated the taxonomy of the Striated Prinia Prinia crinigera-Brown Prinia P. polychroa complex using molecular, morphological and vocal analyses. The extensive seasonal, sexual, age-related, geographical and taxon-specific variation in this complex has never before been adequately studied. As no previous genetic or vocal analyses have focused on this group, misinterpretation of taxonomic signals from limited conventional morphological study alone was likely. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, we found that P. crinigera sensu lato (s.l.) comprises two non-sister groups of taxa (Himalayan crinigera and Chinese striata groups) that differ substantially morphologically and vocally and that are broadly sympatric in Yunnan Province, China. Prinia polychroa cooki (Myanmar) and P. p. rocki (southern Vietnam) are each morphologically, vocally and genetically distinct. Thai, Cambodian and Laotian populations formerly ascribed to P. p. cooki are morphologically and vocally most similar to and most closely related to Javan P. p. polychroa, and require a new name, proposed here. Prinia p. bangsi of Yunnan is part of the crinigera group rather than of P. polychroa, and hence there is no evidence for sympatry between P. polychroa s.l. and P. crinigera s.l., nor of the occurrence of P. polychroa in mainland China or Taiwan. We recommend the recognition of five species in the complex, with the following suggestions for new English names: Himalayan Prinia P. crinigera sensu stricto (s.s.; with subspecies striatula, crinigera, yunnanensis and bangsi); Chinese Prinia P. striata (subspecies catharia, parumstriata and striata); Burmese Prinia P. cooki (monotypic); Annam Prinia P. rocki (monotypic) and Deignan’s Prinia P. polychroa s.s. (subspecies Javan polychroa and the new Southeast Asian taxon). This study underlines the importance of using multiple datasets for the elucidation of diversity of cryptic bird species and their evolutionary history and biogeography.

  • 13. Alström, Per
    et al.
    Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin
    Enbody, Erik D.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Crochet, Pierre-André
    Guillaumet, Alban
    Rancilhac, Loïs
    Tieleman, B. Irene
    Olsson, Urban
    Donald, Paul F.
    Stervander, Martin
    Systematics of the avian family Alaudidae using multilocus and genomic data2023In: Avian Research, ISSN 2053-7166, Vol. 14, p. 100095-100095, article id 100095Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 14. Andersson, Ki
    et al.
    Norman, David
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sabertoothed carnivores and the killing of large prey2011In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 10, p. e24971-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sabre-like canines clearly have the potential to inflict grievous wounds leading to massive blood loss and rapid death. Hypotheses concerning sabretooth killing modes include attack to soft parts such as the belly or throat, where biting deep is essential to generate strikes reaching major blood vessels. Sabretoothed carnivorans are widely interpreted as hunters of larger and more powerful prey than that of their present-day nonsabretoothed relatives. However, the precise functional advantage of the sabretooth bite, particularly in relation to prey size, is unknown. Here, we present a new point-to-point bite model and show that, for sabretooths, depth of the killing bite decreases dramatically with increasing prey size. The extended gape of sabretooths only results in considerable increase in bite depth when biting into prey with a radius of less than ~10 cm. For sabretooths, this size-reversed functional advantage suggests predation on species within a similar size range to those attacked by present-day carnivorans, rather than “megaherbivores” as previously believed. The development of the sabretooth condition appears to represent a shift in function and killing behaviour, rather than one in predator-prey relations. Furthermore, our results demonstrate how sabretoothed carnivorans are likely to have evolved along a functionally continuous trajectory: beginning as an extension of a jaw-powered killing bite, as adopted by present-day pantherine cats, followed by neck-powered biting and thereafter shifting to neck-powered shear-biting. We anticipate this new insight to be a starting point for detailed study of the evolution of pathways that encompass extreme specialisation, for example, understanding how neck-powered biting shifts into shear-biting and its significance for predator-prey interactions. We also expect that our model for point-to-point biting and bite depth estimations will yield new insights into the behaviours of a broad range of extinct predators including therocephalians (gorgonopsian + cynodont, sabretoothed mammal-like reptiles), sauropterygians (marine reptiles) and theropod dinosaurs.

