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  • 1851. Valdiosera, Cristina
    et al.
    Garcia, Nuria
    Dalen, Love
    Smith, Colin
    Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich
    Liden, Kerstin
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Typing single polymorphic nucleotides in mitochondrial DNA as a way to access Middle Pleistocene DNA2006In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 601-603Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1852.
    van de Kamp, Thomas
    et al.
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Schwermann, Achim H.
    LWL-Museum of Natural History, Sentruper Str. 285, 48141 Münster, Germany.
    dos Santos Rolo, Tomy
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Lösel, Philipp D.
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Engler, Thomas
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Etter, Walter
    Department of Geosciences, Natural History Museum Basel, Augustinergasse 2, 4051 Basel, Switzerland..
    Faragó, Tomáš
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Göttlicher, Jörg
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Heuveline, Vincent
    Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab (EMCL), Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 205, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kopmann, Andreas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Mähler, Bastian
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Odar, Janes
    Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation (IPS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-vonHelmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, German.
    Rust, Jes
    Steinmann Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Palaeontology, University of Bonn, Nußallee 8, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
    Tan Jerome, Nicholas
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Vogelgesang, Matthias
    Institute for Data Processing and Electronics (IPE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermannvon-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany.
    Baumbach, Tilo
    Laboratory for Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (LAS), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Krogmann, Lars
    Department of Entomology, State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Rosenstein 1, 70191 Stuttgart, Germany.
    Parasitoid biology preserved in mineralized fossils2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About 50% of all animal species are considered parasites. The linkage of species diversity to a parasitic lifestyle is especially evident in the insect order Hymenoptera. However, fossil evidence for host–parasitoid interactions is extremely rare, rendering hypotheses on the evolution of parasitism assumptive. Here, using high-throughput synchrotron X-ray microtomography, we examine 1510 phosphatized fly pupae from the Paleogene of France and identify 55 parasitation events by four wasp species, providing morphological and ecological data. All species developed as solitary endoparasitoids inside their hosts and exhibit different morphological adaptations for exploiting the same hosts in one habitat. Our results allow systematic and ecological placement of four distinct endoparasitoids in the Paleogene and highlight the need to investigate ecological data preserved in the fossil record.

  • 1853.
    van den Bosch, Matilda
    et al.
    United Nations Environment Programme.
    Telenius, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    UNEP/UNECE GEO-6 Assessment for the pan-European region.2016In: UNEP/UNECEGEO-6 Assessment for the pan-European region / [ed] van den Bosch, Matilda, Nairobi: UNEP/UNECE , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sixth Global Environment Outlook (GEO-6) Assessment for the pan-European region paints a comprehensive picture of the environmental factors contributing to human health and well-being at the regional level. Backed by a large body of recent, credible scientific evidence, regional-wide consultations and a robust intergovernmental process, the assessment demonstrates that regional and global multilateral environmental agreements have improved environmental conditions in the pan-European region. It also highlights the complexity of the interlinked environmental, social and economic challenges now confronting decision makers.

  • 1854. van der Meer, Q H A
    et al.
    Waight, T E
    Tulloch, A J
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andersen, T
    Magmatic Evolution during the Cretaceous Transition from Subduction to Continental Break-up of the Eastern Gondwana Margin (New Zealand) documented by in-situ Zircon O and €“Hf Isotopes and Bulk-rock Sr and €“Nd Isotopes2018In: Journal of Petrology, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 849-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major changes in tectonic style can lead to tapping of highly variable magma sources and potentially result in significant episodes of crustal growth. Here we focus on magmatism associated with a transition from arc magmatism to subsequent over-thickening and eventual orogenic collapse. This transition is associated with cessation of subduction and was followed by continental extension and finally continental break-up as recorded in the Cretaceous magmatic record of Zealandia. Orogenic collapse peaked at 110 Ma and is expressed through core complex formation and the intrusion of I- to evolved I/S-type Rahu Suite plutons that have widely varying chemical compositions but homogeneous whole-rock and zircon isotopic signatures that are intermediate between mantle and local upper crust values. The Rahu Suite is interpreted to be derived from differing degrees of melt extraction from a pre-existing lower crustal source and lacks a demonstrable juvenile component. This lower crustal source was likely formed by magmatic underplating and melt–crust hybridization during preceding arc volcanism (Separation Point and Darran suites), effectively smearing out a pulsed event of crust formation in the zircon record. Therefore, late orogenic I- and I/S-type suites do not have to equate to crustal growth and can be an expression of crustal re-melting. An abrupt change in magma sources in Zealandia occurred after 100 Ma during the onset of progressive crustal extension. A juvenile alkaline component (presumably derived from the lithospheric mantle) is suggested to have been present from >97 Ma. This component became more pronounced with time until the emplacement of granites and trachytes with isotopic signatures overlapping with coeval mafic mantle-derived dikes during bimodal rift-related magmatism. The juvenile alkaline component dictated the composition of the felsic magmas but did not represent a significant crustal growth event due to small total volumes.

  • 1855. van der Meer, Q.H.A.
    et al.
    Waight, T.E.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Andersen, T.
    Age and petrogenetic constraints on the lower glassy ignimbrite of the Mount Somers Volcanic Group, New Zealand2017In: New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, ISSN 0028-8306, E-ISSN 1175-8791, Vol. 60, p. 209-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mount Somers Volcanic Group (MSVG) forms a large (c. 18,000 km2) calc-alkaline volcanic complex on New Zealand’s Eastern Province. U–Pb secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) spot ages on zircon from the lower glassy ignimbrite in Rakaia Gorge reveal a bimodal distribution of 99.0 ± 0.5 and 96.3 ± 0.5 Ma (2σ). These ages are within error of previous (unpublished) zircon sensitive high resolution ion microprobe ages but have a precision that enables identification of two distinct episodes of zircon crystallisation, indicating magmatic activity over a period of at least 2.5 Ma. The younger age is interpreted to represent the emplacement age of the ignimbrite. The older age may originate from the assimilation of underlying ignimbrites or prolonged magma chamber processes. Combined O and Hf isotopes in zircon indicate that melt compositions for the c. 99 and c. 96 Ma magmatic episodes were very similar and intermediate between the local upper crust and mantle-derived melts, supporting formation through hybridisation of mantle and crustal-derived melts. MSVG magmatism preceded, coexisted with and was succeeded by local mafic alkaline HIMU-type magmatism (97.0 ± 0.5 Ma and younger) on the nearby Pahau Terrane. By contrast, the mafic component of the MSVG was derived from a depleted and potentially subduction-modified source associated with the Rakaia Terrane.

