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  • 1851.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    The life of René Malaise: from the wild east to a sunken island2011In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3127, p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review is presented of the life of the Swedish entomologist René Malaise (1892–1978), the inventor of the “Malaisetrap” and one of the most important 20th Century specialists on sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta)

  • 1852.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hovmöller, Rasmus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gallstekeln- en mästerlig manipulatör2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan en liten insekt manipulera ett stort träd till att bygga ett hus

    fyllt med mat till sin avkomma? Den gåtan finns ännu inget svar på. Men

    genom att studera gallsteklar kan man i alla fall börja få förståelse för dessa

    mästerliga manipulatörers spännande liv.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-01 11:54
  • 1853. Wacey, David
    et al.
    Brasier, Martin
    Parnell, John
    Culwick, Timothy
    Bowden, Stephen
    Spinks, Sam
    Boyce, Adrian J
    Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett
    Jeon, Heejin
    Saunders, Martin
    Kilburn, Matt R
    Contrasting microfossil preservation and lake chemistries within the 1200–1000 Ma Torridonian Supergroup of NW Scotland2017In: Geological Society, London, Special Publications, Vol. 448, no 1, p. 105-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1854.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Espeland, Marianne
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Seven new species of Chimarra (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) from Malawi2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3796, no 3, p. 579-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time species of caddisflies in the genus Chimarra Stephens 1829 are reported from Malawi. The following new species are described: Chimarra zombaensis, C. flaviseta, C. chichewa, C. circumverta, C. mulanjae, C. psittacus and C. calidopectoris. The descriptions add to the knowledge of Afrotropical diversity in the order Trichoptera.

  • 1855.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Molecular phylogenetics reveals novel relationships within Empidoidea (Diptera)2018In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 43, p. 619-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empidoidea represent a large and diverse superfamily of true flies, and to date no stable hypothesis on the phylogeny exists. Previous classifications have been based on morphological data and the relationships among several groups are still unknown. Using the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) and cytochrome β (Cytβ) and the nuclear genes carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary (CAD), elongation factor‐1α (EF‐1α) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in a Bayesian analysis, we tested the support of higher taxonomic groups within this large superfamily of flies. We re‐evaluated previous hypotheses of evolution within the group and present a highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis. Atelestidae, Dolichopodidae, Empididae and Hybotidae were supported as monophyletic families, with Atelestidae as sister group to the remaining Empidoidea. Within the family Hybotidae, Bicellariinae stat.n. formed the sister group to the other subfamilies. The family Ragadidae stat.n. is established to include the subfamily Ragadinae and the new subfamily Iteaphilinae subfam.n.; Ragadidae was sister group to the Empididae. Dolichopodidae was found to form a sister group to Ragadidae plus Empididae. Within Empididae, Hemerodromiinae was found to be a nonmonophyletic group. The tribes Hilarini and Hemerodromiini stat. rev. were recovered as sister groups, as were Empidini and Chelipodini stat. rev. The former family Brachystomatidae was found to be nested within Empididae. A revised classification and diagnoses of nondolichopodid families, subfamilies and tribes are provided.

  • 1856. Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    The age, ancestral distribution and radiation of Chimarra (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) using molecular methods2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract
  • 1857. Wallin, Henrik
    et al.
    Kvamme, Torstein
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    To be or not to be a subspecies: description of Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) developing in downy willow (Salix lapponum L.)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 691, p. 103-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A new subspecies of the European cerambycid Saperda populnea (Linnaeus, 1758) is described: Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. based on specimens from Scandinavia. The male genitalia characters were examined and found to provide support for this separation, as well as differences in morphology, geographical distribution and bionomy. The preferred host tree for the nominate subspecies S. populnea populnea is Populus tremula L., whereas S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. is considered to be monophagous on Salix lapponum L. DNA sequence data of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was generated from Scandinavian specimens of S. populnea populnea and specimens representing S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. The two subspecies were not reciprocally monophyletic and genetic distances in COI were small. All synonyms of S. populnea populnea have been considered, and species similar to S. populnea populnea have been examined, and not found to be related to S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. A male lectotype has been designated for each of the two following synonyms: Cerambyx decempunctatus De Geer, 1775, and Saperda salicis Zetterstedt, 1818. The synonymised species from Asia, S. balsamifera (Motshulsky, 1860), is elevated to subspecies: S. populnea balsamifera stat. n. We end with a discussion on the definition of subspecies under the unified species concept.