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  • 15. Andersson, Ki
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivora from the Late Miocene of Lantian, China2005In: Vertebrata PalAsiatica, Vol. 43, p. 256-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediments of the Bahe and Lantian formations, Lantian area, Shaanxi Province, China, have produced a large number of mammalian fossils. This Late Miocene sequence provides evidence for a period of major changes in the physical environment of the region. The carnivoran fossils are described and analyzed herein. The following species are present: lctitherium viverrinum, Hyaenictitherium cf . H. wongii and Adcrocuta eximia ( Hyaenidae) , cf. Metailurus major and cf. Metailurus parvulus ( Felidae) . Although a difference in the composition of the carnivoran fauna is noted towards the boundary between the Bahe Formation (lower) and Lantian Formation (upper), the cause of this is yet to be determined.

  • 16. Angerbjorn, Anders
    et al.
    Eide, Nina E.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Elmhagen, Bodil
    Hellstrom, Peter
    Ims, Rolf A.
    Killengreen, Siw
    Landa, Arild
    Meijer, Tomas
    Mela, Matti
    Niemimaa, Jukka
    Noren, Karin
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Yoccoz, Nigel G.
    Henttonen, Heikki
    Carnivore conservation in practice: replicated management actions on a large spatial scale2013In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Appeltans, Ward
    et al.
    Ahyong, Shane T.
    Anderson, Gary
    Angel, Martin V.
    Artois, Tom
    Bailly, Nicolas
    Bamber, Roger
    Barber, Anthony
    Bartsch, Ilse
    Berta, Annalisa
    Błażewicz-Paszkowycz, Magdalena
    Bock, Phil
    Boxshall, Geoff
    Boyko, Christopher B.
    Brandão, Simone Nunes
    Bray, Rod A.
    Bruce, Niel L.
    Cairns, Stephen D.
    Chan, Tin-Yam
    Cheng, Lanna
    Collins, Allen G.
    Cribb, Thomas
    Curini-Galletti, Marco
    Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid
    Davie, Peter J.F.
    Dawson, Michael N.
    De Clerck, Olivier
    Decock, Wim
    De Grave, Sammy
    de Voogd, Nicole J.
    Domning, Daryl P.
    Emig, Christian C.
    Erséus, Christer
    Eschmeyer, William
    Fauchald, Kristian
    Fautin, Daphne G.
    Feist, Stephen W.
    Fransen, Charles H.J.M.
    Furuya, Hidetaka
    Garcia-Alvarez, Oscar
    Gerken, Sarah
    Gibson, David
    Gittenberger, Arjan
    Gofas, Serge
    Gómez-Daglio, Liza
    Gordon, Dennis P.
    Guiry, Michael D.
    Hernandez, Francisco
    Hoeksema, Bert W.
    Hopcroft, Russell R.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Magnitude of Global Marine Species Diversity2012In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 22, no 23, p. 2189-2202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Artedi, Peter
    Alli, H (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Broberg, G (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Christensson, J (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Kullander, Sven (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    Strandberg, C.-O. (Author of afterword, colophon, etc.)
    Alli, H. (Translator)
    Ichthyologia2022Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    A taxonomic review and revisions of Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha)2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0212073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomidae (Platyhelminthes: Macrostomorpha) diversity has been almost entirely ignored within recent years, likely due to inconsistent and often old taxonomic literature and a general rarity of sexually mature collected specimens. Herein, we reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of the group using both previously published and new 18S and CO1 gene sequences. We present some taxonomic revisions of Microstomidae and further describe 8 new species of Microstomum based on both molecular and morphological evidence. Finally, we briefly review the morphological taxonomy of each species and provide a key to aid in future research and identification that is not dependent on reproductive morphology. Our goal is to clarify the taxonomy and facilitate future research into an otherwise very understudied group of tiny (but important) flatworms.

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  • 20.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Biodiversity between sand grains: Meiofauna composition across southern and western Sweden assessed by metabarcoding2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e51813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The meiofauna is an important part of the marine ecosystem, but its composition and distribution patterns are relatively unexplored. Here we assessed the biodiversity and community structure of meiofauna from five locations on the Swedish western and southern coasts using a high-throughput DNA sequencing (metabarcoding) approach. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) mini-barcode and nuclear 18S small ribosomal subunit (18S) V1-V2 region were amplified and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq technology. Our analyses revealed a higher number of species than previously found in other areas: thirteen samples comprising 6.5 dm3 sediment revealed 708 COI and 1,639 18S metazoan OTUs. Across all sites, the majority of the metazoan biodiversity was assigned to ArthropodaNematoda and Platyhelminthes. Alpha and beta diversity measurements showed that community composition differed significantly amongst sites. OTUs initially assigned to AcoelaGastrotricha and the two Platyhelminthes sub-groups Macrostomorpha and Rhabdocoela were further investigated and assigned to species using a phylogeny-based taxonomy approach. Our results demonstrate that there is great potential for discovery of new meiofauna species even in some of the most extensively studied locations.