  • 1856. van der Valk, Tom
    et al.
    Durazo, Frida Lona
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Whole mitochondrial genome capture from faecal samples and museum-preserved specimens2017In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998, Vol. 17, no 6, p. e111-e121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1857. van der Valk, Tom
    et al.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Caillaud, Damien
    Ngobobo, Urbain
    Binyinyi, Escobar
    Nishuli, Radar
    Stoinski, Tara
    Gilissen, Emmanuel
    Sonet, Gontran
    Semal, Patrick
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dalén, Love
    Guschanski, Katerina
    Significant loss of mitochondrial diversity within the last century due to extinction of peripheral populations in eastern gorillas2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1858. Van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, JHA
    et al.
    Kustatscher, Evelyn
    Bauer, Kathleen
    Pott, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schmeissner, Stefan
    Dütsch, Günter
    Krings, Michael
    A Selaginellites from the Rhaetian of Wüstenwelsberg (Upper Franconia, Germany)2014In: Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen, ISSN 0077-7749, Vol. 272, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sterile shoots and a microsporangiate strobilus of a new herbaceous lycophyte, Selaginellites coburgensis nov. spec., are described from the Rhaetian (uppermost Triassic) of Wüstenwelsberg near Coburg, Germany. Shoots branch dichotomously and bear two lateral rows of larger and two median rows of smaller microphylls. Sporophylls are scale-like; sporangia contain Uvaesporites-type spores, which permit a direct comparison of macrofossil evidence with the dispersed spore record. Sellaginellites coburgensis is significant because lycophyte macrofossils are exceedingly rare in the Rhaeto-Liassic of Franconia. The plant probably grew in habitats that were shady and relatively humid, perhaps within dense vegetation and/or in close proximity to bodies of water that locally provided a favourable microclimate.

  • 1859. van Noort, Simon
    et al.
    Buffington, Matthew L
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Afrotropical Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera).2015In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 493, p. 1-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Afrotropical Cynipoidea are represented by 306 described species and 54 genera in four families: Cynipidae, Figitidae, Liopteridae and Ibaliidae, the latter represented by a single introduced species. Seven of these genera are only represented by undescribed species in the region. Seven new genus-level synonymies, one genus resurrected from synonymy, 54 new combinations, one combination reinstated, and one new replacement name are presented. We provide identification keys to the families, subfamilies and genera of cynipoid wasps occurring in the Afrotropical region (Africa south of the Sahara, including Madagascar and southern Arabian Peninsula). Online interactive Lucid Phoenix and Lucid matrix keys are available at: http://www.waspweb.org/Cynipoidea/Keys/index.htm. An overview of the biology and checklists of species for each genus are provided. This paper constitutes the first contributory chapter to the book on Afrotropical Hymenoptera.

  • 1860. van Noort, Simon
    et al.
    Buffington, Matthew L
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Review of Afrotropical Figitinae (Figitidae, Cynipoidea, Hymenoptera) with the first records of Neralsia and Lonchidia for the region.2014In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, no 453, p. 37-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cynipoid subfamily Figitinae is poorly represented in the Afrotropical region with two genera (Figites Latreille and Xyalophora Kieffer) and six species currently known. Here we record an additional two genera (Neralsia Cameron and Lonchidia Thomson) for the region and describe three new species: Neralsiahaddocki sp. n.; Xyalophoratedjoansi sp. n.; Xyalophoratintini sp. n. Benoit's species described in 1956 are synonymized under Figitesaciculatus (Benoit, 1956): Figiteseffossus syn. n.; Figitesfavonius syn. n.; Figitesfurvus syn. n.; Figitesfraudator syn. n. Identification keys to the figitine genera and species occurring in the Afrotropical region are provided. Online interactive Lucid Phoenix and Lucid matrix keys are available at: http://www.waspweb.org/Cynipoidea/Keys/index.htm.

  • 1861.
    van Rooy, Jacques
    et al.
    South African National Biodiversity Institute,.
    Bergamini, Ariel
    Bisang, Irene
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Fifty shades of red: Lost or threatened bryophytes in Africa2019In: Bothalia, ISSN 0006-8241, ISSN (Print) 0006-8241, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A Red List of thretened bryophytes is lacking for Africa. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Commission (SSC) Bryophyte Specialist Group has recently launched the ‘Top 10 Initiative’ to identify the 10 species on each continent that are at highest risk of extinction.

    Objectives: The main aim of this paper was to highlight some of the lost or strongly threatened bryophyte species in sub-Saharan Africa and the East African islands and to draw up a Top 10 list for Africa.

    Method:  Lost or threatened species have been identified with the help of experts on the bryoflora of Africa, global and regional Red Lists and taxonomic literature. Each species on this candidate list is discussed at the hand of its taxonomy, distribution, habitat, threat and current global or regional Red List status as far as previously assessed.

    Results: Fifty bryophyte species, representing 40 genera and 23 families, have been identified as Top 10 candidates. Of these, 29 are endemic to Africa and 21 are restricted to the East African islands. The majority of the candidate species occur in one of eight ‘biodiversity hotspots’ with most species (19) in the Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands hotspot.

    Conclusion: This is the first list of lost or threatened bryophytes for Africa and the first Top 10 list of the IUCN Bryophyte Specialist Group. It represents an important step towards regional and global Red List assessment of bryophytes, thus meeting the targets of the Updated Global Strategy for Plant Conservation 2011–2020 and priorities of The Shenzhen Declaration on Plant Sciences.

