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  • 101.
    Fernholm, Bo
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kullander, Sven O.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Quattrini, Andrea M.
    Zintzen, Vincent
    Roberts, Clive D.
    Mok, Hin-Kiu
    Kuo, Chien-Hsien
    Hagfish phylogeny and taxonomy, with description of the new genus Rubicundus (Craniata, Myxinidae)2013In: Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, ISSN 0947-5745, E-ISSN 1439-0469, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 296-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent phylogenetic analysis of the Myxinidae based on the 16S rRNA gene resulted in synonymization of Paramyxine with Eptatretus. This created homonymy of Paramyxine fernholmi with Eptatretus fernholmi and Paramyxine wisneri with Eptatretus wisneri. In order to resolve this nomenclatural dilemma, we made a more extensive phylogenetic assessment of the Myxinidae and examined the nomenclature of the family. We used 75 sequences (37 of which new for this study) of a 561 bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene, representing 33 species, and 72 sequences (37 of which new for this study) of a 687 bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, representing 23 species, to reconstruct the phylogeny of Myxinidae. The monophyly of the subfamily Myxininae, traditionally characterized by having a single pair of external gill openings, was rejected (0.50 Bayesian posterior probability) by the 16S analysis, but supported by the COI and combined COI+16S analyses (0.99 and 0.81 Bpp, respectively). The monophyly of the subfamily Eptatretinae, characterized by having several pairs of external gill openings, was not supported by the 16S analysis and rejected by the COI and combined COI+16S analysis due to the placement of Eptatretus lopheliae as the earliest branch of Myxinidae (0.71 and 0.57 Bpp, respectively). Eptatretus lopheliae and Eptatretus rubicundus formed a monophyletic group and were allocated to a new genus, Rubicundus, characterized by the presence of an elongated tubular nostril and reddish coloration. A new monotypic subfamily, Rubicundinae, was proposed for Rubicundus. The synonymy of the genera Paramyxine and Quadratus with Eptatretus was confirmed. E. fernholmi is renamed Eptatretus luzonicus. Eptatretus wisneri was renamed Eptatretus bobwisneri. Petromyzon cirrhatus Forster, 1801, Homea banksii Fleming, 1822, and Bdellostoma forsteri Müller, 1836 are synonyms, but no type specimens are known to exist. Petromyzon cirrhatus was designated as type species of Eptatretus, conserving present usage. Gastrobranchus dombeyi Shaw, 1804 has priority over other names for Chilean myxinids. Bdellostoma stoutii was designated as type species of Polistotrema Gill. The validity of the Western Atlantic Myxine limosa as distinct from the Eastern Atlantic Myxine glutinosa was confirmed.

  • 102. Finch, Brian W.
    et al.
    Hatfield, R. Stratton
    Colombo, Silvia
    Kennedy, Adam S.
    te Raa, Marije
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    de Swardt, Dawid H.
    Grosel, Joe
    Engelbrecht, Derek
    Cohen, Callan
    Olsson, Urban
    Donald, Paul F.
    Njoroge, Peter
    Frahnert, Sylke
    de Knijf, Peter
    Alström, Per
    Disjunct resident population of Melodious Lark Mirafra cheniana discovered in East Africa2022In: Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 2193-7192, E-ISSN 2193-7206, Vol. 164, no 1, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 103. Fjeldså, Jon
    et al.
    Alström, Per
    Olsson, Urban
    Cibois, Alice
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chapter 11 Superfamily Sylvioidea: the Old World warblers and their allies.2020In: The Largest Avian Radiation. The Evolution of Perching Birds or the Order Passeriformes, Barcelona: Lynx Edicions , 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bestämningsbok för parasitsteklar: Brock, J.P. 2017. The Banchine wasps (Ichneumonidae: Banchinae) of the British Isles2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 138, no 3-4, p. 227-229Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 105.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gabriel Marklin och entomologien: Med anledning av en biografi2017In: Skörvnöpparn, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 106.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Varför var de gamla entomologerna swedenborgare?2017In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 109-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the decades surrounding the turn of the century 1800, several of the leading entomolo- gists in Sweden were also involved in Christian sects following the doctrines of Emanuel Swedenborg. This has often been noted by historians, but only occasionally by entomolo- gists, and has never been subjected to closer study.

    This paper sketches the history of Swedenborgian entomology in Sweden, from natural history students in Skara in the 1780s, over the utopian plans connected with the Swedish involvement in the colonial adventure in West Africa, to the Linnaean and Swedenborgian societies in Gotland and Stockholm, the coleopterist stronghold on the plain of Västergöt- land, and eventually to a last survivor in Fåhraeus’s old days.