  • 21.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Microstomum (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomorpha, Microstomidae) from the Swedish west coast: two new species and a population description2018In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, no 398, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Atherton, Sarah
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wide distributions and cryptic diversity within a Microstomum (Platyhelminthes) species complex2018In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 47, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstomum lineare is a common species of fresh and brackish waters found world-wide. Three genes (18S, CO1 and ITS) were sequenced from specimens of M. lineare collected from four countries, and the levels of cryptic diversity and genetic structuring were assessed. Results showed M. lineare has very wide haplotype distributions suggesting higher than expected dispersal capabilities. In addition, three new species were described on the basis of molecular taxonomy: Microstomum artoisi sp. nov., Microstomum tchaikovskyi sp. nov. and Microstomum zicklerorum sp. nov.

  • 23. Autenrieth, Marijke
    et al.
    Havenstein, Katja
    De Cahsan, Binia
    Canitz, Julia
    Benke, Harald
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Pampoulie, Christophe
    Sigurðsson, Guðjón Már
    Siebert, Ursula
    Olsen, Morten Tange
    Biard, Vincent
    Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter
    Öztürk, Ayaka Amaha
    Öztürk, Bayram
    Lawson, John W.
    Tiedemann, Ralph
    Genome-wide analysis of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) indicates isolation-by-distance across the North Atlantic and potential local adaptation in adjacent waters2023In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Balog, Luca Eszter
    et al.
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Török, Júlia Katalin
    Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redescription of an insect-associated nematode, Reiterina typica (Stefański, 1922) Sudhaus, 2011 (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae) found in scarab grubs in Hungary2023In: Nematology (Leiden. Print), ISSN 1388-5545, E-ISSN 1568-5411, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 699-712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Balog, Luca Eszter
    et al.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Török, Julia Katalin
    PREVALENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF DIFFERENT NATURAL ENEMIES IN THE HARLEQUIN LADYBIRD HARMONIA AXYRIDIS (COLEOPTERA COCCINELLIDAE)2021In: Redia, E-ISSN 0370-4327, article id General Agricultural and Biological SciencesArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Barani-Beiranvand, Hossein
    et al.
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran..
    Aliabadian, Mansour
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, RDZI, Mashhad, Iran..
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Qu, Yanhua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Darvish, Jamshid
    Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Dept Biol, Fac Sci, Khorasan E Razavi, Mashhad, Iran.;Ferdowsi Univ Mashhad, Inst Appl Zool, Res Dept Rodentol, Mashhad, Iran..
    Szekely, Tamas
    Univ Bath, Dept Biol & Biochem, Bath, Avon, England..
    van Dijk, Rene E.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Anim & Plant Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phylogeny of penduline tits inferred from mitochondrial and microsatellite genotyping2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 932-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penduline tits (Remiz spp.) are renowned for their diverse mating and parenting strategies, and are a well-studied system by behavioural ecologists. However, the phylogenetic relationships and species delimitations within this genus are poorly understood. Here, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within the genus Remiz by examining the genetic variation in the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene of 64 individuals and in ten autosomal microsatellite markers from 44 individuals. The taxon sampling includes individuals from all currently recognized species (R. pendulinus, R. macronyx, R. coronatus, and R. consobrinus) and most subspecies in the Palearctic region. We showed that R. coronatus and R. consobrinus are genetically well differentiated and constitute independent evolutionary lineages, separated from each other and from R. pendulinus/macronyx. However, we found no evidence for significant differentiation among R. pendulinus/macronyx individuals in mtDNA haplotypes and only marginal differences between R. pendulinus and R. macronyx in microsatellite markers. Hence, based on present data our recommendation is to treat R. pendulinus and R. macronyx as conspecific and R. coronatus and R. consobrinus as separate species.

