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  • 201. Jonsson, Knud Andreas
    et al.
    Reeve, Andrew Hart
    Blom, Mozes P. K.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Marki, Petter Zahl
    Unrecognised (species) diversity in New Guinean passerine birds2019In: Emu (Print), ISSN 0158-4197, E-ISSN 1448-5540, Vol. 119, no 3, SI, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species represent an important unit for the study of diversity, but may not always be delimited consistently across regions and clades. Many of these taxonomic inconsistencies are due to the variable views of taxonomists. In recent years, however, new methodologies have attempted to circumvent this problem by assigning more objective criteria for the delimitation of species, drawing on a wide range of data such as DNA, morphology, vocalisation and ecology. Here, we apply a genetic screening approach in which we sequence the mitochondrial gene ND2 for all recognised subspecies of 16 species in eight genera (a mix of lowland and montane species) from the geologically complex tropical island of New Guinea. We show that populations within some species are genetically highly divergent despite little morphological differentiation, but we also find an example in which populations from five morphologically distinct species are genetically very similar. Overall, our data show higher levels of genetic differentiation than expected, but also highlight the difficulty of predicting which groups contain unrecognised diversity. These results are interesting in their own right, but also have implications for further analyses that focus on increasing our understanding of how diversity builds up over time.

  • 202.
    Jordan, Anna
    et al.
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Broad, Gavin
    Natural History Museum, London.
    Stigenberg, Julia
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hughes, Jessica
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Stone, Jane
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Bedford, Ian
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Penfield, Steven
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    Wells, Rachel
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park.
    The potential of the solitary parasitoid Microctonus brassicae for the biological control of the adult cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala2020In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, ISSN 0013-8703, E-ISSN 1570-7458, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB), Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a major pest of oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. (Brassicaceae), within the UK and continental Europe. Following the withdrawal of many broad-spectrum pesticides, most importantly neonicotinoids, and with increased incidence of pyrethroid resistance, few chemical control options remain, resulting in the need for alternative pest management strategies. We identified the parasitoid wasp Microctonus brassicae (Haeselbarth) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) within CSFB collected from three independent sites in Norfolk, UK. Parasitism of adult CSFB was confirmed, and wasp oviposition behaviour was described. Moreover, we show that within captive colonies parasitism rates are sufficient to generate significant biological control of CSFB populations. A sequence of the M. brassicae mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (MT-CO1) gene was generated for rapid future identification. Moroccan specimens of Microctonus aethiopoides (Loan), possessing 90% sequence similarity, were the closest identified sequenced species. This study represents the first description published in English of this parasitoid of the adult cabbage stem flea beetle.

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  • 203. Jörger, Katharina
    et al.
    Alvaro, Nuno
    Andrade, Luiz
    Araujo, Thiago
    Aramayo, Victor
    Artois, Tom
    Ballentine, William
    Bergmeier, Franziska
    Botelho, Andrea
    Buckenmeyer, Ariane
    Capucho, Ana
    Cherenva, Irina
    Curini-Galletti, Marco
    Davison, Anitha
    Deng, Wang
    Di Domenico, Maikon
    Ellison, Christina
    Engelhardt, Jan
    Fais, Maria
    Fontaneto, Diego
    Frade, Duarte
    de Frias Martins, Antonio
    Goetz, Freya
    Hochberg, Rick
    de Jesus-Navarrete, Alberto
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ylva
    Luckas, Nina
    Martinez Garcia, Alejandro
    Mikhlina, Anna
    Neusser, Timea
    Norenburg, Jon
    Pardo, Juan
    Peixoto, Antonio
    Roberts, Nickellaus
    Savchenko, Alexandra
    Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas
    Tödter, Lenke
    Yap-Chiongco, Megan
    Ricardo Costa, Ana Cristina
    MEIOZORES 2019 - EXPLORING THE MARINE MEIOFAUNA OF THE AZORES2021In: AÇOREANA, p. 17-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In July 2019 an international team of 39 senior and junior researchers from nine