    The two early key figures both came from Västergötland, Adam Afzelius and Leonard Gyllenhal. In the African adventure, the naturalists inspired by Swedenborg were Afzelius and Anders Sparrman. Gotland became a stronghold where Pehr Hemming Odhner and Gustaf J Billberg tutored Olof I Fåhraeus. In the Swedenborgian circles in Stockholm, Billberg, Carl Johan Schönherr and Carl E Deléen were prominent. Then Gyllenhal and Schönherr were both in Västergötland and Fåhraeus in Göteborg. Short biographies of these persons are given and their interconnections laid out.

    The Linnaean perspective on nature had one of its cornerstone in a religious sense of wonder when facing nature, which is known as physico-theology. In the generation after Linnaeus, some prominent naturalists turned away from wonder and speculation, in paral- lel with ongoing enlightenment campaigns against superstition. Especially in the tradi- tional academic natural history environments in Uppsala and Lund there was a reaction with many people turning to the new ideas of ”romantic biology” or ”Naturphilosophie” in Oken’s sense. Whereas in the non-academy-based, more bourgeois and amateur, natural history circles in Stockholm, in Västergötland and eventually in Göteborg, the maintaining of the sense of wonder in Linnaeanism seems to have fit better with the Swedenborgian movement and Swedenborg’s ideas

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  • 107.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vem samlade var under 1700- och 1800-talen?: Entomofaunistikens grundläggande och förutsättningar i Sverige, landskap för landskap.2020In: Skörvnöpparn Supplement, ISSN 2000-4397, no 5, p. 1-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 108.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bowdrey, Jeremy
    Broad, Gavin R
    Spooner, Brian M
    van Veen, Frank
    Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Cynipoidea.2017In: Biodiversity data journal, ISSN 1314-2828, no 5, article id e8049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The British and Irish checklist of Cynipoidea is revised, considerably updating the last complete checklist published in 1978. Disregarding uncertain identifications, 220 species are now known from Britain and Ireland, comprising 91 Cynipidae (including two established non-natives), 127 Figitidae and two Ibaliidae.

    NEW INFORMATION: One replacement name is proposed, Kleidotoma thomsoni Forshage, for the secondary homonym Kleidotoma tetratoma Thomson, 1861 (nec K. tetratoma (Hartig, 1841)).

  • 109.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Buffington, Matthew L
    Giorgini, Massimo
    Lue, Chia-Hua
    Formisano, Giorgio
    Cascone, Pasquale
    Driskell, Amy
    Guerrieri, Emilio
    Description of the aberrant Leptopilina lasallei n. sp., with an updated phylogeny of Leptopilina Förster (Hymenoptera: Figitidae: Eucoilinae)2020In: Journal of Natural History, ISSN 0022-2933, E-ISSN 1464-5262, Vol. 54, p. 565-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the search for native Asian parasitoids of Drosophila suzukii, the notorious spotted-wing Drosophila (SWD), an odd new species of Eucoilinae was discovered. Leptopilina lasallei sp. nov. is herein described and diagnosed relative to other eucoilines associated with drosophilid hosts. Morphologically, L. lasallei is somewhat aberrant within Leptopilina; phylogenetically, L. lasallei is sister group to the core Leptopilina. In the process of investigating L. lasallei, a de novo molecular phylogeny of Leptopilina was generated and is included here. The integrated approach used for the characterisation of L. lasallei, and the resulting phylogeny of Leptopilina, produced data useful to select parasitoid species for SWD biological control.

  • 110.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Buffington, Matthew L
    Liljeblad, Johan
    Tang, Chang-Ti
    van Noort, Simon
    World Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera): A Key to Higher- Level Groups2020In: Insect Systematics & Diversity, ISSN 2399-3421, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 1-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While much has been learned regarding the phylogeny and evolution of cynipoid wasps, clearly illustrated diagnostic tools and identification keys have remained stagnant. So too, where keys do exist, they are often to genus or species, and there are no user-friendly keys to groups such as tribes, subfamilies, or families. This state of affairs leaves a knowledge gap for non-specialists and slows future research on the group. To address this, we provide a fully illustrated key to the higher-level groups of world Cynipoidea. We also provide sum-maries of all higher-level taxa with updated generic lists, biological data, distribution, and literature resources. The dichotomous key presented here is complimented with a multi-entry matrix-based key, created in Lucid, and served on www.waspweb.org with online versions of the dichotomous keys also available.