  • 27.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Collins, Desmond
    Chancelloriids of the Cambrian Burgess Shale2015In: Palaeontologia Electronica, ISSN 1935-3952, E-ISSN 1094-8074, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cactus-like chancelloriids from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale are revised on the basis of Walcott’s (1920) original collections and new material containing several hundred specimens collected by Royal Ontario Museum field expeditions from 1975 to 2000. Walcott’s interpretation of chancelloriids as sponges was based on a misinterpretation of the dermal coelosclerites as embedded sponge-type spicules, an interpretation that further led to the lumping of three distinct taxa into one species, Chancelloria eros Walcott, 1920. The other two taxa are herein separated from C. eros and described as Allonnia tintinopsis n.sp. and Archiasterella coriacea n.sp., all belonging to the Family Chancelloriidae Walcott, 1920. Chancelloriids were sedentary animals, anchored to shells or lumps of debris in the muddy bottom, or to sponges, or to other chancelloriids. They had a radially symmetrical body and an apical orifice surrounded by a palisade of modified sclerites. Well-preserved integuments in Al. tintinopsis and Ar. coriacea do not show any ostium-like openings. Neither is there any evidence for internal organs, such as a gut. Partly narrowed specimens suggest that the body periodically contracted from the attached end to expel waste material from the body cavity. Chancelloriids were close in organization to cnidarians but shared the character of coelosclerites with the bilaterian halkieriids and siphogonuchitids. The taxon Coeloscleritophora is most likely paraphyletic.

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  • 28.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Cunningham, John A.
    Yin, Chongyu
    Donoghue, Philip C.J.
    University of Bristol.
    A merciful death for the “earliest bilaterian,” Vernanimalcula.2012In: Evolution and Development, ISSN 1520-541x, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 421-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fossils described as Vernanimalcula guizhouena, from the nearly 600 million-year-old Doushantuo Formation in South China, have been interpreted as the remains of bilaterian animals. As such they would represent the oldest putative record of bilaterian animals in Earth history, and they have been invoked in debate over this formative episode of early animal evolution. However, this interpretation is fallacious. We review the evidential basis of the biological interpretation of Vernanimalcula, concluding that the structures key to animal identity are effects of mineralization that do not represent biological tissues, and, furthermore, that it is not possible to derive its anatomical reconstruction on the basis of the available evidence. There is no evidential basis for interpreting Vernanimalcula as an animal, let alone a bilaterian. The conclusions of evolutionary studies that have relied upon the bilaterian interpretation of Vernanimalcula must be called into question.

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    Bengtson_etal_2012_Vernanimalcula_manuscript
  • 29.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Haliplidae, crawling water beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1041-1043Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Hydroscaphidae, skiff beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1050-1051Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Torridincolidae, torrent beetles2022In: The New Natural History of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1047-1049Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Göthberg, Anders
    Johansson, Karolina
    Pettersson, Arne
    Burkart, Werner
    Burkart, Gudrun
    Entomologmötet på Gotland 2017: temaexkursion med fokus på vattenlevande skalbaggar, skinnbaggar och trollsländor i Äskåkersvät.2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yearly Swedish entomology meeting 2017 was organized by the local entomology

    society of Gotland, on the northern part of the Baltic island Gotland near Bunge, 4-6 August.

    One thematic excursion was focused on aquatic insects, especiallly aquatic beetles,

    bugs and dragonflies. A shallow pond, Äskåkersvät, with Characeae in an open grazed

    landscape with high natural values was studied. Äskåkersvät lies just adjacent to the larger

    area around lake Bästeträsk which is the focus of a pilot study evaluating its potential as

    a future national park. The pilot study is undertaken by Gotland County Administrative

    Board, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Region Gotland and the Swedish

    Agency for Marine and Water Management. Here we give an annotated report of the 103

    species found: 69 species of water beetles (out of which 34 were Dytiscidae), 20 species

    of aquatic or semiaquatic bugs (out of which 10 were Corixidae), and 14 species of dragonflies.

    These include Hydrophilus piceus and H. aterrimus redlisted in Sweden (both as

    NT), and Dytiscus latissimus, globally redlisted (VU). We also noted the noble crayfish,

    Astacus astacus (redlisted as CR in Sweden) and the European medicinal leech Hirudo

    medicinalis (redlisted as NT globally). The blue emperor dragonfly (Anax imperator) was

    noted, a species first recorded from Gotland in 2002 and we present a graph on its increase

    and spreading on the island since. The number of species found in spite of a relatively

    modest collecting effort at a suboptimal time when many species may be in pupal stage out

    of water as witnessed by many teneral individuals, indicates a species rich locality with

    high natural value. The stoneworts (Characeae) vegetation certainly contributes to this, for

    instance vouched for by the occurrence of specialists as Haliplus confinis and H. obliquus

    whose larvae feed on stoneworts.