  • 1858.
    Wallménius, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Jaenson, Thomas GT
    Medical Entomology Unit, Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Salanek, Erik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Spotted fever Rickettsia species in Hyalomma and Ixodes ticks infesting migratory birds in the European Mediterranean area2014In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1859. Wang, R
    et al.
    Richards, J
    Jeon, Heejin
    Apatite Sulfur Isotopes Trace Mantle-Input S for Giant Qulong Porphyry Deposit Formation in Continental Collision Zone2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1860. Wang, Rui
    et al.
    Jeon, Heejin
    Evans, Noreen J
    Archaean hydrothermal fluid modified zircons at Sunrise Dam and Kanowna Belle gold deposits, Western Australia: Implications for post-magmatic fluid activity and ore genesis2018In: American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, no 12, p. 1891-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1861. Wang, Rui
    et al.
    Tafti, Reza
    Hou, Zeng-qian
    Shen, Zhi-chao
    Guo, Na
    Evans, Noreen J
    Jeon, Heejin
    Li, Qiu-yun
    Li, Wei-kai
    Across-arc geochemical variation in the Jurassic magmatic zone, Southern Tibet: Implication for continental arc-related porphyry CuAu mineralization2017In: Chemical Geology, Vol. 451, p. 116-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1862. Wang, Xianghua
    et al.
    Buyck, Bart
    Verbeken, Annemieke
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Revisiting the morphology and phylogeny of Lactifluus with three new lineages from southern China2015In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1863.
    Wanntorp, Livia
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grudinski, Melanie
    Forster, Paul
    Muellner-Riehl, Alexandra N.
    Grimm, Guido W.
    Wax plants (Hoya, Apocynaceae) evolution: epiphytism drives successfull radiation2014In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Taxon, Vol. 63, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1864. Ward, D.
    et al.
    Bischoff, A.
    Roszjar, J.
    Berndt, J.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Trace element inventory of meteoritic Ca-phosphates.2017In: American Mineralogist, ISSN 0003-004X, E-ISSN 1945-3027, Vol. 102, p. 1856-1880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most extraterrestrial samples feature the two accessory Ca-phosphates (apatite-group minerals and merrillite), which are important carrier phases of the rare earth elements (REE). The trace-element concentrations (REE, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Hf, Ta, Pb, Th, and U) of selected grains were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and/or SIMS (REE only). This systematic investigation includes 99 apatite and 149 merrillite analyses from meteorites deriving from various asteroidal bodies including 1 carbonaceous chondrite, 8 ordinary chondrites, 3 acapulcoites, 1 winonaite, 2 eucrites, 5 shergottites, 1 ureilitic trachyandesite, 2 mesosiderites, and 1 silicate-bearing IAB iron meteorite.Although Ca-phosphates predominantly form in metamorphic and/or metasomatic reactions, some are of igneous origin. As late-stage phases that often incorporate the vast majority of their host’s bulk REE budget, the investigated Ca-phosphates have REE enrichments of up to two orders of magnitude compared to the host rock’s bulk concentrations. Within a single sample, each phosphate species displays a uniform REE-pattern, and variations are mainly restricted to their enrichment, therefore indicating similar formation conditions. Exceptions are brecciated samples, i.e., the Adzhi-Bogdo (LL3-6) ordinary chondrite. Despite this uniformity within single samples, distinct meteorite groups do not necessarily have unique REE-patterns. Four basic shapes dominate the REE patterns of meteoritic Ca-phosphates: (1) flat patterns, smoothly decreasing from La-Lu with prominent negative Eu anomalies (acapulcoites, eucrites, apatite from the winonaite and the ureilitic trachyandesite, merrillite from ordinary chondrites); (2) unfractionated patterns, with only minor or no anomalies (mesosiderites, enriched shergottites, IAB-iron meteorite); (3) LREE-enriched patterns, with either positive or slightly negative Eu anomalies (chondritic apatite); and (4) strongly LREE-depleted patterns, with negative Eu anomalies (depleted shergottites). The patterns do not correlate with the grade of metamorphism (petrologic type), specific adjacent mineral assemblages or with Ca-phosphate grain size. Neither the proportions of different REE, nor particular REE patterns themselves are universally correlated to a specific formation mechanism yet Eu (i.e., magnitude of the Eu anomaly) is a sensitive indicator to evaluate the timing of plagioclase and phosphate crystallization. Based on our data, U and Th abundances in apatite increase (almost linearly) with the grade of metamorphism, as well as with the differentiation of their host rock.