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  • 111.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hanssen, Oddvar
    Staverløkk, Arnstein
    Platyceraphron Kieffer, 1906 (Hymenoptera, Megaspilidae) in the Nordic countries2016In: Norwegian Journal of Entomology, ISSN 1501-8415, E-ISSN 1894-0692, Vol. 63, p. 125-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Platyceraphron Kieffer, 1906 with the species P. muscidarum Kieffer, 1906 is reported as new to Norway, caught in traps at two different locations. An old Swedish record which seems to have been forgotten is reviewed and one recent Swedish record added. No records are known from Finland and Denmark. Platyceraphron are remarkably dorsoventrally flattened wasps, and have been reported as parasitoids of subcorticeous flies, mainly Lonchaeidae.

  • 112.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Krell, Frank-Thorsten
    Two exotic dynastines collected in Sweden (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae)2016In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 137, no 4, p. 147-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish records of two exotic rhinoceros beetles (Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae) are reported, namely the Mediterranean Temnorhynchus baal Reiche & Saulcy, 1856 from a sawdust pile in Hölö, Södertälje, and the South American Tomarus villosus (Burmeister, 1847) from grapes in a supermarket in Karlskoga. A few other examples are briefly discussed, as are the conditions for successful colonisation of imported scarab beetles.

  • 113.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nordlander, Göran
    The identity of figitid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea: Figitidae) of anthomyiid flies in conifer cones2018In: European Journal of Entomology, ISSN 1210-5759, E-ISSN 1802-8829, Vol. 115, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Larvae of Strobilomyia flies (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) are serious pests in conifer-seed orchards because they feed on the seed inside the cones. Figitid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea) of Strobilomyia larvae in conifer cones are commonly reported but under various generic names. It is argued here that, across the entire Holarctic region, these figitids belong to Amphithectus and perhaps also to Sarothrus (Figitinae), but not to Melanips (Aspicerinae), contrary to some reports. We conclude that the identity of the commonly found figitid associated with conifer cones (Larix and Picea) in Europe and Asia is Amphithectus austriacus (Tavares, 1928) comb. n. This is most likely considering the original description and the host association, although the type specimen of Seitneria austriaca Tavares, 1928 is lost. This species name takes priority over the recently described Amphithectus coriaceus Paretas-Martinez & Pujade-Villar, 2013. Seitneria Tavares, 1928 becomes a new junior synonym of Amphithectus Hartig, 1840, and Amphithectus coriaceus Paretas-Martinez & Pujade-Villar, 2013 becomes a new synonym of Amphithectus austriacus (Tavares, 1928) comb. n.

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  • 114.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nordlander, Göran
    Buffington, Matthew L
    Eucoilinae of North America: a revised catalog of genera and described species2013In: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington, ISSN 0013-8797, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 225-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an updated catalog of North American Eucoilinae, bearing little resemblance to previous regional catalogs, which have been lagging behind in the recent systematic work in the group. The current catalog comprises 34 genera, arranged in six tribes. Of these genera, 9 are represented wholly by unidentified or undescribed species in the region, while the other 25 include 108 species recorded from the region. In comparison with previous catalogs, 24 genera and 41 species are added, and 34 species-level names are recombined, while 7 genera, five subgenera and 11 species are removed from the list of North American taxa. A modern, phylogenetically stable and type-based classification is implemented, as well as a tribal classification. In terms of nomenclatural acts, 25 new combinations are made (one is a reinstatement of an old combination); four new genus-levels synonymies are made (Tetramerocera Ashmead junior synonym of Ganaspis Fo ̈rster, Bewelda Quinlan and Aporeucoela Kieffer junior synonyms of Hexacola Fo ̈rster, Pentaplastidia Weld junior synonym of Trybliographa Fo ̈rster); eight new species-level synonymies are made; two species names are removed from synonymy; one new replacement name given (Hexacola pennsylvanicus for Hexacola subaperta Kieffer 1907 nec (Kieffer 1901a)).

  • 115.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Den entomologiska verksamheten på RIksmuseet 1915-20132019In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 89-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief history of entomology at the Swedish Museum of Natural History for the period 1915-1923 is presented in chronicle form. The time circumscription has its background in a recent 100th anniversary of the current museum building, for which there was work on an anniversary book, which has not appeared, and this is based on a contribution originally intended for that book. It concerns primarily the Entomology department (which ended as a unit in 2013 when it was part of a fusion into a Zoology department) but also includes the Entomological Society of Stockholm to the extent it has been based at the museum, as well as insect-related work in other museum departments. The chronicle gives plenty of examples of research and researchers, other staff and routines, collection growth and management, collecting expeditions and publications, work environment issues and everyday life at the department.