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  • 33.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindberg, Gunvi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Apelqvist, Niklas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Brodin, Yngve
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Arbetet med donationer av insektsamlingar vid Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet2014In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 134, p. 153-162Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the work with donated insect collections at the Swedish Museum of Natural

    History (NRM) in Stockholm, Sweden. The museum receives donations yearly from

    amateur entomologists, and they are an important contribution to the enrichment of the

    collections. For the collector it is satisfying that a public institution takes on the long term

    responsibility of safeguarding the scientific value in a collection, curating and making it

    available for study. Significant donations in the last years include that of Lars Huggert

    (Hymenoptera, Coleoptera), Hans Bartsch (Diptera) and Anders N. Nilsson (aquatic Coleoptera)

    to name a few. The curatorial and digitizing workload at the Entomology collection

    are unfortunately not matched by staff funding, and as at other European museums

    volunteer work constitute vital and invaluable help. We acknowledge especially some of

    the volunteer work in the Coleoptera and Hymenoptera collections. Recently we have engaged

    with amateur entomologists by organizing taxon-specific workshops at the museum

    which has stimulated exchange and collaboration. The Hymenoptera-day was visited by 30

    participants, and the Diptera-meeting by 49. As an example of what happens with a donation

    once it reaches the museum, we describe the work with a recent Coleoptera collection

    donation by Jan Olsson, Vallentuna. A few highlights from the unidentified material,

    including the Archostematan beetle Priacma serrata (Cupedidae) and the false jewelbeetle

    Schizopus laetus (Schizopodidae), are presented as they were new to the NRM collections.

    We also bring attention to two new websites: www.naturarv.se is the webportal presenting

    digitized material in Swedish natural history collections. Both metadata on specimens and

    photos are made searchable here. We also launch a new webpage at www.nrm.se/insektsdonationer

    where we write about new donations to the Entomology collections, with Jan

    Olsson’s Coleoptera collection first out.

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    Bergsten etal_2014_ET
  • 34.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Manuel, Michael
    Coleoptera: Noteridae, burrowing water beetles2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1044-1047Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bergsten, Johannes
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Manuel, Michael
    Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    Ramahandrison, Andriamirado T.
    Hajek, Jiri
    Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, diving beetles, tsikovoka2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1024-1034Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36. Bernor, R. L.
    et al.
    Fahlbusch, V.
    Andrews, P.
    De Bruijn, H.
    Fortelius, M.
    Rögl, F.
    Steininger, F. F.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The evolution of western Eurasian Neogene faunas: a chronologic, systematic, biogeographic, and paleoenvironmental synthesis1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 449-469Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37. Bernor, R. L.
    et al.
    Kordos, L.
    Rook, L.
    Agustí, J. C.
    Andrews, P.
    Armour-Chelu, M.
    Begun, D. R.
    Cameron, D. W.
    Daxner-Höck, G.
    Bonis, L. de
    Ekart, D.
    Fessaha, N.
    Fortelius, M.
    Franzen, J.-L.
    Mihály Gasparik, M.
    Gentry, A. G.
    Heissig, K.
    Hernyak, G.
    Kaiser, T.
    Koufos, G. D.
    Krolopp, E.
    Jánossy, D.
    Llenas, M.
    Meszáros, L.
    Müller, P.
    Renne, P.
    Rocék, Z.
    Sen, S.
    Scott, R.
    Szyndlar, Z.
    Theobald, G.
    Topál, G.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Ungar, P. S.
    Ziegler, R.
    Recent Advances on Multidisciplinary Research at Rudabánya, Late Miocene (MN9), Hungary: a compendium2004In: Palaeontographia Italica, Vol. 89, p. 3-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Blank, Stephan M
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Case 3538: CORYNINAE Benson, 1938 (Insecta, Hymenoptera, CIMBICIDAE): proposed emendation of spelling to CORYNIDINAE to remove homonymy with CORYNIDAE Johnston, 1836 (Cnidaria, Anthoathecata)2011In: Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Bohlin, Johan
    et al.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Lapplandsfödd havsörnshona häckar i Värmland2017In: Värmlandsornitologen, Vol. 44, p. 17-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Bohlin, Johan
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Värmland.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Örnföda. Mest braxen och gädda2014In: Värmlandsornitologen, Vol. 41, p. 10-13-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41. Boissin, Emilie
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Did vicariance and adaptation drive cryptic speciation and evolution of brooding in Ophioderma longicauda (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea), a common Atlanto-Mediterranean ophiuroid?2011In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 20, no 22, p. 4737-4755Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description  of  a  new  species  of  Paracrobeles  Heyns,  1968  (Nematoda,   Rhabditida, Cephalobidae)  from  Kelso  Dunes,  Mojave  National   Preserve,  California,  USA2015In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 117, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Paracrobeles, P. kelsodunensis sp. nov. is described from the Kelso Dunes area, Mojave National Preserve, southern California. Paracrobeles kelsodunensis sp. nov. is particularly characterised by a body length of 469–626 μm in females and 463–569 μm in males; lateral field with four incisures, extending almost to tail terminus; three pairs of asymmetrical lips, separated by U-shaped primary axils with two long guarding processes, each lip usually with four tines along its margin; three long labial probolae, deeply bifurcated, with slender prongs without tines; metastegostom with a strong anteriorly directed dorsal tooth; pharyngeal corpus anteriorly spindle-shaped, posteriorly elongate bulbous with dilated lumen; spermatheca 24–87 μm long; postvulval uterine sac 60–133 μm long; vulva in a sunken area; spicules 33–38 μm long; and male tail with a 5–8 μm long mucro. The generic diagnosis is emended on the basis of recently described species and a key to the species of Paracrobeles is provided.

