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  • 1. Betts, Marissa, J.
    et al.
    Claybourn, Thomas M.
    Brock, Glenn, A.
    Jago, James, B.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Paterson, John, R.
    Shelly fossils from the lower Cambrian White Point Conglomerate, Kangaroo Island, South Australia2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 489-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Cambrian (Series 2) White Point Conglomerate (WPC) on Kangaroo Island, South Australia contains exoticclasts representing a diverse array of lithologies, including metamorphics, chert, sandstone, and abundant carbonates,notably archaeocyath-rich bioclastic limestone. Acetic acid digestion of the WPC bioclastic limestone clasts reveals adiverse shelly fauna. This assemblage includes abundant organophosphatic brachiopods such as Cordatia erinae Brockand Claybourn gen. et sp. nov., Curdus pararaensis, Eodicellomus elkaniformiis, Eohadrotreta sp. cf. E. zhenbaensis,Eoobolus sp., Kyrshabaktella davidii, and Schizopholis yorkensis. Additional shelly taxa include the solenopleurid trilobiteTrachoparia? sp., the tommotiids Dailyatia odyssei, Dailyatia decobruta Betts sp. nov., Kelanella sp., and Lapworthellafasciculata, spines of the bradoriid arthropod Mongolitubulus squamifer, and several problematica, such as Stoibostrombuscrenulatus and a variety of tubular forms. The upper age limit for the WPC is constrained by biostratigraphic data fromthe overlying Marsden Sandstone and Emu Bay Shale, which are no younger than the Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone(Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4). The shelly fossil assemblage from the WPC limestone clasts indicates an upper Dailyatiaodyssei Zone (= Pararaia tatei to lower P. janeae trilobite zones), equivalent to the Atdabanian–early Botoman of theSiberian scheme. This contrasts with the previously suggested late Botoman age for the limestone clasts, based on the diversearchaeocyath assemblage. The minor age difference between the WPC and its fossiliferous limestone clasts suggestsrelatively rapid reworking of biohermal buildups during tectonically-active phases of deposition in the Stansbury Basin.

  • 2.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Weaver, Patricia G.
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
    Ciampaglio, Charles N.
    Wright State University.
    A unique late Eocene coleoid cephalopod Mississaepia from Mississippi, USA: New data on cuttlebone structure, and their phylogenetic implications.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new family, Mississaepiidae, from the Sepia–Spirula branch of decabrachian coleoids (Cephalopoda), is erected on the basis of the following, recently revealed, morphological, ultrastructural and chemical traits of the cuttlebone in the late Eocene Mississaepia, formerly referred to Belosaepiidae: (i) septa are semi−transparent, largely chitinous (as opposed to all other recorded cephalopods having non−transparent aragonitic septa); (ii) septa have a thin lamello−fibrillar nacreous covering (Sepia lacks nacre altogether, Spirula has fully lamello−fibrillar nacreous septa, ectochochleate cephalopods have columnar nacre in septa); (iii) a siphonal tube is present in early ontogeny (similar to siphonal tube development of the Danian Ceratisepia, and as opposed to complete lack of siphonal tube in Sepiaand siphonal tube development through its entire ontogeny in Spirula); (iv) the lamello−fibrillar nacreous ultrastructure of septal necks (similar to septal necks in Spirula); (v) a sub−hemispherical protoconch (as opposed to the spherical protoconchs of the Danian Ceratisepia and Recent Spirula); (vi) conotheca has ventro−lateral extension in early ontogenetic stages (as opposed to Sepia that has no ventro−lateral extention of the conotheca and to Spirula that retains fully−developed phragmocone throughout its entire ontogeny). Chitinous composition of septa in Mississaepia is deduced from (i) their visual similarity to the chitinous semi−transparent flange of Sepia, (ii) angular and rounded outlines and straight compressive failures of the partial septa and mural parts of septa similar to mechanically−damaged dry rigid chitinous flange of Sepia or a gladius of squid, and (iii) organics consistent with −chitin preserved in the shell. The family Mississaepiidae may represent a unknown lineage of the Sepia–Spirulabranch of coleoids, a conotheca lacking a nacreous layer being a common trait of the shell of this branch. However, Mississaepiidae is placed with reservation in Sepiida because of similarities between their gross shell morphology (a cuttlebone type of shell) and inorganic−organic composition. In Mississaepia, as in Sepia, the shell contains up to 6% of nitrogen by weight; phosphatised sheets within the dorsal shield may have been originally organic, like similar structures in Sepia; accumulations of pyrite in peripheral zones of aragonitic spherulites and in−between the spherulites of the dorsal shield may also indicate additional locations of organics in the shell of living animal.