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  • 116.
    Forshage, Mattias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vem var Sveriges första kvinnliga entomolog?2014In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 135, p. 187-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of who can be considered Sweden’s first female entomologist is not easy toanswer and depends a lot on criteria; here it leads to a more general survey of women in Swedish entomology. Several persons who are candidates for being considered entomologist pioneers are presented, and the conditions for women to engage in entomology are briefly discussed. Such candidates include the following persons. Queen Lovisa Ulrika, Linnaeus’ benefactor, had an insect collection. The first female member of the Entomological Society in Stockholm was Signe Nordenskjöld in 1892. While Cecilia Andersson seems to be the first independent, active female insect collector in Sweden, in the early 20th century. Ida Trotzig collected Lepidoptera in Japan for the Stockholm museum. At that time, preparator Signe Ramberg and illustrator Therese Ekblom at the Stockholm museum were the first female professional entomologists. Only later, the entomological societies included somewhat larger number of female entomologists, and the first woman to get a PhD in entomology in Sweden was Christine Dahl, who also became the first female entomologist full professor.

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  • 117. Forsten, A.
    et al.
    Fortelius, M.Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Björn Kurtén - a memorial volume1991Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 118. Fortelius, M.
    et al.
    Andrews, P.
    Bernor, R. L.
    Viranta, S.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Preliminary analysis of taxonomic diversity, turnover and provinciality in a subsample of large land mammals from the later Miocene of western Eurasia.1996In: Acta zoologica cracoviensia, Vol. 39, p. 167-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently reviewed the later Miocene (MN 6-13; ca 15-5 Ma ago) primates, hipparions, rhinocerotids, suoids and carnivores of Europe and the eastern Mediterranean. This work is still unpublished and analyses are underway, but a preliminary indication of some coarse patterns is given here for the sample consisting of the groups listed above: 1) There is a clear-cut difference between western and Central Europe on one hand and the eastern Mediterranean on the other. This is especially clear for species richness, which shows a rising trend throughout the Vallesian and earlier Turolian for the eastern regions and a falling trend for the western ones. 2) The major drops in species richness occurred between MN 6 and MN 7, between MN 9 and MN 10, and between MN 12 and MN 13. Of these, the "mid-Vallesian crisis" (MN 9-10) seems to have been entirely absent in the eastern Mediterranean, where species richness rose sharply during this interval. Correspondingly, the drop in MN 12-13, associated with the Messinian crisis, was predominantly an eastern phenomenon. 3) Taxon free analysis of body size and ecomorphology strongly supports the view that a diachronous opening up of the landscape from east to west took place in western Eurasia during the Astaracian and Vallesian. We postulate that the difference seen in faunal dynamics between east and west reflects habitat-related effects of this diachrony in response to the same global event of rapid physical change. 4) The early Turolian (MN 11) was characterized by high diversity and high faunal similarity, which both decreased during the later Turolian and ended with the Messinian crisis. 5) Despite highly uniform diversity and turnover patterns throughout the interval, western and Central Europe developed distinct ecological differences from about MN 10 onwards. These differences may have been associated with the persistence of closed habitats in Central Europe.

  • 119. Fortelius, M.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Andrews, P.
    Bernor, R. L.
    Gentry, A.
    Humphrey, L.
    Mittmann, H.-W.
    Viranta, S.
    Provinciality, diversity, turnover, and paleoecology in land mammal faunas of the later Miocene of western Eurasia1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 414-448Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 120. Gastineau, Romain
    et al.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Institut Systématique Évolution Biodiversité (ISYEB), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, EPHE, Université des Antilles, 57 rue Cuvier, CP 51, 75005 Paris, France.
    Tazerouti, Fadila
    Justine, Jean-Lou
    Morphological and molecular characterisation of Tristoma integrum Diesing, 1850 (Monogenea, Capsalidae), including its complete mitogenome2023In: Parasite, ISSN 1252-607X, E-ISSN 1776-1042, E-ISSN 1776-1042, Vol. 30, p. 16-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capsalids are monopisthocotylean monogenean parasites found on the skin and gills of fish. Capsalines (subfamily Capsalinae) are large-sized capsalids, parasitic on highly prized gamefish, and species of Tristoma parasitise only the gills of swordfish (Xiphias gladius). We obtained specimens of Tristoma integrum Diesing, 1850 from swordfish collected off Algeria in the Mediterranean Sea. Here, we describe the specimens, including the key systematics characters of dorsolateral body sclerites. One specimen was used for a next generation sequencing analysis but a part of it, including the sclerites, was mounted on a permanent slide, drawn, and deposited in a curated collection. We characterised the complete mitogenome, the ribosomal cluster (including 18S and 28S) and additional genes such as Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α) and Histone 3. We also retrieved molecular information from the host tissue present in the gut of the monogenean and provide the sequence of the complete rRNA cluster of the host, X. gladius. The mitogenome of T. integrum is 13 968 bp in length and codes for 12 protein, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA. Phylogenies of capsalids were generated from 28S sequences and concatenated mitochondrial protein-coding genes, respectively. In the 28S phylogeny, most subfamilies based on morphology were not found to be monophyletic, but the Capsalinae were monophyletic. In both phylogenies, the closest member to Tristoma spp. was a member of the Capsaloides. In an Appendix, we report the complex nomenclatural history of Tristoma Cuvier, 1817 and its species.