  • 1865.
    Warén, A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rouse, G.W.
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.
    A new genus and species of Cataegidae (Gastropoda; Seguenzioidea) from eastern Pacific Ocean methane seeps.2016In: NovApex, Vol. 17, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1866.
    Warén, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Har någon träffat på den här lilla snäckan?2014In: Fauna och Flora, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 40-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    No

  • 1867.
    Warén, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Takano, Tsuyoshi
    Kano, Yasunori
    Megadenus atrae n. sp., an endoparasitic eulimid gastropod (Mollusca) from the black sea cucumber Holothuria atra Jaeger (Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae) in the Indo-West Pacific2017In: Systematic Parasitology, ISSN 0165-5752, E-ISSN 1573-5192, Vol. 94, p. 699-709Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1868.
    Warén, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Valdés, Angel
    Gosliner, Terrence M.
    A new species of Parvaplustrum Powell, 1951 (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia, Aplustridae, from the northeastern Pacific.2017In: The Nautilus, ISSN 0028-1344, Vol. 131, p. 97-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1869.
    Watenphul, Anke
    et al.
    University of Hamburg.
    Schlüter, Jochen
    University of Hamburg.
    Bosi, Ferdinando
    University of Rome "La Sapienza".
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Malcherek, Thomas
    University of Hamburg.
    Influence of the octahedral cationic-site occupancies on the framework vibrations of Li-free tourmalines, with implications for estimating temperature and oxygen fugacity in host rocks2016In: American Mineralogist, ISSN 0003-004X, E-ISSN 1945-3027, Vol. 101, p. 2554-2563Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1870.
    Weaver, Patricia
    et al.
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lawver, Daniel R.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA.
    Tacker, Christopher
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, USA.
    Ciampaglio, Charles N.
    Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Celina, Ohio, USA.
    Crate, Jon M.
    Analytical Chemistry, FAI Materials Testing Lab Incorporated, Marietta, Georgia, USA.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.
    Characterization of Organics Consistent with b-Chitin Preserved in the Late Eocene Cuttlefish Mississaepia mississippiensis.2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1544-9173, EISSN 1545-7885, ISSN ISSN 1544-9173, EISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 6, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preservation of original organic components in fossils across geological time is controversial, but the potential such molecules have for elucidating evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships is invaluable. Chitin is one such molecule. Ancient chitin has been recovered from both terrestrial and marine arthropods, but prior to this study had not been recovered from fossil marine mollusks.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: Organics consistent with b-chitin are recovered in cuttlebones of Mississaepia mississippiensis from the Late Eocene (34.36 million years ago) marine clays of Hinds County, Mississippi, USA. These organics were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (Hyperprobe), Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Conclusions/Significance: Our study presents the first evidence for organics consistent with chitin from an ancient marine mollusk and discusses how these organics have been degraded over time. As mechanisms for their preservation, we propose that the inorganic/organic lamination of the cuttlebone, combined with a suboxic depositional environment with available free Fe2+ ions, inhibited microbial or enzymatic degradation.

  • 1871.
    Weaver, Patricia
    et al.
    North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
    Doguzhaeva, Larisa
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lawver, Daniel
    Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, United States of America.
    Tacker, Christopher
    Research and Collections, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America.
    Ciampaglio, Charles
    Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Celina, Ohio, United States of America.
    Crate, Jon
    Analytical Chemistry, FAI Materials Testing Lab Incorporated, Marietta, Georgia,United States of America.
    Zheng, Wenxia
    Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America.
    Characterization of Organics Consistent with b-Chitin Preserved in the Late Eocene Cuttlefish Mississaepia mississippiensis2011In: PlosOne www.plosone.org, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 1-9, article id e28195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preservation of original organic components in fossils across geological time is controversial, but the potential such molecules have for elucidating evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships is invaluable. Chitin is one such molecule. Ancient chitin has been recovered from both terrestrial and marine arthropods, but prior to this study had not been recovered from fossil marine mollusks. Methodology/Principal Findings: Organics consistent with b-chitin are recovered in cuttlebones of Mississaepia mississippiensis from the Late Eocene (34.36 million years ago) marine clays of Hinds County, Mississippi, USA. These organics were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (Hyperprobe), Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Conclusions/Significance: Our study presents the first evidence for organics consistent with chitin from an ancient marine mollusk and discusses how these organics have been degraded over time. As mechanisms for their preservation, we propose that the inorganic/organic lamination of the cuttlebone, combined with a suboxic depositional environment with available free Fe2+ ions, inhibited microbial or enzymatic degradation.

    2+ ions, inhibited microbial or enzymatic degradation.