    countries met at the University of the Azores in Ponta Delgada, São Miguel for a 10-daysworkshop/ summer school to explore the meiofaunal biodiversity in marine sediments of the Azores. In total, we sampled intertidal and subtidal sediments from 54 localities on 14 major sites around São Miguel and additionally explored eight freshwater and terrestrial sites for rotifers. We sorted and investigated more than 2000 living specimens in the field, yielding approximately 180 species of soft-bodied meiofauna, representing most major clades of meiofauna with a focus on nematodes, polychaete annelids, proseriate andrhabdocoel flatworms, gastrotrichs, acoelomorphs, nemerteans, molluscs and cnidarians. Most of the encountered diversity shows similarities to the North-East Atlantic continental meiofauna, but in-depth morphological and molecular analyses are still pending. About 60 of the 180 species could not be assigned a species-level identification in the field, and nearly 15% of the total diversity is expected to be new to science and is awaiting formal description. Herein, we present an overview of the results of the workshop, providing detailed information on the sampling sites, methodology and encountered diversity, and we offer a preliminary discussion on aspects of faunal elements shared with other biogeographic regions. We highlight the most common members of the marine meiofauna of the Azores, provide preliminary diversity estimates and suggest a roadmap for future research towards a better understanding of the meiofauna in this remote archipelago.

  • 204.
    Kadin, Martina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Alkfåglarnas födosök sett genom ny teknik2018In: Levande skärgårdsnatur 2018, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 205. Kahanamoku, Sara
    et al.
    Hull, Pincelli
    Lindberg, David
    Hsiang, Allison
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Clites, Erica
    Finnegan, Seth
    Twelve thousand recent patellogastropods from a northeastern Pacific latitudinal gradient2018In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, p. 170197-Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 206.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Feeding Ecology in Oligocene Mylodontoid Sloths (Mammalia,Xenarthra) as Revealed by Orthodentine Microwear Analysis2018In: Journal of mammalian evolution, ISSN 1064-7554, E-ISSN 1573-7055, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 551-564-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, dental microwear analysis has been successfully employed to xenarthran teeth. Here, we present new data on use wear features on 16 molariforms of Orophodon hapaloides and Octodontotherium grande. These taxa count among the earliest sloths and are known from the Deseadan SALMA (late Oligocene). Modern phylogenetic analyses classify Octodontotherium and Orophodon within Mylodontoidea with whom they share lobate cheek teeth with an outer layer of cementum and a thick layer of orthodentine. Similar target areas of 100 μm2 were analyzed on the orthodentine surface of each tooth by stereomicroscopic microwear and by SEM microwear. Results were unlike those of extant sloths (stereomicroscopic microwear: Bradypus, Choloepus) and published data from fossil sloths (SEM microwear: Acratocnus, Megalonyx, Megatherium, Thinobadistes); thus, both approaches independently indicate a different feeding ecology for the Oligocene taxa. The unique microwear results suggest that both taxa fed on plant material with low to moderate intrinsic toughness (foliage, twigs) but also proposes intake of tougher food items (e.g., seeds). Frequent gouging of the tooth surfaces can be explained by exogenous influence on microwear, such as possible intake of abrasive grit. We suggest an unspecialized herbivorous diet for Octodontotherium and Orophodon utilizing diverse food resources of their habitat. These interpretations support the reconstruction of (1) Deseadan environments as open habitats with spreading savannas/grasslands and (2) both taxa as wide muzzled bulk feeders at ground level.

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  • 207.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature for Mammalian post-canine dentitions2017In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 30, no 1-2, p. 30-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental wear facets on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars are traces of their main function, themastication and therefore reflect masticatory movements and also paramasticatory (i.e. non-dietary useof teeth) behavior. Here we present the Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature applicable to most mammaliandentitions. Topographic positions of wear facets in relation to the major cusps and crests of the teeth areused to designate the areas of the occlusal surface the facets occupy (e.g. their mesial, distal, lingual, orbuccal position). Previous published systems for labeling wear facets have been inconsistent with eachother. Therefore, we provide a synoptic review of the most widely-used terminologies, and introducethe alternative Modular Wear Facet Nomenclature. This nomenclature aims to overcome the difficultiescaused by the existing inconsistent wear facet terminologies. Our new approach is applicable to dentitionswhere the occlusal morphology does not change significantly for most of the lifetime of the animal. Inthose dentitions, the primary occlusal surfaces are not significantly modified as wear facets become moreextensive with wearing. This appears to be a common pattern in pre-tribosphenic, tribosphenic molars,and the teeth derived from tribosphenic precursors (e.g. bunodont molar morphologies). In teeth wherethe secondary occlusal surface is functionally intensely modified (i.e. high-crowned and evergrowingteeth with large areas of dentine exposed) any facet labeling system appears to be challenging, since theidentification of individual facets is blurred and their spatial position may be indeterminable.