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    Bouguerche et al. 2023 Morphological and molecular characterisation of Tristoma integrum Diesing, 1850
  • 121. Geffen, Eli
    et al.
    Kam, Michael
    Hefner, Reuven
    Hersteinsson, Pall
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fuglei, Eva
    Noren, Karin
    Adams, Jennifer R.
    Vucetich, John
    Meier, Thomas J.
    Mech, L. D.
    vonHoldt, Bridgett M.
    Stahler, Daniel R.
    Wayne, Robert K.
    Kin encounter rate and inbreeding avoidance in canids2011In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 20, no 24, p. 5348-5358Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 122. Geffen, Eli
    et al.
    Waidyaratne, Sitara
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Angerbjoern, Anders
    Vila, Carles
    Hersteinsson, Pall
    Fuglei, Eva
    White, Paula A.
    Goltsman, Michael
    Kapel, Christian M. O.
    Wayne, Robert K.
    Sea ice occurrence predicts genetic isolation in the Arctic fox2007In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 16, no 20, p. 4241-4255Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 123. Gerdes, Klaas
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Megafauna of the German exploration licence area for seafloor massive sulphides along the Central and South East Indian Ridge (Indian Ocean)2021In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 9, p. 1-258, article id e69955Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Gharahkhani, Azadeh
    et al.
    Tarbiat Modares University.
    Pourjam, Ebrahim
    Tarbiat Modares University.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pedram, Majid
    Tarbiat Modares University.
    Phylogenetic relationships of Leptolaimus de Man, 1876 (Plectida: Leptolaimidae) with description of two new species from the Persian Gulf, Iran2021In: Nematology (Leiden. Print), ISSN 1388-5545, E-ISSN 1568-5411, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125. Gharbi, Kamilia
    et al.
    Bouguerche, Chahinez
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo
    Tazerouti, Fadila
    Redescription and Molecular Characterisation of Derogenes ruber Lühe, 1900 (Hemiuroidea: Derogenidae) from Chelidonichthys lastoviza (Scorpaeniformes: Triglidae) in the Western Mediterranean2024In: Acta Parasitologica, ISSN 1230-2821, E-ISSN 1896-1851, Vol. 69, no 309, p. 309-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Derogenes ruber Lühe, 1900, the type-species of the genus Derogenes Lühe, 1900, is a poorly known derogenid digenean. The original description of this species was not illustrated and aspects of the morphology of the parasite from the type-host remain scarce. Available records of this species were brief and/or lacked illustrations and were based on morphology alone. Additionally, molecular data for Derogenes spp. are warranted to untangle species complexes as they provide a better assessment of interspecifc genetic divergence.

    Methods: Derogenes ruber is redescribed based on newly collected specimens from the gall bladder of its type-host Chelidonichthys lastoviza (Bonnaterre, 1788) collected in the Western Mediterranean of the Algerian coast during 2017–2019 and molecular data are provided using a partial fragment of the nuclear 28S ribosomal RNA gene (28S rRNA), the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene.

    Results: We herein provide a detailed illustrated redescription and morphometric data of D. ruber from its type-host C. lastoviza. We report a new geographical record (of Algeria) for it. Derogenes ruber is also genetically characterised for the frst time. Species/lineages of Derogenes were recovered in fve strongly supported reciprocally monophyletic clades: (i) D. ruber from C. lastoviza of Algeria; (ii) D. lacustris from Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns) of Argentina; (iii) Lineage “D. varicus DV1” (D. varicus sensu stricto) from fsh hosts in the White and Barents seas and the North Sea; (iv) Lineage “D. varicus DV2” from mollusc hosts in the White Sea; and (v) Lineage “D. varicus DV3” from Eumicrotremus fedorovi Mandrytsa. in the Pacifc Ocean. Hence, comparison of the newly generated sequences with other available data for Derogenes species supports the distinction of D. ruber confrming its taxonomic status and helping assess interspecifc variation. Comparison of D. ruber with the closely related species Derogenes latus revealed overlaps in morphometric data and the validity of the latter species is questioned. Conclusion The combination of morphological and molecular data provided for D. ruber provides a frm foundation for further investigations of Derogenes spp. Although we do describe herein material of D. ruber from the type-host, given that the occurrence of a single Derogenes species in various hosts has been challenged by molecular data, and both D. lacustris and D. varicus sensu stricto had been genetically proven to occur in various hosts, D. ruber and D. latus may be indeed synonymous. Additional sequencing efort on Derogenes spp. will strengthen systematic comparative studies and evolutionary relationships within the Derogenidae in general.