  • 1872. Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Genetic data, reproduction season and reproductive strategy support the existence of biological species in Ophioderma longicauda2014In: Comptes rendus. Biologies, ISSN 1631-0691, E-ISSN 1768-3238, Vol. 337, p. 553-560Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1873. Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Chenuil, Anne
    Species delimitation in the presence of strong incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization: lessons from Ophioderma(Ophiuroidea: Echinodermata)2019In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 131, p. 138-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1874.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Anders Tehler (Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm) retires2015In: International Lichenological Newsletter, Vol. 48, p. 10-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1875.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Mason E. Hale award - Tami McDonald2014In: International Lichenological Newletter, Vol. 47, p. 5-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1876.
    Wedin, Mats
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Maier, S.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Cronholm, Bodil
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Westberg, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grube, Martin
    Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens2016In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 18, p. 1428-1439Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1877.
    Wedin, Mats
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Otálora, Monica A.G.
    Jørgensen, Per M.
    The genus Paracollema validated (Collemataceae, Peltigerales, Lecanoromycetes)2017In: Studies in Fungi, ISSN 2465-4973, p. 208-209Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1878.
    Wedin, Mats
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Zamora, J.C.
    Millanes, A.M.
    Phaeotremella foliacea comb. nov. (Tremellales, Tremellomycetes, Agaricomycotina).2016In: Mycosphere, ISSN 2077-7000, E-ISSN 2077-7019, Vol. 7, p. 295-296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1879. Weerakoon, G.
    et al.
    Aptroot, A
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Leightoniella zeylanensis belongs to the Pannariaceae2018In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, article id e01880Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1880.
    Weis, Franz
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Henrik, Skogby ()
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Stalder, Roland
    University of Innsbruck.
    Nemchin, Alexander
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Water content in the Martian mantle: A Nakhla perspective2017In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 212, p. 84-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1881.
    Weis, Franz A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Troll, Valentin R.
    Uppsala University.
    Deegan, Frances M.
    Uppsala University.
    Dahren, Börje
    Uppsala University.
    Magmatic water contents determined through clinopyroxene: Examples from the Western Canary Islands, Spain2015In: Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, ISSN 1525-2027, E-ISSN 1525-2027, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 2127-2146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a key parameter in magma genesis, magma evolution, and resulting eruption styles,because it controls the density, the viscosity, as well as the melting and crystallization behavior of a melt. Theparental water content of a magma is usually measured through melt inclusions in minerals such as olivine, amethod which may be hampered, however, by the lack of melt inclusions suitable for analysis, or postentrapmentchanges in their water content. An alternative way to reconstruct the water content of a magma is touse nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs), such as pyroxene, which take up low concentrations of hydrogenas a function of the magma’s water content. During magma degassing and eruption, however, NAMs maydehydrate. We therefore tested a method to reconstruct the water contents of dehydrated clinopyroxene phenocrystsfrom the Western Canary islands (n=28) through rehydration experiments followed by infrared andM€ossbauer spectroscopy. Employing currently available crystal/melt partitioning data, the results of the experimentswere used to calculate parental water contents of 0.71±0.07 to 1.49±0.15 wt % H2O for WesternCanary magmas during clinopyroxene crystallization at upper mantle conditions. This H2O range is in agreementwith calculated water contents using plagioclase-liquid-hygrometry, and with previously published datafor mafic lavas from the Canary Islands and comparable ocean island systems elsewhere. Utilizing NAMs incombination with hydrogen treatment can therefore serve as a proxy for pre-eruptive H2O contents, which weanticipate becoming a useful method applicable to mafic rocks where pyroxene is the main phenocryst phase.