  • 3.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Weaver, Patricia
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences; U.S.A..
    Ciampaglio, Charles
    Department of Geology, Wright State University−Lake Campus.
    A unique late Eocene coleoid cephalopod Mississaepia from Mississippi, USA: New data on cuttlebone structure, and their phylogenetic implications.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new family, Mississaepiidae, from the Sepia–Spirula branch of decabrachian coleoids (Cephalopoda), is erected on the basis of the following, recently revealed, morphological, ultrastructural and chemical traits of the cuttlebone in the late Eocene Mississaepia, formerly referred to Belosaepiidae: (i) septa are semi−transparent, largely chitinous (as opposed to all other recorded cephalopods having non−transparent aragonitic septa); (ii) septa have a thin lamello−fibrillar nacreous covering (Sepia lacks nacre altogether, Spirula has fully lamello−fibrillar nacreous septa, ectochochleate cephalopods have columnar nacre in septa); (iii) a siphonal tube is present in early ontogeny (similar to siphonal tube development of the Danian Ceratisepia, and as opposed to complete lack of siphonal tube in Sepia and siphonal tube development through its entire ontogeny in Spirula); (iv) the lamello−fibrillar nacreous ultrastructure of septal necks (similar to septal necks in Spirula); (v) a sub−hemispherical protoconch (as opposed to the spherical protoconchs of the Danian Ceratisepia and Recent Spirula); (vi) conotheca has ventro−lateral extension in early ontogenetic stages (as opposed to Sepia that has no ventro−lateral extention of the conotheca and to Spirula that retains fully−developed phragmocone throughout its entire ontogeny). Chitinous composition of septa in Mississaepia is deduced from (i) their visual similarity to the chitinous semi−transparent flange of Sepia, (ii) angular and rounded outlines and straight compressive failures of the partial septa and mural parts of septa similar to mechanically−damaged dry rigid chitinous flange of Sepia or a gladius of squid, and (iii) organics consistent with [1]−chitin preserved in the shell. The family Mississaepiidae may represent a unknown lineage of the Sepia–Spirula branch of coleoids, a conotheca lacking a nacreous layer being a common trait of the shell of this branch. However, Mississaepiidae is placed with reservation in Sepiida because of similarities between their gross shell morphology (a cuttlebone type of shell) and inorganic−organic composition. In Mississaepia, as in Sepia, the shell contains up to 6% of nitrogen by weight; phosphatised sheets within the dorsal shield may have been originally organic, like similar structures in Sepia; accumulations of pyrite in peripheral zones of aragonitic spherulites and in−between the spherulites of the dorsal shield may also indicate additional locations of organics in the shell of living animal.

  • 4.
    Hryniewicz, Krzysztof
    et al.
    Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa.
    Amano, Kazutaka
    Department of Geoscience, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata.
    Jenkins, Robert
    School of Natural System, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa City, Ishikawa .
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous and Paleogene cold seeps2017In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a systematic study of thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous to Oligocene seep carbonates worldwide. Eleven species of thyasirid bivalves are identified belonging to three genera: Conchocele, Maorithyas, and Thyasira. Two species are new: Maorithyas humptulipsensis sp. nov. from middle Eocene seep carbonates in the Humptulips Formation, Washington State, USA, and Conchocele kiritachiensis sp. nov. from the late Eocene seep deposit at Kiritachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Two new combinations are provided: Conchocele townsendi (White, 1890) from Maastrichtian strata of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica, and Maorithyas folgeri (Wagner and Schilling, 1923) from Oligocene rocks from California, USA. Three species are left in open nomenclature. We show that thyasirids have Mesozoic origins and appear at seeps before appearing in “normal” marine environments. These data are interpreted as a record of seep origination of thyasirids, and their subsequent dispersal to non-seep environments. We discuss the age of origination of thyasirids in the context of the origin of the modern deep sea fauna and conclude that thyasirids could have deep sea origins. This hypothesis is supported by the observed lack of influence of the Cretaceous and Paleogene Oceanic Anoxic Events on the main evolutionary lineages of the thyasirids, as seen in several other members of the deep sea fauna.