  • 126. Gilles, A
    et al.
    Authier, M
    Ramirez-Martinez, N
    Araújo, H
    Blanchard, A
    Carlström, J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Eira, C
    Dorémus, G
    Fernández-Maldonado, C
    Geelhoed, SCV
    Kyhn, L
    Laran, S
    Nachtsheim, D
    Panigada, S
    Pigeault, R
    Sequeira, M
    Sveegaard, S
    Taylor, NL
    Owen, K
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Saavedra, C
    Vázquez-Bonales, JA
    Unger, B
    Hammond, PS
    Estimates of cetacean abundance in European Atlantic waters in summer 2022 from the SCANS-IV aerial and shipboard surveys2023Report (Other academic)
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  • 127. GLÜCK, FRANZISKA U.
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    BOCHERT, RALF
    ZETTLER, MICHAEL L.
    Brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) from the continental shelf off Angola and Namibia2012In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3475, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Goharimanesh, Mona
    et al.
    Department of Biology Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Mashhad Iran;Research Group Evolutionary Morphology of Vertebrates Ghent University Gent Belgium.
    Ghassemzadeh, Fereshteh
    Department of Biology Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Mashhad Iran.
    De Kegel, Barbara
    Research Group Evolutionary Morphology of Vertebrates Ghent University Gent Belgium.
    Van Hoorebeke, Luc
    UGCT ‐ Department of Physics and Astronomy Ghent University Gent Belgium.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mirshamsi, Omid
    Department of Biology Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Mashhad Iran.
    Adriaens, Dominique
    Research Group Evolutionary Morphology of Vertebrates Ghent University Gent Belgium.
    The evolutionary relationship between arm vertebrae shape and ecological lifestyle in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)2022In: Journal of Anatomy, ISSN 0021-8782, E-ISSN 1469-7580, Vol. 240, no 6, p. 1034-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 129. Goharimanesh, Mona
    et al.
    Mirshamsi, Omid
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ghassemzadeh, Fereshteh
    Adriaens, Dominique
    New data on brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) from the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea, Iran2021In: Iranian Journal of Animal Biosystematics (IJAB), ISSN 1735-434X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130. Goharimanesh, Mona
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Ghassemzadeh, Fereshteh
    Mirshamsi, Omid
    Adriaens, Dominique
    A methodological exploration to study 2D arm kinematics in Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata)2023In: Frontiers in Zoology, E-ISSN 1742-9994, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 131. Goharimanesh, Mona
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mirshamsi, Omid
    Ghassemzadeh, Fereshteh
    Adriaens, Dominique
    Interactive identification key to all brittle star families (Echinodermata; Ophiuroidea) leads to revised morphological descriptions2021In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 766, p. 1-63Article in journal (Refereed)
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    GoharimaneshetalEJT
  • 132. Gondim, Anne Isabelley
    et al.
    Pereira Dias, Thelma Lucia
    Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Redescription of Hemieuryale pustulata von Martens, 1867 (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea) based on Brazilian specimens, with notes on systematics and habitat association2015In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3925, no 3, p. 341-360Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133. Gouillieux, Benoit
    et al.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lebouazda, Zineb
    Casamajor, Marie-Noëlle de
    Huguenin, Ludovic
    Sartoretto, Stephanie
    Range extension and morphological variability of Ophioderma longicaudum (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) at the South-West Atlantic coast of France2024In: CBM - Cahiers de Biologie Marine, ISSN 0007-9723, E-ISSN 2262-3094, Vol. 65, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Granell-Ruiz, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norén, Karin
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Le Roux, Aliza
    Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of the Free State, Phuthaditjhaba, South Africa.
    Dalerum, Fredrik
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden;Research Unit of Biodiversity (UO-CSIC-PA), Spanish National Research Council, University of Oviedo, Mieres, Spain;Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Genetic variation between and within two populations of bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis Desmarest, 1822) in South Africa2021In: African Zoology, ISSN 1562-7020, E-ISSN 2224-073X, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 165-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on genetic variation within and among populations is relevant for a broad range of topics in biology. We use a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers to evaluate genetic variation within and between two populations of bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis Desmarest, 1822) in South Africa. The bat-eared fox is a small canid occurring in southern and eastern Africa. The species is currently not threatened with extinction, but a lack of information on genetic diversity has been identified as a deficit for its future conservation. We observed low to moderate genetic differentiation between the two geographically separated populations, but neither mitochondrial nor nuclear microsatellite markers suggested that there have been dispersal barriers between them. Similar genetic diversity within both populations was contrasted by interpopulational differences in relatedness variation among males and females. A high genetic relatedness within both populations, indicated by mitochondrial data, is likely caused by a common historical origin or a combination of species-specific social organization and environmental dispersal constraints. We call for further research on the genetic divergence of bat-eared fox populations as well as on the genetic consequences of interactions between environmental characteristics and social organization in this species.