  • 1862. van Schijndel, Valby
    et al.
    Cornell, David H.
    Frei, Dirk
    Simonsen, Siri Lene
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Crustal evolution of the Rehoboth Province from Archaean to Mesoproterozoic times: Insights from the Rehoboth Basement Inlier2014In: Precambrian Research, ISSN 0301-9268, E-ISSN 1872-7433, Vol. 240, p. 22-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1863. van Zuilen, M. A.
    et al.
    Philippot, P.
    Whitehouse, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Lepland, A.
    Sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation in impact depositsof the 3.2 billion-year-old Mapepe Formation,Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa2014In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 142, p. 429-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical and experimental studies have shown that atmospheric SO2 isotopologue self-shielding effects in the 190–220 nmregion of the solar spectrum are the likely cause for mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (S-MIF). The main productsof this photochemical reaction – SO3 and S0 – typically define a compositional array of ca. D33S/d34S = 0.06–0.14. This is atodds with the generally observed trend in Archean sulfides, which broadly defines an array of ca. D33S/d34S = 0.9. Various explanationshave been proposed, including a diminution of d34S caused by chemical and biogenic mass-dependent fractionation ofsulfur isotopes (S-MDF), mixing with photolytic products produced during felsic volcanic events, or partial blocking of the lowwavelengthpart of the spectrum due to the presence of reduced atmospheric gases or an organic haze. Early in Earth history largemeteorite impacts would have ejected dust and gas clouds into the atmosphere that shielded solar radiation and affected globalclimate. It is thus likely that at certain time intervals of high meteorite flux the atmosphere was significantly perturbed, having aneffect on atmospheric photochemistry and possibly leaving anomalous sulfur isotopic signatures in the rock record. Here wedescribe the sulfur isotopic signatures in sulfides of spherule beds S2, S3 and S4 of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa.In particular, in spherule bed S3 – and to a lesser extent S4 – a trend of ca. D33S/d34S = 0.23 is observed that closely follows theexpected trend for SO2-photolysis in the 190–220 nm spectral range. This suggests that an impact dust cloud (deposited as spherulebeds), which sampled the higher region of the atmosphere, specifically incorporated products of SO2 photolysis in the 190–220 nm range, and blocked photochemical reactions at higher wavelengths (250–330 nm band). By implication, the generallyobserved Archean trend appears to be the result of mixing of different MIF-S sources arising from a variety of photochemicalreactions that took place in the lower part of the atmosphere.

  • 1864. Vanderpoorten, Alain
    et al.
    Patiño, Jairo
    Dirkse, Gerard
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Early divergence of anAzorean endemic species in the moss genus Rhynchostegiella(Brachytheciaceae)2015In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 210, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1865. Varella, Henrique
    et al.
    Zuanon, Jansen
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    López-Fernández, Hernán
    Teleocichla preta, a new species of cichlid from the Rio Xingu basin in Brazil (Teleostei: Cichlidae)2016In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 89, no 3, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teleocichla preta nov. sp. inhabits the rapids along the Rio Xingu and lower portion of the Rio Iriri. It is the largest species in the genus, reaching 121·3 mm standard length (LS) while others do not reach more than 87·8 mm LS. Teleocichla preta is distinguished from all other species of Teleocichla by the unique blackish (in live specimens) or dark brown (preserved specimens) overall colouration of the body, which masks the faint vertical bars or zig-zag pattern of blotches on the flanks. Teleocichla preta also has a deeper body and a deep laterally compressed caudal peduncle, unlike any other congener, as well as a stout lower pharyngeal tooth plate bearing molariform teeth on its median area.

  • 1866. Varga, Oleksandr
    et al.
    Reshchikov, Alexey
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Broad, Gavin R
    First record of the genus Aplomerus Provancher, 1886 (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Xoridinae) from the Oriental region, with descriptions of two new species.2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, no 3815, p. 591-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Aplomerus Provancher, 1886 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) is a small genus of the subfamily Xoridinae. Two new species from Asia, A. orientalis Varga & Reshchikov sp. n. from Thailand and A. phamae Broad sp. n. from Vietnam, are described and illustrated. An identification key for Asian species is provided. These are the first records of the genus from the Oriental region and increases the known number of Aplomerus species to eight, with a disjunct distribution of North America, Japan and south-east Asia.

  • 1867.
    Velitzelos, Demitrios
    et al.
    Athens University.
    Bouchal, Johannes Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. University of Vienna.
    Denk, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Review of the Cenozoic floras and vegetation of Greece2014In: Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, ISSN 0034-6667, Vol. 204, p. 56-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligocene to Pleistocene floras of Greece are reviewed based on published and unpublishedmaterial. Oldest plant-bearing sediments of Rupelian–Chattian age are exposed in eastern Thrace (Evros) and were deposited after the closure of the Turgai Seaway. They contain a blend of (i) taxa that migrated to western Eurasia from the East (Alnus, Fagus), (ii) characteristic Oligocene taxa (Nyssa altenburgensis, Ampelopsis hibschii), and (iii) extinct (Eotrigonobalanus, Quasisequoia) and modern genera (Calocedrus, Quercus Group Lobatae) from older epochs. Coastal palmswamps and laurel forests of the hinterland indicate a subtropical, fully humid to winter-dry climate (Cfa, Cwa according to Köppen). The Aquitanian–Burdigalian plant assemblage of Lesbos is intermediary between Evros and the Burdigalian floras of Euboea sharing taxa with Evros (palms), and with Euboea and early Miocene floras of Anatolia (Güvem, Tilia). In the early Miocene (Burdigalian) floras of Euboea, species of Quercus Group Ilex (Quercus drymeja, Quercus mediterranea) characteristic of fully humid or winter-dry (monsoon) climates (Cf, Cw) became dominant elements in well-drained forests. Floristic links are with late Oligocene to middle Miocene floras of Central Asia (Tilia), AsiaMinor (cycads, Quercus Group Ilex, Tilia), and South and Central Europe (cycads, Quercus Group Ilex, palms). Middle Miocene floras are restricted to the Aegean Islands (Chios). Biogeographic links arewith early to lateMiocene floras of Central Europe (Parrotia, Podocarpium) andwithmiddle Miocene floras of Anatolia (Parrotia). UpperMiocene plant-bearing sedimentary formations aremost abundant in Greece and exposed on the Ionian Islands, Greece mainland to East Macedonia, Peloponnese, Aegean Islands, and Crete. Overall, the fossil plant assemblages from Greece mainland are indicative of fully humid conditions during this time (Cfa), with Fagus and oaks of Quercus Group Ilex being dominant elements. Seasonality may have been more pronounced on the Peloponnese and the Aegaean Islands and Crete, expressed by the rare occurrence of Fagus in the fossil records of these areas. The palaeobotanical records from Samos unambiguously point to the presence of forest vegetation during early Tortonian to Messinian (Cwa) when the famous vertebrate faunas of Samos were deposited. The Pliocene is characterized by the regional occurrence of modern types of deciduous oaks mainly of Quercus Group Cerris and Quercus subsect. Galliferae. East Asian links persist in Fagus, Quercus, and Cupressaceae,North American ones in Sabal; several othermesophytic taxa fromprevious periods are recorded as well. The modern sclerophyllous Mediterranean vegetation, thriving in a warm summer dry climate (Csa), cannot be traced prior to the Pleistocene based on the palaeobotanical record.