  • 208.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Short review of dental microstructure and dental microwear in xenarthran teeth2020In: Mammalian Teeth – Form and Function / [ed] Thomas Martin and Wighart von Koenigswald, München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil , 2020, 1, p. 231-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no abstract.

  • 209.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Biomechanical adaptations for burrowing in the incisor enamel microstructure of Geomyidae and Heteromyidae (Rodentia: Geomyoidea)2021In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 11, p. 9447-9459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enamel microstructure of fossil and extant Geomyoidea (Geomyidae, Heteromyidae) lower incisors incorporates three- or two-layered schmelzmusters with uniserial, transverse Hunter-Schreger bands having parallel and perpendicular or exclusively perpendicular oriented interprismatic matrix. Phylogenetically, these schmelzmusters are regarded as moderately (enamel type 2) to highly derived (enamel type 3). Our analysis detected a zone of modified radial enamel close to the enamel–dentine junction. Modified radial enamel shows a strong phylogenetic signal within the clade Geomorpha as it is restricted to fossil and extant Geomyoidea and absent in Heliscomyidae, Florentiamyidae, and Eomyidae. This character dates back to at least the early Oligocene (early Arikareean, 29 Ma), where it occurs in entoptychine gophers. We contend that this specialized incisor enamel architecture developed as a biomechanical adaptation to regular burrowing activities including chisel-tooth digging and a fiber-rich diet and was probably present in the common ancestor of the clade. We regard the occurrence of modified radial enamel in lower incisors of scratch-digging Geomyidae and Heteromyidae as the retention of a plesiomorphic character that is selectively neutral. The shared occurrence of modified radial enamel is a strong, genetically anchored argument for the close phylogenetic relationship of Geomyidae and Heteromyidae on the dental microstructure level.

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  • 210.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lindsay, Everett H.
    Koenigswald, Wighart von
    Paciculus walshi, new species, (Rodentia, Cricetidae), the origin of Cricetidae and an Oligocene intercontinental mammal dispersal event2016In: Historical Biology, Vol. 28, p. 78-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    O'Connor, Patrick M.
    Ohio Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Studies, Athens, Ohio, USA.
    Roberts, Eric M.
    James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.
    A new mammal from the Turonian–Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) Galula Formation, southwestern Tanzania2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 65-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here establish a newmammaliaform genus and species, Galulatheriumjenkinsi (Mammalia), from the UpperCretaceous Galula Formation in the Rukwa Rift Basin of southwestern Tanzania. Thisrepresents the first named taxon of a mammaliaform from the entire Late Cretaceous,an interval of 34 million years, of continental Afro-Africa. Preliminary studyof the holotype (a partial dentary) resulted in tentative assignation to the Gondwanatheria,a poorly known, enigmatic clade of Late Cretaceous–Paleogene Gondwanan mammals (Krauseet al. 2003). The application of advanced imaging (µCT) and visualizationtechniques permits a more detailed understanding of key anatomical features of thenew taxon. CT analysis reveals that the lower dentition consisted of a large,procumbent lower incisor and four cheek teeth, all which are ever growing(hypselodont). Importantly, all of the teeth appear to have been devoid ofenamel during life. Comparisons conducted with a range of Mesozoic and selectedCenozoic mammaliaform groups demonstrates that a number of features (e.g.,enamel-less and ever-growing teeth, columnar cheek teeth with relatively simpleocclusal morphology) expressed in Galulatheriumare reminiscent of disparate groups, making taxonomic assignment difficult. Hereinwe retain the provisional referral of Galulatherium(RRBP 02067) to Gondwanatheria; it is most similar to sudamericids such as Lavanify and Bharratherium from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar and India,respectively, which exhibit relatively simple, high-crowned, columnar cheek teeth.Other features (e.g., enamel-less dentition) shared with disparate forms suchas the Late Jurassic Fruitafossor andvarious xenarthrans (e.g., sloths) are attributed to convergence. Detailed analysesof the depositional context for the type and only specimen place it as havinglived sometime between the late Turonian and latest Campanian (roughly 91–72million years ago). This enhanced geochronological context helps to refine thepalaeobiogeographical significance of Galulatheriumamong Cretaceous mammals in general and those of Gondwanan landmassesspecifically.