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  • 135. Granquist, Sandra M
    et al.
    Esparza-Salas, Rodrigo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Hauksson, Erlingur
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Fish consumption of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in north western Iceland assessed by DNA metabarcoding and morphological analysis2018In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 136. Green, Jeremy
    et al.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Xenarthran tooth architecture and dietary adaptations from analyses of dental microstructure and microwear, with new data for the giant sloth Megatherium americanum (Megatheriidae)2015In: Journal of Mammalogy, ISSN 0022-2372, E-ISSN 1545-1542, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 645-657Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 137. Gustafson, Grey
    et al.
    Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Coleoptera: Gyrinidae, whirligig beetles, fandiorano2022In: The new natural history of Madagascar / [ed] Steven M. Goodman, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022, 1, p. 1034-1041Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 138. Haddad, Nizar Jamal
    et al.
    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai
    Petersen, Bent
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Blom, Nikolaj
    Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas
    Complete mitochondrial genome of the Oriental Hornet, Vespa orientalis F. (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)2017In: Mitochondrial DNA Part B: Resources, E-ISSN 2380-2359, Vol. 2, p. 139-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 139. Haenel, Quiterie
    Jondelius, Ulf (Contributor)
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sundberg, Per (Contributor)
    Bourlat, Sarah (Contributor)
    NGS-based biodiversity and community structure analysis of meiofaunal eukaryotes in shell sand from Hållö island, Smögen, and soft mud from Gullmarn Fjord, Sweden2017In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 5, article id e12731Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Haenel, Quiterie
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    sundberg, per
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Bourlat, Sarah
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    NGS-based biodiversity and community structure analysis of meiofaunal eukaryotes in shell sand from Hållö island, Smögen, and soft mud from Gullmarn Fjord, Sweden2017In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 141. Hambäck, Peter A.
    et al.
    Weingartner, Elisabeth
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Wirta, Helena
    Roslin, Tomas
    Spatial subsidies in spider diets vary with shoreline structure: Complementary evidence from molecular diet analysis and stable isotopes2016In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 8431-8439Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 142. Hamel, Jean-François
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Côté, David
    Casey, Kaitlin
    Penney, Heather D.
    Neves, Bárbara de Moura
    Mercier, Annie
    Range extension and first record of the deep-sea brittle star Ophiactis abyssicola (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) in Canadian waters2022In: Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, ISSN 0025-3154, E-ISSN 1469-7769, Vol. (2021) 101, no 8, p. 1181-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 143. Hansen, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Sun, Jiachen
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental Monitoring and Research.
    Bustnes, Jan Ove
    Eulaers, Igor
    Jaspers, Veerle L.B.
    Covaci, Adrian
    Eens, Marcel
    Bourgeon, Sophie
    A retrospective investigation of feather corticosterone in a highly contaminated white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) population2023In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 228, p. 115923-115923, article id 115923Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144. Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    et al.
    Kuhn, Brian F.
    Nalla, Shahed
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Berger, Lee R.
    A new species of fox from the Australopithecus sediba type locality, Malapa, South Africa2013In: Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, ISSN 0035-919X, E-ISSN 2154-0098, Vol. 68, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 1.977 Ma site of ‘Malapa’ (Gauteng, South Africa) has yielded important new fossils, including the type specimens of the new hominin species Australopithecus sediba. Recently, we reported the first Carnivora specimens to have been recovered from the site. That sample included members of Felidae, Herpestidae and Hyaenidae. That first report also included three associated small canid specimens (an M2, a rib and a posterior mandibular fragment including the P4, M1, coronoid, condylar and angular processes) that we attributed to Vulpes cf. V. chama. In this paper, we compare these specimens to a broad sample of modern and fossil foxes and conclude that these specimens are distinct enough to be referred to a new species, here described and named Vulpes skinneri.