  • 1882.
    Weis, Franz
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lazor, Peter
    Uppsala universitet.
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Stalder, Roland
    University of Innsbruck.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Stockholms universitet.
    Polarized IR and Raman spectra of zoisite: insights into the OH-dipole orientation and luminescence.2016In: European journal of mineralogy, ISSN 0935-1221, E-ISSN 1617-4011, Vol. 28, p. 537-543Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1883.
    Weis, Franz
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Ros, Linus
    Reichart, Patrick
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Dollinger, Gunther
    Hydrogen concentration analysis in clinopyroxene using proton–proton scattering analysis2018In: Physics and chemistry of minerals, ISSN 0342-1791, E-ISSN 1432-2021, Vol. 45, p. 669-678Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1884.
    Weis, Franz
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lazor, Peter
    Uppsala universitet.
    Hydrogen analysis in nominally anhydrous minerals by transmission Raman spectroscopy2018In: Physics and chemistry of minerals, ISSN 0342-1791, E-ISSN 1432-2021, Vol. 45, p. 597-607Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1885.
    Weis, Franz
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Stalder, Roland
    University of Innsbruck.
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Experimental hydration of natural volcanic clinopyroxene phenocrysts under hydrothermal pressures (0.5 – 3 kbar)2016In: American Mineralogist, ISSN 0003-004X, E-ISSN 1945-3027, Vol. 101, p. 2233-2247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1886.
    Wells, Alice
    et al.
    Australian National Insect Collection, CSIRO.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Micro-caddisfly faunas of Australia and the southwest Pacific(Trichoptera, Hydroptilidae)2016In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 10, p. 439-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's distributions of faunal groups reflect historic events—geological and evolutionary, as well as dispersals, extinctionsand chance events. The extent to which each of these contributed to the hydroptilid faunas of mainland Australia,Tasmania, New Guinea, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Fiji and Vanuatu is explored by comparison of the faunal composition,geology and geography of Australia and these SW Pacific islands. Corroborative evidence is sought from othergroups, flora as well as fauna.

  • 1887. Wells, Alice
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Review of New Caledonian species of Oxyethira Eaton,with description of 17 new species, and new recordsfor Hydroptila Dalman and Hellyethira Neboiss(Trichoptera, Hydroptilidae).2015In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 530, p. 37-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New Caledonian representation of the cosmopolitan genus Oxyethira Eaton is reviewed, with the descriptionof new species bringing to 26 the total for the genus on the island. The species are referred to threesubgenera: Trichoglene Neboiss (11 species), Pacificotrichia Kelley (13 species) and Dampfitrichia Ulmer(one species) and one species is unplaced to subgenus. A key is provided to Oxyethira species of New Caledonia.In addition, new records are given for two otherwise Australian species, Hydroptila losida Moselyand Hellyethira malleoforma Wells. Points marked on a series of small maps of New Caledonia indicate thesite or sites at which the species were collected. This final paper in a series of generic revisions brings thehydroptilid fauna of the island of New Caledonia to 60 species, distributed in six genera.

  • 1888. Wells, Alice
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Review of the New Caledonian species of Acritoptila Wells, 1982 (Trichoptera, Insecta), with descriptions of 3 new species2014In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 397, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1889. Wennerstrom, Lovisa
    et al.
    Ryman, Nils
    Tison, Jean-Luc
    Hasslow, Anna
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Laikre, Linda
    Genetic landscape with sharp discontinuities shaped by complex demographic history in moose (Alces alces)2016In: Journal of Mammalogy, ISSN 0022-2372, E-ISSN 1545-1542, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The moose (Alces alces) is the most intensely managed game species in Fennoscandia; approximately one-third of the population, ca. 160,000 animals, is harvested annually. Despite the species' biological and socioeconomic importance, there are knowledge gaps with respect to its intraspecific diversity and genetic structure. Recent studies of moose in neighboring countries report 2 genetic groups in Finland, 3 in Norway with one of them suggested to be of ancient origin, and no indications of bottlenecks. To delineate the spatial genetic landscape of the Swedish moose, we used allozyme variability from over 20,000 georeferenced moose collected all over Sweden in combination with 12 microsatellites (n = 1,200) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (n = 44). We combined individual-based and traditional statistical approaches with coalescence-based simulations. The results indicate a complex history with bottlenecks and recent expansions that is consistent with historical records. Swedish moose are separated into 2 major genetic groups, a northern and a southern one, where the southern group is further divided into 3 subgroups. The 2 main subpopulations are moderately differentiated (F-ST = 0.1; R-ST = 0.07) and separated by sharp genetic discontinuities occurring over a relatively narrow transition zone in central Sweden that coincides with a similar, previously reported transition zone in Norway. This differentiation is not reflected in mtDNA variation, where no significant divergence was observed. Together with the F-ST andR(ST) similarities, this suggests that the 2 major subpopulations in Sweden reflect divergence shaped after the postglacial recolonization of Scandinavia. Neighborhood size assessments indicate that gene flow is relatively restricted with an estimated average dispersal distance of 3.5-11.1 km, and spatial autocorrelograms suggest that genetic similarity decreases almost linearly over space resulting in continuous genetic clines within major subgroups. Management areas largely coincide with genetic clusters, simplifying the integration of genetic information into management.