  • 5.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kiel, Steffen
    A middle Eocene seep deposit with silicified fauna from the Humptulips Formation in western Washington State, USA2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 751-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonate blocks with silicified fossils were recovered from a newly recognized cold seep deposit, the Satsop  Weatherwax site, in the basal Humptulips Formation, along the West Fork of Satsop River in Washington State, USA. The petrography and the stable carbon isotope signature of the carbonate, with values as low as -43.5‰, indicate that these carbonate blocks formed at an ancient methane seep. The fossils recovered from this block include five vesicomyid specimens, two fragments of a thyasirid, five specimens of the peltospirid Depressigyra, two specimens of the hyalogyrinid Hyalogyrina, 25 specimens of the neritimorph Thalassonerita eocenica, and three limpet specimens of two different species. Five species can be described as new: Nuculana acutilineata (Nuculanoidea), Desbruyeresia belliatus (Provannidae), Provanna fortis (Provannidae), Orbitestella dioi (Orbitestellidae), and Leptochiton terryiverseni (Polyplacophora). Other fossils recovered from this site are numerous serpulid tubes, echinoid spines, one brachiopod fragment and two neogastropods. Almost all species recovered belong to extant genera and the fauna has a modern character, but are different from species found in younger seeps in Washington State. This is the first record of an orbitestellid from an ancient cold seep deposit, the first fossil provannids from the Humptulips Formation, and the first fossil record of Desbruyeresia from North America.

  • 6. Jadwiszczak, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Aspects of diversity in early Antarctic penguins2011In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Three new bivalve genera from Triassic hydrocarbon seep deposits in southern Turkey2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 221-234Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sami, Marco
    Taviani, Marco
    A serpulid-Anodontia-dominated methane-seep deposit from the Miocene of northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taviani, Marco
    Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the late Pliocene Stirone River hydrocarbon seep complex in northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 557-568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Clausen, Sébastien
    Université de Lille.
    Vendrasco, Michael J.
    California State University, Fullerton, CA.
    An early Cambrian fauna of skeletal fossils from the Emyaksin Formation, northern Siberia.2015In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 421-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of mineralised skeletal fossils containing molluscs, hyoliths, halkieriids, chancelloriids, tommotiids, lobopodians, paleoscolecids, bradoriids, echinoderms, anabaritids, hyolithelminths, hexactinnelid, and heteractinid sponges is described from the early Cambrian Emyaksin Formation exposed along the Malaya Kuonamka and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers, eastern flanks of the Anabar Uplift, northern Siberian Platform. The sampled succession is attributed to the Tommotian–Botoman Stages of Siberia and correlated with Stage 2 of Series 1–Stage 4 of Series 2 of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian. Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy is applied herein for regional correlation. The fauna contains the earliest Siberian and probably global first appearances of lobopodians, paleoscolecids, and echinoderms, and includes elements in common with coeval faunas from Gondwana, Laurentia, and Baltica. For the first time from Siberia, the latest occurrence of anabaritids is documented herein from the Atdabanian Stage. Problematic calcium phosphatic sclerites of Fengzuella zhejiangensis have not been previously known from outside China. The sellate sclerites, Camenella garbowskae and mitral sclerites, C. kozlowskii are unified within one species, C. garbowskae. In addition to more common slender sclerites, Rhombocorniculum insolutum include broad calcium phosphatic sclerites. A number of fossils described herein demonstrate excellent preservation of fine details of skeletal microstructures. Based on new microstructural data, sclerites of Rhombocorniculum are interpreted as chaetae of the type occurring in annelids. A new mollusc Enigmaconus? pyramidalis Kouchinsky and Vendrasco sp. nov. and a hyolith Triplicatella papilio Kouchinsky sp. nov. are described.