  • 145. Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    De Ruiter, D. J.
    Berger, Lee R.
    Churchill, S. E.
    The Plio-Pleistocene ancestor of wild dogs, Lycaon sekowei n. sp.2010In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 84, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) occupy an ecological niche characterized by hypercarnivory and cursorial hunting. Previous interpretations drawn from a limited, mostly Eurasian fossil record suggest that the evolutionary shift to cursorial hunting preceded the emergence of hypercarnivory in the Lycaon lineage. Here we describe 1.9–1.0 ma fossils from two South African sites representing a putative ancestor of the wild dog. The holotype is a nearly complete maxilla from Coopers Cave, and another specimen tentatively assigned to the new taxon, from Gladysvale, is the most nearly complete mammalian skeleton ever described from the Sterkfontein Valley, Gauteng, South Africa. The canid represented by these fossils is larger and more robust than are any of the other fossil or extant sub-Saharan canids. Unlike other purported L. pictus ancestors, it has distinct accessory cusps on its premolars and anterior accessory cuspids on its lower premolars–a trait unique to Lycaon among living canids. However, another hallmark autapomorphy of L. pictus, the tetradactyl manus, is not found in the new species; the Gladysvale skeleton includes a large first metacarpal. Thus, the anatomy of this new early member of the Lycaon branch suggests that, contrary to previous hypotheses, dietary specialization appears to have preceded cursorial hunting in the evolution of the Lycaon lineage. We assign these specimens to the taxon Lycaon sekowei n. sp.

  • 146.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Havsörn. Från akut hotad – nu stabiliseras beståndet i Stockholms skärgård2014In: Levande Skärgårdsnatur, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 147.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Naturlig påverkan av havsörn2014In: Vår Fågelvärld, Vol. 73, p. 48-50-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 148.
    Hempel, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Universität Potsdam, Evolutionary Adaptive Genomics, Germany.
    Bibi, Faysal
    Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany.
    Faith, J. Tyler
    Natural History Museum of Utah, University of Utah, USA.
    Brink, James S.
    National Museum Bloemfontein, Republic of South Africa.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kamminga, Pepijn
    Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Paijmans, Johanna L. A.
    Department of Genetics and Genome Biology, University of Leicester, UK.
    Westbury, Michael V.
    Section for Evolutionary Genomics, The GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hofreiter, Michael
    Universität Potsdam, Evolutionary Adaptive Genomics, Germany.
    Zachos, Frank E.
    Natural History Museum Vienna, Austria.
    Identifying the true number of specimens of the extinct blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus)2021In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 11, no 2100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Native to southern Africa, the blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus) is the only large African mammal species known to have become extinct in historical times. However, it was poorly documented prior to its extinction ~ 1800 AD, and many of the small number of museum specimens attributed to it are taxonomically contentious. This places limitations on our understanding of its morphology, ecology, and the mechanisms responsible for its demise. We retrieved genetic information from ten of the sixteen putative blue antelope museum specimens using both shotgun sequencing and mitochondrial genome target capture in an attempt to resolve the uncertainty surrounding the identification of these specimens. We found that only four of the ten investigated specimens, and not a single skull, represent the blue antelope. This indicates that the true number of historical museum specimens of the blue antelope is even smaller than previously thought, and therefore hardly any reference material is available for morphometric, comparative and genetic studies. Our study highlights how genetics can be used to identify rare species in natural history collections where other methods may fail or when records are scarce. Additionally, we present an improved mitochondrial reference genome for the blue antelope as well as one complete and two partial mitochondrial genomes. A first analysis of these mitochondrial genomes indicates low levels of maternal genetic diversity in the ‘museum population’, possibly confirming previous results that blue antelope population size was already low at the time of the European colonization of South Africa.

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  • 149. Herfindal, Ivar
    et al.
    Linnell, John D. C.
    Elmhagen, Bodil
    Andersen, Roy
    Eide, Nina E.
    Frafjord, Karl
    Henttonen, Heikki
    Kaikusalo, Asko
    Mela, Matti
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Strand, Olav
    Landa, Arild
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Population persistence in a landscape context: the case of endangered arctic fox populations in Fennoscandia2010In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 932-941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    7.16 Order Plectida Gadea, 19732014In: Gastrotricha, Cycloneuralia, Gnathifera: Volume 2: Nematoda / [ed] A. Schmidt-Rhaesa, Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 487-535Chapter in book (Refereed)
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