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  • 212.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Trocheri, M.W.
    Jungers, W.L.
    The evolutionary origin and population history of the grauer gorilla2016In: Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 159, p. S4-S18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 213. Kano, Yasunori
    et al.
    Takano, Tsuyoshi
    Schwabe, E.
    Warén, A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogenetic position and systematics of the wood-associate limpet genus Caymanabyssia and implications for ecological radiation into deep-sea organic substrates by lepetelloid gastropods.2016In: Marine ecology, ISSN ISSN 0173-9565, Vol. 37, p. 1116-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214. Karlsson, Dave
    et al.
    Hartop, Emily
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Forshage, Mattias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jaschhof, Mathias
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project: a 15 year retrospective on a countrywide inventory.2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e47255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project (SMTP) is one of the most ambitious insect inventories ever attempted. The project was designed to target poorly known insect groups across a diverse range of habitats in Sweden. The field campaign involved the deployment of 73 Malaise traps at 55 localities across the country for three years (2003-2006). Over the past 15 years, the collected material has been hand sorted by trained technicians into over 300 taxonomic fractions suitable for expert attention. The resulting collection is a tremendous asset for entomologists around the world, especially as we now face a desperate need for baseline data to evaluate phenomena like insect decline and climate change. Here, we describe the history, organisation, methodology and logistics of the SMTP, focusing on the rationale for the decisions taken and the lessons learned along the way. The SMTP represents one of the early instances of community science applied to large-scale inventory work, with a heavy reliance on volunteers in both the field and the laboratory. We give estimates of both staff effort and volunteer effort involved. The project has been funded by the Swedish Taxonomy Initiative; in total, the inventory has cost less than 30 million SEK (approximately 3.1 million USD). Based on a subset of the samples, we characterise the size and taxonomic composition of the SMTP material. Several different extrapolation methods suggest that the material comprises around 20 million specimens in total. The material is dominated by Diptera (75% of the specimens) and Hymenoptera (15% of specimens). Amongst the Diptera, the dominant groups are Chironomidae (37% of specimens), Sciaridae (15%), Phoridae (13%), Cecidomyiidae (9.5%) and Mycetophilidae (9.4%). Within Hymenoptera, the major groups are Ichneumonidae (44% of specimens), Diaprioidea (19%), Braconidae (9.6%), Platygastroidea (8.5%) and Chalcidoidea (7.9%). The taxonomic composition varies with latitude and season. Several Diptera and Hymenoptera groups are more common in non-summer samples (collected from September to April) and in the North, while others show the opposite pattern. About 1% of the total material has been processed and identified by experts so far. This material represents over 4,000 species. One third of these had not been recorded from Sweden before and almost 700 of them are new to science. These results reveal the large amounts of taxonomic work still needed on Palaearctic insect faunas. Based on the SMTP experiences, we discuss aspects of planning and conducting future large-scale insect inventory projects using mainly traditional approaches in relation to more recent approaches that rely on molecular techniques.