  • 11.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Landing, Ed
    New York State Museum.
    Steiner, Michael
    Freie Universität Berlin.
    Vendrasco, Michael
    Pasadena City College.
    Ziegler, Karen
    University of New Mexico.
    Terreneuvian stratigraphy and faunas from the Anabar Uplift, Siberia.2017In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 311-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Stefen, Clara
    The castorid Steneofiber from NW Germany and its implications for the taxonomy of Miocene beavers2010In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Pott, C
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The Triassic flora of Svalbard2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, p. 709-740Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    The problematic early Cambrian fossil Tumulduria incomperta represents the detached ventral interarea of a paterinid brachiopod.2014In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 359-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organophosphatic early Cambrian (Terreneuvian, Cambrian Stage 2) fossil Tumulduria incomperta has been problematic ever since its original description in 1969. Comparison of abundant specimens from the Lower Cambrian of Siberia with co-occurring brachiopod valves show that T. incomperta represents the central portion of the ventral interarea of a paterinid brachiopod similar to Cryptotreta neguertchenensis, and that the domed central portion of typical Tumulduria specimens represents the ridge-like pseudodeltidium of the interarea.

  • 15.
    Topper, Timothy P.
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Balthasar, Uwe
    University of Glasgow.
    Harper, David A.T.
    The oldest brachiopods from the lower Cambrian of South Australia2013In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphology and organophosphatic shell structure of the paterinate brachiopod Askepasma is documented using new and previously collected specimens from the lower Cambrian of South Australia. Lack of adequately preserved material has seen the majority of paterinate specimens previously reported from South Australia referred to the genus Askepasma and treated under open nomenclature. Large collections of paterinates from the lower Cambrian Wilkawillina, Ajax, and Wirrapowie limestones in the Arrowie Basin, South Australia have prompted redescription of the type species Askepasma toddense and the erection of a new species, Askepasma saproconcha sp. nov. Askepasma saproconcha sp. nov. currently represents the oldest known brachiopod from the lower Cambrian successions in South Australia with a FAD in pre−trilobitic (Terreneuvian, Cambrian Stage 2, lower Atdabanian) strata in the basal part of the Wilkawillina and Wirrapowie limestones. Askepasma toddense predominantly occurs in Abadiella huoi Zone equivalent strata (Unnamed Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3, middle–upper Atdabanian) in the upper part of the lower Wilkawillina, Wirrapowie, and Ajax limestones. The shell microstructure of Askepasma suggests a proximal stem group position within the Brachiopoda and similarities with tommotiid taxa provides further evidence that the ancestry of crown group brachiopods is firmly entrenched within the Tommotiida.

  • 16. Wesley-Hunt, Gina D.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Basicranial morphology and phylogenetic position of the upper Eocene carnivoramorphan Quercygale.2005In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 50, p. 837-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quercygale angustidens is a small, early carnivoramorphan from the upper Eocene of northwest Europe including the Phosphorites du Quercy, France. Although there is extensive material of the genus, very little has been published on the auditory region which is an important character complex for taxonomy and phylogenetic studies. This paper presents a detailed description of the basicranium of an undistorted partial skull of Quercygale. The new data form the basis for a phylogenetic analysis of Quercygale in the context of basal carnivoramorphan interrelationships. Quercygale has a mix of derived and plesiomorphic characters. The promontorium is highly derived, and unlike that of any other “miacoid”. Yet, based on the evidence from surrounding bones the bulla does not appear to be as expanded as in other closely related miacids. In the phylogenetic analysis Quercygale is the sister−taxon to Nimravidae and crown−group Carnivora, and it appears to be the most derived of the stem−group Miacidae. We discuss the implications that the position of Quercygale has on carnivoramorphan phylogenetics.

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