  • 1868. Verschut, Vasiliki
    et al.
    Strandmark, Alma
    Esparza-Salas, Rodrigo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Hambäck, Peter
    Seasonally varying marine influences on the coastal ecosystem detected through molecular gut analysis2018In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 1869. Vigil-Stenman, Theoden
    et al.
    Larsson, John
    Nylander, Johan A A
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics. BILS.
    Bergman, Birgitta
    Local hopping mobile DNA implicated in pseudogene formation and reductive evolution in an obligate cyanobacteria-plant symbiosis.2015In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Insertion sequences (ISs) are approximately 1 kbp long "jumping" genes found in prokaryotes. ISs encode the protein Transposase, which facilitates the excision and reinsertion of ISs in genomes, making these sequences a type of class I ("cut-and-paste") Mobile Genetic Elements. ISs are proposed to be involved in the reductive evolution of symbiotic prokaryotes. Our previous sequencing of the genome of the cyanobacterium 'Nostoc azollae' 0708, living in a tight perpetual symbiotic association with a plant (the water fern Azolla), revealed the presence of an eroding genome, with a high number of insertion sequences (ISs) together with an unprecedented large proportion of pseudogenes. To investigate the role of ISs in the reductive evolution of 'Nostoc azollae' 0708, and potentially in the formation of pseudogenes, a bioinformatic investigation of the IS identities and positions in 47 cyanobacterial genomes was conducted. To widen the scope, the IS contents were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively in 20 other genomes representing both free-living and symbiotic bacteria.

    RESULTS: Insertion Sequences were not randomly distributed in the bacterial genomes and were found to transpose short distances from their original location ("local hopping") and pseudogenes were enriched in the vicinity of IS elements. In general, symbiotic organisms showed higher densities of IS elements and pseudogenes than non-symbiotic bacteria. A total of 1108 distinct repeated sequences over 500 bp were identified in the 67 genomes investigated. In the genome of 'Nostoc azollae' 0708, IS elements were apparent at 970 locations (14.3%), with 428 being full-length. Morphologically complex cyanobacteria with large genomes showed higher frequencies of IS elements, irrespective of life style.

    CONCLUSIONS: The apparent co-location of IS elements and pseudogenes found in prokaryotic genomes implies earlier IS transpositions into genes. As transpositions tend to be local rather than genome wide this likely explains the proximity between IS elements and pseudogenes. These findings suggest that ISs facilitate the reductive evolution in for instance in the symbiotic cyanobacterium 'Nostoc azollae' 0708 and in other obligate prokaryotic symbionts.

  • 1870. Vihtakari, M.
    et al.
    Renaud, P.
    Clarke, L.J.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Hop, H.
    Carroll, M.L.
    Ambrose, W.
    Decoding the oxygen isotope signal for seasonal growth patterns in Arctic bivalves.2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 446, p. 263-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical and physical variations in skeletal structures of marine organisms can reflect environmental variability, forming the basis for reconstructing the conditions in which the organism lived. The successful use of these bio-archives for reconstructing seasonal environmental conditions is dependent on understanding intra-annual growth patterns and timing of their deposition within skeletal structures. We studied intra-annual shell growth patterns, as well as the timing and environmental processes associated with winter growth line deposition in two circumpolar bivalve mollusks, Serripes groenlandicus and Ciliatocardium ciliatum. Shell growth deposited during a 1-year deployment on oceanographic moorings in Kongsfjorden and Rijpfjorden, Svalbard, was analyzed in situ for δ18O values using high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A new digital method was developed to measure the location of SIMS spots along chronologically deposited shell material. Dynamic time warping algorithms were adapted to align SIMS-determined δ18O values with δ18O values predicted from continuous mooring instrument recordings of seawater temperature and salinity, in order to derive intra-annual shell growth models. The resulting growth models indicated that the prominent winter growth band was formed during a slow shell growth period lasting from December until May in Kongsfjorden and from November until mid-June in Rijpfjorden. The length of the slow growth period was most likely controlled by food availability. Shell growth rate during the growing season was significantly explained by temperature (marginal R2 = 0.29, p < 0.001) indicating that temperature partly drives shell growth rate when the food supply is sufficient. The insights into intra-annual shell growth of Arctic bivalves and the methods developed in our study are important contributions for further development of bivalve shells as proxy archives.

  • 1871. Vikberg, Veli
    et al.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomy of some European species of Mesochorus, including three new species from Finland and Sweden (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Mesochorinae)2017In: w-album, ISSN ISSN 1795-665X, Vol. 20, p. 3-42Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Redescriptions of the following seven species are made: Mesochorus gemellus Holmgren, 1860, M. tachypus Holmgren,

    1860, M. diversicolor Viereck, 1912, M. brevicollis Thomson, 1886, M. giberius (Thunberg, 1822), M. marginatus Thomson, 1886,

    and M. tetricus Holmgren, 1860. Three new species are described: M. marginatoides Vikberg sp. n. from Finland and Sweden, M.

    skanensis Vikberg sp. n. from Sweden, and M. ranini Vikberg sp. n. from Finland. The female of M. plumosus Dasch, 1971 is

    described from Finland (this species is known earlier only from N. America). A key to females of the eleven studied European

    species of Mesochorus is included.