  • 215.
    Karlsson, Olle
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Miljögifter och Östersjöns toppkonsumenter2014In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, no 3, p. 23-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 216.
    Kauhala, Kaarina
    et al.
    LUKE.
    Kurkilahti, Mika
    LUKE.
    Ahola, Markus
    LUKE.
    Herrero, Annika
    LUKE.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kunnasranta, Mervi
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Tillikainen, Raisa
    Metsähallitus.
    Vetemaa, Markus
    Estonian Marine Institute.
    Age, sex and body condition of Baltic grey seals: Are problem seals a random sample of the population?2015In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 52, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 217. Kitchener, A.C.
    et al.
    Bellemain, E.
    Ding, X.
    Kopatz, A.
    Kutschera, V.E.
    Salomashkina, V.
    Ruiz-García, M.
    Graves, T.
    Hou, Y.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Janke, A.
    Systematics, evolution and genetics of bears2020In: Bears of the World: Ecology, Conservation, and Management / [ed] Penteriani, V. & Melletti, M., Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2020, p. 3-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 218. Kitchener, A.C.
    et al.
    Breitenmoser-Würsten, C.
    Eizirik, E.
    Gentry, A.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wilting, A.
    Yamaguchi, N.
    A revised taxonomy of the Felidae: The final report of the Cat Classification Task Force of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group2017In: Cat News, ISSN 1027-2992Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     1. The current classification of the Felidae was reviewed by a panel of 22 experts divided into core, expert and review groups, which make up the Cat Classification Task Force CCTF of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group.

    2. The principal aim of the CCTF was to produce a consensus on a revised classification of the Felidae for use by the IUCN.

    3. Based on current published research, the CCTF has fully revised the classification of the Felidae at the level of genus, species and subspecies.

    4. A novel traffic-light system was developed to indicate certainty of each taxon based on morphological, molecular, biogeographical and other evidence. A concordance of good evidence in the three principal categories was required to strongly support the acceptance of a taxon.

    5. Where disagreements exist among members of the CCTF, these have been highlighted in the accounts for each species. Only further research will be able to answer the potential conflicts in existing data.

    6. A total of 14 genera, 41 species and 80 subspecies are recognised by most members of the CCTF, which is a considerable change from the classification proposed by Wozencraft (2005), the last major revision of the Felidae.

    7. Future areas of taxonomic research have been highlighted in order to answer current areas of uncertainty.

    8. This classification of the Felidae will be reviewed every five years unless a major new piece of research requires a more rapid revision for the conservation benefit of felid species at risk of extinction.

  • 219.
    Kocot, Kevin
    et al.
    University of Alabama.
    Struck, Torsten
    Natural History Museum, Department of Research and Collections, University of Oslo.
    Merkel, Julia
    Johannes Gutenberg University.
    Waits, Damien
    Auburn University.
    Todt, Christiane
    University Museum of Bergen.
    Brannock, Pamela
    Auburn University.
    Weese, David
    Auburn University.
    Cannon, Johanna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Auburn University.
    Moroz, Leonid
    The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience.
    Lieb, Bernhard
    Johannes Gutenberg University.
    Halanych, Kenneth
    Auburn University.
    Phylogenomics of Lophotrochozoa with consideration of systematic error2017In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 256-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenomic studies have improved understanding of deep metazoan phylogeny and show promise for resolving incongruences among analyses based on limited numbers of loci. One region of the animal tree that has been especially difficult to resolve, even with phylogenomic approaches, is relationships within Lophotrochozoa (the animal clade that includes molluscs, annelids, and flatworms among others). Lack of resolution in phylogenomic analyses could be due to insufficient phylogenetic signal, limitations in taxon and/or gene sampling, or systematic error. Here, we investigated why lophotrochozoan phylogeny has been such a difficult question to answer by identifying and reducing sources of systematic error. We supplemented existing data with 32 new transcriptomes spanning the diversity of Lophotrochozoa and constructed a new set of Lophotrochozoa-specific core orthologs. Of these, 638 orthologous groups (OGs) passed strict screening for paralogy using a tree-based approach. In order to reduce possible sources of systematic error, we calculated branch-length heterogeneity, evolutionary rate, percent missing data, compositional bias, and saturation for each OG and analyzed increasingly stricter subsets of only the most stringent (best) OGs for these five variables. Principal component analysis of the values for each factor examined for each OG revealed that compositional heterogeneity and average patristic distance contributed most to the variance observed along the first principal component while branch-length heterogeneity and, to a lesser extent, saturation contributed most to the variance observed along the second. Missing data did not strongly contribute to either. Additional sensitivity analyses examined effects of removing taxa with heterogeneous branch lengths, large amounts of missing data, and compositional heterogeneity. Although our analyses do not unambiguously resolve lophotrochozoan phylogeny, we advance the field by reducing the list of viable hypotheses. Moreover, our systematic approach for dissection of phylogenomic data can be applied to explore sources of incongruence and poor support in any phylogenomic dataset. 