  • 43.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Description of Drilocephalobus moldavicus Lisetskaya,1968 (Rhabditida: Osstellidae) from Kelso Dunes, Mojave National Reserve, California,USA2018In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4514, no 3, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Descriptions of species of Stegelleta Thorne, 1938 (Nematoda, Rhabditida, Cephalobidae) from California, New Zealand and Senegal, and a revision of the genus2014In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 87, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations of Stegelleta are described from California, New Zealand and Senegal. An amphimictic population from California is identified as belonging to S. incisa and compared with type specimens from Utah and an amphimictic population from Italy. One population from New Zealand is close to S. incisa but considered to represent a new species, Stegelleta laterocornuta sp. nov. It is particularly characterised by a 379–512 μm long body in females and 365–476 μm in males; cuticle divided into 16 rows of blocks at midbody (excluding lateral field); lateral field with four incisures; three pairs of asymmetrical lips, U-shaped primary axils without guarding processes, each lip asymmetrically rectangular with a smooth margin, only lateral lips have slender acute tines; three labial probolae, bifurcated at half of their length; vulva without flap; spermatheca 17–31 μm long; postuterine sac 7–24 μm long; spicules 21.5–23.5 μm long. Other specimens from New Zealand are identified as belonging to S. tuarua. A parthenogenetic population from Senegal is identified as belonging to S. ophioglossa and compared with type specimens from Mongolia and records of several other populations of S. ophioglossa. The generic diagnosis is emended and a key to the species of Stegelleta is provided.

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  • 45.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Suktorier (Ciliophora – ciliater) som beskrivits av Carl Allgén2023In: Fauna & flora: en spegling av svensk natur, E-ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 48-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Boström, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Swedish marine nematologist Carl Allgén (1886–1960): a bio-bibliography and his collection2017In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4232, no 4, p. 451-490Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Brace, Selina
    et al.
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Lister, Adrian M.
    Miller, Rebecca
    Otte, Marcel
    Germonpre, Mietje
    Blockley, Simon P. E.
    Stewart, John R.
    Barnes, Ian
    Serial population extinctions in a small mammal indicate Late Pleistocene ecosystem instability2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 50, p. 20532-20536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Brantberg, Krister
    et al.
    Babak, F.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Do extant elephants have superior canal dehiscence syndrome?2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Britt-Marie, Bäcklin
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Sara, Persson
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Suzanne, Faxneld
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Frank, Rigét F.
    Anna, Roos M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring. phD, Curator.
    Temporal and Geographical Variation of Intestinal Ulcers in Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) and Environmental Contaminants in Baltic Biota during Four Decades2021In: Animals, E-ISSN 2076-2615, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 2968-2968Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. Britz, R.
    et al.
    Kottelat, M
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    A note on Muraena alba Zuiew, 1793 (Teleostei: Synbranchidae)2021In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4949, no 2, p. 398-400Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 531
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