    The following formal nomenclatural acts or changes are made: lectotypes are designated for Mesochorus tachypus Holmgren, 1860

    and for M. tetricus Holmgren, 1860. Mesochorus tachypus Holmgren, 1860, stat. n. (= M. macrurus Thomson, 1886, syn. n.), M.

    diversicolor Viereck, 1912, stat. n., M. brevicollis Thomson, 1886, stat. n., M. marginatus Thomson, 1886, stat. n., and M. tetricus

    Holmgren, 1860 (= M. curvicauda Thomson, 1886, syn. n.).

    Many females of M. tachypus and M. tetricus were found near the ground in the spruce forests in Janakkala, South Finland very

    late in the season (from October to December in 2011-2016). M. cimbicis (Ratzeburg, 1844) has been reared from cocoons of

    Trichiosoma sp. (scalesii Leach aggregate) and T. nanae Vikberg & Viitasaari in Finland. The correct primary host of Mesochorus

    bipartitus Schwenke, 1999 is Lygus rugulipennis Poppius (Hemiptera: Miridae).

  • 1872. Vilhelmsen, Lars
    et al.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Figitidae (Cynipoidea)2015In: The Greenland Entomofauna: An identification manual of insects, spiders and their allies / [ed] Böcher, Jens, Kristensen, Niels P, Pape, Thomas & Vilhelmsen, Lars, Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 200-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1873. Villavicencio, Natalia
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The Casa del Diablo cave (Puno, Peru) and the late Pleistocene demise of megafauna in the Andean Altiplano2018In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 195, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Late Quaternary Extinction event South America lost ~83% of all its late Pleistocene megafaunal genera. As in other regions of the world, the debate about the possible drivers behind these extinctions revolves around the role of humans arriving into the continent and on the effect of the climatic changes characteristic of the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. The availability of precise chronological information, in order to estimate the timing of extinction of the different taxa affected, is critical for solving such debate. Here we present an updated study of the late Pleistocene mammalian deposits from Casa del Diablo Cave (CdD) in the Altiplano of Peru. The study includes an updated list of the mammalian faunas found in the cave and 11 taxon-specific XAD radiocarbon dates from extinct and extant megafauna bones.We compare this new chronology to the timing of major environmental changes and human arrival in the area, as well as with other megafaunal discoveries from the high Andes. The radiocarbon dates from CdD fall in the time window between 23 and 12.8 cal kyr BP. Compared to other records of extinct megafauna in the high Andes, the one from CdD presents in general younger occurrences. No temporal overlap between humans and extinct megafauna emerges from comparing first dates of appearance of humans in the Altiplano, and last appearance dates of extinct megafauna from CdD. However, the possibility of temporal overlap among the records becomes evident when we compare confidence intervals calculated to estimate true times of human arrival and megafaunal local extinctions.

  • 1874. Vinuesa, Victor
    et al.
    Madurell-Malapeira, Joan
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Robles, Josep M.
    Obradó, Paul
    Alba, David M.
    A New Skull of Hyaenictis Gaudry, 1861 (Carnivora, Hyaenidae) Shows Incipient Adaptations to Durophagy2016In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1875. Viranta, Suvi
    et al.
    Atickem, Anagaw
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Stenseth, Nils Christian
    Rediscovering a forgotten canid species2017In: BMC Zoology, ISSN 2056-3132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The African wolf, for which we herein recognise Canis lupaster Hemprich and Ehrenberg, 1832 (Symbolae Physicae quae ex Itinere Africam Borealem er Asoam Occidentalem Decas Secunda. Berlin, 1833) as the valid species name (we consider the older name Canis anthus Cuvier, 1820 [Le Chacal de Sénégal, Femelle. In: Geoffroy St.-Hilaire E, Cuvier F, editors. Histoire Naturelle des Mammifères Paris, A. Belin, 1820] a nomen dubium), is a medium-sized canid with wolf-like characters. Because of phenotypic similarity, specimens of African wolf have long been assigned to golden jackal (Canis aureus Linnaeus, 1758 [Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, Secundum Classes, Ordines, Genera, Species, cum Characteribus, Differentiis, Synonymis, Locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata, 1758]).

    Results

    Here we provide, through rigorous morphological analysis, a species description for this taxonomically overlooked species. Through molecular sequencing we assess its distribution in Africa, which remains uncertain due to confusion regarding possible co-occurrence with the Eurasian golden jackal. Canis lupasterdiffers from all other Canis spp. including the golden jackal in its cranial morphology, while phylogenetically it shows close affinity to the Holarctic grey wolf (Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758 [Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, Secundum Classes, Ordines, Genera, Species, cum Characteribus, Differentiis, Synonymis, Locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata, 1758]). All sequences generated during this study clustered with African wolf specimens, consistent with previous data for the species.

    Conclusions

    We suggest that the estimated current geographic range of golden jackal in Africa represents the African wolf range. Further research is needed in eastern Egypt, where a hybrid zone between Eurasian golden jackal and African wolf may exist. Our results highlight the need for improved studies of geographic range and population surveys for the taxon, which is classified as ‘least concern’ by the IUCN due to its erroneous identification as golden jackal. As a species exclusively distributed in Africa, investigations of the biology and threats to African wolf are needed.