  • 220. Kodandaramaiah, U.
    et al.
    Weingartner, E.
    Janz, N.
    Dalen, L.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Nylin, S.
    Population structure in relation to host-plant ecology and Wolbachia infestation in the comma butterfly2011In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 2173-2185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 221. Koenigswald, W. v.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Mammal Migrations and Dispersal Events in the Quaternary of Europe1992Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 222.
    Kolicka, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Department of Animal Taxonomy and Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznan, Poland.
    Dabert, Miroslawa
    Molecular Biology Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznań, Poland. .
    Dabert, Jacek
    Department of Animal Morphology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznań, Poland..
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kisielewski, Jacek
    Department of Animal Taxonomy and Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Umultowska 89, 61–614 Poznan, Poland. .
    Bifidochaetus, a new Arctic genus of freshwater Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha) from Spitsbergen revealed by an integrative taxonomic approach2016In: Invertebrate systematics, ISSN 1445-5226, E-ISSN 1447-2600, ISSN 1445-5226, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 398-419, article id IS16001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha is a cosmopolitan phylum of aquatic and semi-terrestrial invertebrates that comprises ~820 described species. To date, freshwater gastrotrichs have not been the subject of faunistic or taxonomic research in the polar regions. In this paper, we present the first species-level description of a freshwater gastrotrich from the Arctic (Svalbard Archipelago). Evidence from morphology, morphometry and molecular analyses reveals that the species represents a new genus in Chaetonotidae: Bifidochaetus arcticus, gen. et sp. nov. Taking into consideration many morphological similarities to Chaetonotus (Primochaetus) veronicae Kånneby, 2013 we propose to include C. (P.) veronicae in the newly established genus under the new combination Bifidochaetus veronicae (Kånneby, 2013), comb. nov. In the phylogenetic analysis based on nuclear 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequence data, B. arcticus, gen. et sp. nov. is nested within the family Chaetonotidae, as the sister group to the genus Lepidochaetus Kisielewski, 1991. In this paper we also present new taxonomic characters useful for gastrotrich taxonomy: the pharynx-to-intestine length ratio (I) and the spine bifurcation ratio (B).