  • 1890.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new chimaeroid fish from the Cretaceous of Lebanon1986In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 19, p. 393-397Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1891.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new genus and species of Felidae (Mammalia) from Rusinga Island, Kenya, with notes on early Felidae of Africa2011In: Estudios Geologicos, ISSN 0367-0449, E-ISSN 1988-3250, Vol. 67, p. 217-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Miocene (Burdigalian) deposits of the Hiwegi Fm., Rusinga Island, Kenya, have yielded a single specimen of a small felid. This specimen, here identified as the holotype of a new genus and species, is of the size of the smallest living Felidae. It shows some features of primitive, “Pseudaelurus-grade” cats, but also features of both morphology and metrics that are intermediate between this grade and modern Felidae, suggesting a transitional taxon. This is in contrast with Diamantofelis and Namafelis from Namibia, which, though aberrant, are more clearly of “Pseudaelurus-grade”. The Rusinga specimen is the most derived felid specimen of the lower Miocene.

  • 1892.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bibymalagasia (Mammalia Incertae sedis)2010In: Cenozoic Mammals of Africa / [ed] Werdelin, L. & Sanders, W. J., Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010, p. 113-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1893.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Biogeographic relationships of African carnivoran faunas 7-1.2 Ma.2008In: Comptes rendus. Palevol, ISSN 1631-0683, E-ISSN 1777-571X, Vol. 7, p. 645-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the carnivore component of African fossil faunas from three time slices: 7–5 Ma, 4–3 Ma, and 2.5–1.2 Ma, using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCO) of presence/absence data on genera. The faunas mostly cluster by time slice, with the exception of Laetoli (Tanzania) and Ahl al Oughlam (Morocco), which differ from all other faunas. The separation during the Late Miocene of a Chado–Libyan bioprovince from the remainder of Africa is supported. No such distinctions are present in the other time slices. Taxonomic distance is not generally correlated with geographic distance, though if Langebaanweg is removed from the 7–5 Ma time slice, the correlation at that time is significant. Comparison of these paleontological results with phylogeographic studies of modern species leads to some general comments on the analytic power of the fossil record with regard to interregional migrations.

  • 1894.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivoran ecomorphology: a phylogenetic perspective1996In: Carnivore Behavior, Ecology, and Evolution (Vol. II) / [ed] Gittleman, J. L., Cornell: Cornell University Press, 1996, p. 582-624Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1895.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivores, exclusive of Hyaenidae, of the later Miocene of Europe and Western Asia1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 271-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1896.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivores from the Kanapoi hominid site, Turkana Basin, northern Kenya2003In: Contributions in Science, Vol. 498, p. 115-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kanapoi is the earliest Pliocene site yet described in eastern Africa with a substantial carnivoran record. It includes eight species in as many genera, representing five families. The material is dominated by the hyaenid Parahyaena howelli n. sp., but also includes a new Enhydriodon  species, E. ekecaman, the lutrine cf. Torolutra sp., the felids Dinofelis petteri, Homotherium sp., and Felis sp., the herpestid Helogale sp., and the viverrid Genetta n. sp. The Kanapoi Carnivora includes the remains of the first post- Miocene radiation of endemic African Carnivora.

  • 1897.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Chronology of Neogene mammal localities2010In: Cenozoic Mammals of Africa / [ed] Werdelin, L. & Sanders, W. J., Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010, p. 27-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1898.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Circumventing a constraint: the case of Thylacoleo (Marsupialia: Thylacoleonidae)1989In: Australian Journal of Zoology, Vol. 36, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1899.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Community-wide character displacement in the lower carnassials of Late Miocene hyenas1996In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 29, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have found regularities in the pattern of distribution of dental parameters such as canine or carnassial length among sympatric carnivores. These regularities are taken to be indicative of community-wide character displacement. This study documents similar pattern in late Miocene and earliest Pliocene hyaenids from several localities in Eurasia and Africa. Statistical tests show ratios of lower carnassial total lengths and blade lengths between species to be suggestively equal among sympatric late Miocene hyaenas. Other measurements do not show this regular pattern. This finding mirrors that regarding modern canids in the Middle East, suggesting that a process leading to community-wide character displacement was in effect among these hyaenid taxa. Their response to this pattern suggests that they occupied a similarecological role to modern canids. The causal basis for such a process is unknown but is suggested to lie in direct interspecific competition between carnivores rather than being a response to regularly spaced features of the environment.

  • 1900.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Comparison of skull shape in marsupial and placental carnivores1986In: Australian Journal of Zoology, Vol. 34, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed)
35363738394041 1851 - 1900 of 2056
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