  • 1876. Viranta, Suvi
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivora from the Sinap Formation, Turkey2003In: The Miocene Sinap Formation, Turkey / [ed] Fortelius, M., Kappelman, J. Bernor, R.L. & Sen, S., New York: Columbia University Press, 2003, p. 178-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1877. Virtasalo, J.J.
    et al.
    Laitala, J.J.
    Lahtinen, R.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pyritic event beds and sulfidized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates in metalliferous black mudstones of the Paleoproterozoic Talvivaara formation, Finland2015In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, ISSN 0012-821X, E-ISSN 1385-013X, Vol. 432, p. 449-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paleoproterozoic, 2.0–1.9 Ga Talvivaara formation of Finland was deposited during the Shunga Event, a worldwide episode of enhanced accumulation of organic-rich sediments in the aftermath of the Lomagundi–Jatuli carbon isotope excursion. Sulfidic carbonaceous mudstones in the Talvivaara formation contain one of the largest known shale-hosted nickel deposits. In order to gain new insight into this Shungian sedimentary environment, sedimentological, petrographical and in situ S and Fe isotopic microanalyses were carried out on samples representing depositional and early-diagenetic conditions. The event-bedded lithology with tidal signatures in the organic-rich mudstones strongly indicates deposition from predominantly river-delivered mud on a highly-productive coastal area, below storm-wave base. The riverine supply of phosphorus, sulfate and iron supported high primary productivity and resulted in strong lateral and vertical chemical gradients in the nearshore waters with a shallow oxic surface layer underlain by euxinic water. The stratigraphic upper part of the Talvivaara formation contains banded intervals of thin alternating pyrite beds and carbonaceous mudstone beds. The pyrite beds were deposited by seaward excursions of the concentrated, acidic Fe-rich river plume subsequent to droughts or dry seasons, which led to intense pyrite precipitation upon mixing with euxinic waters. δS34 and δFe56 values of the bedded pyrite (median δS34=−10.3‰ and δFe56=−0.79‰) are consistent with the reaction of dissolved Fe(II) with H2S from bacterial sulfate reduction. Organic-rich clayey Fe-monosulfide-bearing granules were transported from the muddy estuary, and enclosed in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates that were forming by wave and current reworking in nearshore accumulations of river-delivered iron. The isotopic composition of these presently pyrrhotitic inclusions (median δS34=−3.3‰ and δFe56=−1.6‰) indicates microbial iron reduction. The Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates were transported in muddy debris flows to the distal euxinic seafloor. Their Fe (oxyhydr)oxide matrix was replaced by pyrite (median δS34=+5.8‰ and δFe56=+0.81‰) at shallow sediment depths with 34S and 56Fe-enriched porewater. Wavy-crinkly laminae of possible microbial origin developed on the euxinic seafloor during low sedimentation. These results indicate episodic deposition at seasonal to multiannual time scales. δS34 and δFe56 values in the studied Fe-sulfides provide evidence of microbial isotope fractionation processes and syndepositional and early-diagenetic origin, finding no support for the previously proposed local hydrothermal activity in the Talvivaara mudstones.

  • 1878. Vitelli, M.
    et al.
    Vesella, F.
    Cardoni, S.
    Pollegioni, P.
    Denk, Thomas
    Grimm, Guido, W.
    Simeone, Marco Cosimo
    Phylogeographic structuring of plastome diversity in Mediterranean oaks (Quercus Group Ilex, Fagaceae)2017In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, E-ISSN 1614-2950, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 10.1007/s11295-016-1086-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1879.
    von Weisz, Fredrik
    et al.
    Boliden Mineral AB.
    Jonsson, Erik
    Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, Uppsala.
    Hålenius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Norrskogen - en centralafrikansk fosfatpegmatit i Upplandsskogarna2013In: Geologiskt Forum, ISSN 1104-4721, no 80, p. 16-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 1880.
    Vucetich, John A.
    et al.
    School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA.
    Peterson, Rolf O.
    School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, USA.
    Nelson, Michael P.
    Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA.
    Räikkönen, Jannikke
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Contaminant Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The logic of persistence2010In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 143, no 3, p. 533-534Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1881.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis
    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva (Madrid, Spain).
    OVARIAN EGG MORPHOLOGY IN CHALCIDOID WASPS(HYMENOPTERA: CHALCIDOIDEA) PARASITIZINGGALL WASPS (HYMENOPTERA: CYNIPIDAE)2016In: Graellsia, ISSN 0367-5041, E-ISSN 1989-953X, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide morphological egg data of 26 species of 5 chalcidoid families associated with cynipid galls(Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) from western Palaearctic, including the first egg data for the family Ormyridae. Adultchalcidoid species were reared from galls, and eggs obtained from dissected female ovaries were examinedusing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The shape of the eggs varies from oval to elongate and taperedat both ends. Eggs of Eurytomidae as well as some Eulophidae, Eupelmidae and Pteromalidae are equippedwith a peduncle at the anterior end. We found a positive correlation between long eggs and long ovipositorsand confirmed the expectation that eggs of endoparasitoids are generally shorter and narrower than eggs ofectoparasitoids. We were able to locate the sperm entrance or micropyle at the anterior pole of eggs of severalspecies. It is situated at the anterior end of the egg and at the end of the peduncle when present. In addition,the eggshells of the endoparasitoid Sycophila biguttata (Swederus, 1795) (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) andthe ectoparasitoid Cecidostiba fungosa (Geoffroy, 1785) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), are for the first timedescribed.

  • 1882.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hovmöller, Rasmus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gallstekeln- en mästerlig manipulatör2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan en liten insekt manipulera ett stort träd till att bygga ett hus

    fyllt med mat till sin avkomma? Den gåtan finns ännu inget svar på. Men

    genom att studera gallsteklar kan man i alla fall börja få förståelse för dessa

    mästerliga manipulatörers spännande liv.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-01 11:54
  • 1883.
    Vårdal, Hege
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taeger, Andreas
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Müncheberg, Germany.
    The life of René Malaise: from the wild east to a sunken island2011In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3127, p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review is presented of the life of the Swedish entomologist René Malaise (1892–1978), the inventor of the “Malaisetrap” and one of the most important 20th Century specialists on sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta)

  • 1884. Wacey, David
    et al.
    Brasier, Martin
    Parnell, John
    Culwick, Timothy
    Bowden, Stephen
    Spinks, Sam
    Boyce, Adrian J
    Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett
    Jeon, Heejin
    Saunders, Martin
    Kilburn, Matt R
    Contrasting microfossil preservation and lake chemistries within the 1200–1000 Ma Torridonian Supergroup of NW Scotland2017In: Geological Society, London, Special Publications, Vol. 448, no 1, p. 105-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1885.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Revision and morphological analysis of the Ragadidae (Insecta, Diptera)2019In: European Journal of Taxonomy, ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 0, no 521, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several taxonomic groups within Empidoidea Latreille, 1809 have been subject to unclear phylogenetic assignments along with multiple parallel hypotheses causing difficulties in classification and morphological identification. This study reviews the internal classification of the Ragadidae and includes a diagnosis and description of all included subfamilies and genera based on the results of an analysis of morphological characters using maximum parsimony. Illustration of important characters and a key to all genera in the family is given. The genus Hormopeza Zetterstedt, 1838 is found to be most closely related to Anthepiscopus Becker, 1891 and Iteaphila Zetterstedt, 1838, and the subfamily Iteaphilinae Wahlberg & Johanson, 2018 is therefore expanded to also include that genus. Hormopeza is consequently excluded from Ragadinae Sinclair, 2016. This study provides diagnoses, descriptions and keys in a contribution to a thorough classification of the empidoid groups and increased ease in morphological recognition.