  • 223. KROH, ANDREAS
    et al.
    MOOI, RICH
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    <p><strong>On the spelling of <em>Antrechinus nordenskjoldi </em>(Echinodermata: Echinoidea)*</strong></p>2012In: Zoosymposia, ISSN 1178-9905, E-ISSN 1178-9913, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species in the Pardosa lugubris group from Central Europe (Arachnida, Araneae, Lycosidae)1999In: Spixiana, ISSN 0341-8391, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A new species of wolf spider from the Pyrenees, with remarks on other species in the Pardosa pullata-group (Araneae, Lycosidae)2007In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 1650, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A Presumptive Pheromone-Emitting Structure in Wolf Spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae)1986In: Psyche: A Journal of Entomology, ISSN 0033-2615, E-ISSN 1687-7438, Vol. 93, no 1-2, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Carl Clerck and what became of his spiders and their names2010In: European Arachnology 2008 / [ed] Nentwig, W., Entling, M. & Kropf, C., Bern, 2010, p. 105-117Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Comparison between Pirata tenuitarsis Simon, new to Sweden and England, and P. piraticus (Clerck), with notes on taxonomic characters in male Pirata (Araneae: Lycosidae)1980In: Entomologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0013-8711, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 65-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Draposa, a new wolf spider genus from South and Southeast Asia (Araneae: Lycosidae)2010In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 2637, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    On Pardosa schenkeli (Araneae, Lycosidae) and its presence in Germany and Poland2006In: Arachnologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 1018-4171, Vol. 32, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    On the identity of Pardosa taczanowskii (Thorell) (Araneae: Lycosidae)2013In: Arthropoda Selecta, ISSN 0136-006X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 55-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Pardosa schenkeli - en för Sverige ny vargspindelart2005In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 36-41Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Separation of two species standing as Alopecosa aculeata (Clerck) by morphological, behavioural and ecological characters, with remarks on related species in the pulverulenta group (Araneae, Lycosidae)1990In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 203-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Species of Wadicosa (Araneae, Lycosidae): transfer of four species from Africa currently placed in Pardosa2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5227, no 5, p. 531-548Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 235.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Species of Wadicosa (Araneae, Lycosidae): transfer of two species from Pardosa and description of three new species from Africa2015In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 132, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 236.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Studies on Species of Holarctic Pardosa Groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). I. Redescription of Pardosa albomaculata Emerton and description of two new species from North America, with comments on some taxonomic characters1975In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 217-228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Studies on species of Holarctic Pardosa groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). III. Redescriptions of Pardosa algens (Kulczynski), P. septentrionalis (Westring), and P. sodalis Holm1986In: Entomologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0013-8711, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 215-234Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Studies on species of Holarctic Pardosa groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). IV. Redescription of Pardosa tetonensis Gertsch and descriptions of two new species from the western United States1987In: Entomologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0013-8711, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 409-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Study of a stridulatory apparatus in Pardosa fulvipes (Collett) (Araneae, Lycosidae) by scanning electron microscopy1973In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 43-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Study on chemosensitive hairs in wolf spiders (Araneae, Lycosidae) by scanning electron microscopy1979In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 279-285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Taxonomic notes on Agroeca (Araneae, Liocranidae)2009In: Arachnologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 1018-4171, Vol. 37, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vargspindlar2018In: Yrfän, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 17-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 243.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dondale, Charles D.
    Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre, Research Branch, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa K1A 0C6, Canada.
    Zyuzin, Alexey A.
    Abylai Khan Avenue, 131-38, 480091 Almaty, Kazakhstan Republic.
    Pardosa C.L. Koch, 1847 (Arachnida, Araneae): proposed fixation of Lycosa alacris C.L. Koch, 1833 as the type species to conserve the usage of Pardosa and of Alopecosa Simon, 18852002In: Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature, ISSN 0007-5767, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 7-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 244.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Logunov, Dmitri V.
    Department of Zoology, Manchester Museum, Manchester University, Manchester M13 9PL, UK .
    On the separation of Sitticus raineri Peckham & Peckham and S. saxicola (C. L. Koch) (Araneae, Salticidae)2001In: Revue suisse de Zoologie, ISSN 0035-418X, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 463-481Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 245.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Logunov, Dmitri V
    Department of Zoology, Manchester Museum, Manchester, UK.
    On the separation of Sitticus ranieri Peckham & Peckham and S. saxicola (C. L. Koch) (Araneae, Salticidae)2001In: Revue suisse de zoologie, ISSN 0035-418X, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 463-481Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Marusik, Yuri M.
    Institute for Biological Problems of the North, Far East Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Magadan, Russia.
    On Acantholycosa solituda (Levi & Levi) and A. sterneri (Marusik) (Araneae: Lycosidae), a pair of geographically distant allied species2002In: Acta arachnologica, ISSN 0001-5202, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Marusik, Yuri M.
    Studies on species of Holarctic Pardosa groups (Araneae, Lycosidae). VII. The Pardosa tesquorum group2011In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3131, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mellbrand, Kajsa
    Hoppspindeln Pseudicius encarpatus återfunnen i Sverige2006In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 24-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 249. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.
    Berger, Lee R.
    Carnivoran remains from the Malapa hominin site, South Africa2011In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 11, p. e26940-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene.

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  • 250. Kuhn, Kerstin
    et al.
    Schwenk, Klaus
    Both, Christiaan
    Canal, David
    Johansson, Ulf S.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    van der Mije, Steven
    Töpfer, Till
    Päckert, Martin
    Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track globalclimate change2013In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 3, no 14, p. 4799-4799Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 534
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