  • 1886.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Espeland, Marianne
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Seven new species of Chimarra (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) from Malawi2014In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3796, no 3, p. 579-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time species of caddisflies in the genus Chimarra Stephens 1829 are reported from Malawi. The following new species are described: Chimarra zombaensis, C. flaviseta, C. chichewa, C. circumverta, C. mulanjae, C. psittacus and C. calidopectoris. The descriptions add to the knowledge of Afrotropical diversity in the order Trichoptera.

  • 1887.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Molecular phylogenetics reveals novel relationships within Empidoidea (Diptera)2018In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113, Vol. 43, p. 619-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empidoidea represent a large and diverse superfamily of true flies, and to date no stable hypothesis on the phylogeny exists. Previous classifications have been based on morphological data and the relationships among several groups are still unknown. Using the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) and cytochrome β (Cytβ) and the nuclear genes carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary (CAD), elongation factor‐1α (EF‐1α) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in a Bayesian analysis, we tested the support of higher taxonomic groups within this large superfamily of flies. We re‐evaluated previous hypotheses of evolution within the group and present a highly supported phylogenetic hypothesis. Atelestidae, Dolichopodidae, Empididae and Hybotidae were supported as monophyletic families, with Atelestidae as sister group to the remaining Empidoidea. Within the family Hybotidae, Bicellariinae stat.n. formed the sister group to the other subfamilies. The family Ragadidae stat.n. is established to include the subfamily Ragadinae and the new subfamily Iteaphilinae subfam.n.; Ragadidae was sister group to the Empididae. Dolichopodidae was found to form a sister group to Ragadidae plus Empididae. Within Empididae, Hemerodromiinae was found to be a nonmonophyletic group. The tribes Hilarini and Hemerodromiini stat. rev. were recovered as sister groups, as were Empidini and Chelipodini stat. rev. The former family Brachystomatidae was found to be nested within Empididae. A revised classification and diagnoses of nondolichopodid families, subfamilies and tribes are provided.

  • 1888. Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    The age, ancestral distribution and radiation of Chimarra (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) using molecular methods2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract
  • 1889. Wallin, Henrik
    et al.
    Kvamme, Torstein
    Bergsten, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    To be or not to be a subspecies: description of Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) developing in downy willow (Salix lapponum L.)2017In: ZooKeys, ISSN 1313-2989, E-ISSN 1313-2970, Vol. 691, p. 103-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A new subspecies of the European cerambycid Saperda populnea (Linnaeus, 1758) is described: Saperda populnea lapponica ssp. n. based on specimens from Scandinavia. The male genitalia characters were examined and found to provide support for this separation, as well as differences in morphology, geographical distribution and bionomy. The preferred host tree for the nominate subspecies S. populnea populnea is Populus tremula L., whereas S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. is considered to be monophagous on Salix lapponum L. DNA sequence data of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was generated from Scandinavian specimens of S. populnea populnea and specimens representing S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. The two subspecies were not reciprocally monophyletic and genetic distances in COI were small. All synonyms of S. populnea populnea have been considered, and species similar to S. populnea populnea have been examined, and not found to be related to S. populnea lapponica ssp. n. A male lectotype has been designated for each of the two following synonyms: Cerambyx decempunctatus De Geer, 1775, and Saperda salicis Zetterstedt, 1818. The synonymised species from Asia, S. balsamifera (Motshulsky, 1860), is elevated to subspecies: S. populnea balsamifera stat. n. We end with a discussion on the definition of subspecies under the unified species concept.

  • 1890.
    Wallménius, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Barboutis, Christos
    Natural History Museum of Crete, University of Crete, Iraklion, Greece.
    Fransson, Thord
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Jaenson, Thomas GT
    Medical Entomology Unit, Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University.
    Olsen, Björn
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Salanek, Erik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University.
    Spotted fever Rickettsia species in Hyalomma and Ixodes ticks infesting migratory birds in the European Mediterranean area2014In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1891. Wang, R
    et al.
    Richards, J
    Jeon, Heejin
    Apatite Sulfur Isotopes Trace Mantle-Input S for Giant Qulong Porphyry Deposit Formation in Continental Collision Zone2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 1892. Wang, Rui
    et al.
    Jeon, Heejin
    Evans, Noreen J
    Archaean hydrothermal fluid modified zircons at Sunrise Dam and Kanowna Belle gold deposits, Western Australia: Implications for post-magmatic fluid activity and ore genesis2018In: American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, no 12, p. 1891-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1893. Wang, Rui
    et al.
    Tafti, Reza
    Hou, Zeng-qian
    Shen, Zhi-chao
    Guo, Na
    Evans, Noreen J
    Jeon, Heejin
    Li, Qiu-yun
    Li, Wei-kai
    Across-arc geochemical variation in the Jurassic magmatic zone, Southern Tibet: Implication for continental arc-related porphyry CuAu mineralization2017In: Chemical Geology, Vol. 451, p. 116-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1894. Wang, Xianghua
    et al.
    Buyck, Bart
    Verbeken, Annemieke
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Revisiting the morphology and phylogeny of Lactifluus with three new lineages from southern China2015In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1895.
    Wang, Xianghua
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany. Current address: Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P.R. China..
    Huhtinen, Seppo
    Herbarium, Biodiversity Unit, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland..
    Hansen, Karen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Multilocus phylogenetic and coalescent-based methods reveal dilemma in generic limits, cryptic species, and a prevalent intercontinental disjunct distribution in Geopyxis (Pyronemataceae s. l., Pezizomycetes): TAXONOMY AND PHYLOGENY OF GEOPYXIS2017In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1189-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Species limits in the small genus Geopyxis

     are debatable because of problems with interpreting

    the few phenotypic features and poor documentation

    of types. To clarify species boundaries and diversity,

    we studied the morphology of 74 specimens of Geopyxis

     from the Northern Hemisphere, including five types,

    and sequenced four loci for 57 representatives: the

    nuc rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS), D1-D2 domains of

    nuc 28S rDNA (28S), translation elongation factor

    (tef1 ), and (or) part of the second largest subunit of

    the RNA polymerase II (rpb 2) (5 7 region). Eight species

    are delimited. Six species are shown to be highly

    supported as reciprocally monophyletic: G. aleurioides

     sp. nov., G. alpina  s. l., G. carbonaria , G. delectans , G.

    korfii , and G. majalis . In addition, coalescent-based

    Bayesian species delimitation shows G. alpina  s. l. constitutes

    three cryptic species: G. alpina  s. str., G. deceptiva

     sp. nov., and G. rehmii . ITS-28S sequences of type

    material show that G. vulcanalis  and G. foetida  are synonyms

    of G. carbonaria . A lectotype is designated for

    Humaria delectans  and the name is combined in Geopyxis .

    Morphological characters that can be used to distinguish

    Geopyxis  species are presence/absence of a

    long stipe, spore size and shape, and pigmented resinous

    exudates in medullary and ectal excipulum. Geopyxis

    carbonaria  and G. delectans  produce apothecia

    almost exclusively on burned ground. Bayesian analyses

    detected highly supported conflicts among different

    loci regarding generic delimitation and species

    relationships. Two hypogeous genera, Stephensia  and

    Hydnocystis , are confirmed to nest within Geopyxis . The

    relationships between species of Geopyxis  and Tarzetta ,

    Stephensia shanorii  and Paurocotylis pila , are unresolved.

    Six out of eight species of Geopyxis  recognized in this

    study have intercontinental disjunct distributions.

  • 1896.
    Wanntorp, Livia
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Grudinski, Melanie
    Forster, Paul
    Muellner-Riehl, Alexandra N.
    Grimm, Guido W.
    Wax plants (Hoya, Apocynaceae) evolution: epiphytism drives successfull radiation2014In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Taxon, Vol. 63, p. 89-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1897. Ward, D.
    et al.
    Bischoff, A.
    Roszjar, J.
    Berndt, J.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Trace element inventory of meteoritic Ca-phosphates.2017In: American Mineralogist, ISSN 0003-004X, E-ISSN 1945-3027, Vol. 102, p. 1856-1880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most extraterrestrial samples feature the two accessory Ca-phosphates (apatite-group minerals and merrillite), which are important carrier phases of the rare earth elements (REE). The trace-element concentrations (REE, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, Hf, Ta, Pb, Th, and U) of selected grains were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and/or SIMS (REE only). This systematic investigation includes 99 apatite and 149 merrillite analyses from meteorites deriving from various asteroidal bodies including 1 carbonaceous chondrite, 8 ordinary chondrites, 3 acapulcoites, 1 winonaite, 2 eucrites, 5 shergottites, 1 ureilitic trachyandesite, 2 mesosiderites, and 1 silicate-bearing IAB iron meteorite.Although Ca-phosphates predominantly form in metamorphic and/or metasomatic reactions, some are of igneous origin. As late-stage phases that often incorporate the vast majority of their host’s bulk REE budget, the investigated Ca-phosphates have REE enrichments of up to two orders of magnitude compared to the host rock’s bulk concentrations. Within a single sample, each phosphate species displays a uniform REE-pattern, and variations are mainly restricted to their enrichment, therefore indicating similar formation conditions. Exceptions are brecciated samples, i.e., the Adzhi-Bogdo (LL3-6) ordinary chondrite. Despite this uniformity within single samples, distinct meteorite groups do not necessarily have unique REE-patterns. Four basic shapes dominate the REE patterns of meteoritic Ca-phosphates: (1) flat patterns, smoothly decreasing from La-Lu with prominent negative Eu anomalies (acapulcoites, eucrites, apatite from the winonaite and the ureilitic trachyandesite, merrillite from ordinary chondrites); (2) unfractionated patterns, with only minor or no anomalies (mesosiderites, enriched shergottites, IAB-iron meteorite); (3) LREE-enriched patterns, with either positive or slightly negative Eu anomalies (chondritic apatite); and (4) strongly LREE-depleted patterns, with negative Eu anomalies (depleted shergottites). The patterns do not correlate with the grade of metamorphism (petrologic type), specific adjacent mineral assemblages or with Ca-phosphate grain size. Neither the proportions of different REE, nor particular REE patterns themselves are universally correlated to a specific formation mechanism yet Eu (i.e., magnitude of the Eu anomaly) is a sensitive indicator to evaluate the timing of plagioclase and phosphate crystallization. Based on our data, U and Th abundances in apatite increase (almost linearly) with the grade of metamorphism, as well as with the differentiation of their host rock.

  • 1898.
    Warén, A.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rouse, G.W.
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego.
    A new genus and species of Cataegidae (Gastropoda; Seguenzioidea) from eastern Pacific Ocean methane seeps.2016In: NovApex, Vol. 17, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1899.
    Warén, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Har någon träffat på den här lilla snäckan?2014In: Fauna och Flora, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 40-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    No

  • 1900.
    Warén, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Takano, Tsuyoshi
    Kano, Yasunori
    Megadenus atrae n. sp., an endoparasitic eulimid gastropod (Mollusca) from the black sea cucumber Holothuria atra Jaeger (Aspidochirotida: Holothuriidae) in the Indo-West Pacific2017In: Systematic Parasitology, ISSN 0165-5752, E-ISSN 1573-5192, Vol. 94, p. 699-709Article in journal (Refereed)
35363738394041 1851 - 1900 of 2090
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