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  • 201.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE).
    Gustavsson, Lena
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Kronestedt, Torbjörn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Lundberg, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Norbäck Ivarsson, Lena
    Södertörn University.
    Sallstedt, Therese
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE).
    Scheuerer, Manuela
    Sweco Rail.
    Thureborn, Olle
    Stockholm University.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Unikt ekosystem i tunnelbanan vid Kungsträdgården2017In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 2-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 202.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Holm, Nils
    Neubeck, Anna
    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor igneous crust2015In: Trace Metal Biogeochemsitry and Ecology of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Systems / [ed] Demina, L.L., Galkin, S.V., Springer, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 203.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Peckmann, J
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Tehler, Anders
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Broman, C
    Bach, W
    Behrens, K
    Reitner, J
    Bottcher, M.E
    Norback Ivarsson, L
    Zygomycetes in Vesicular Basanites from Vesteris Seamount, Greenland Basin - A New Type of Cryptoendolithic Fungi2015In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, article id e0133368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungi have been recognized as a frequent colonizer of subseafloor basalt but a substantial understanding of their abundance, diversity and ecological role in this environment is still lacking. Here we report fossilized cryptoendolithic fungal communities represented by mainly Zygomycetes and minor Ascomycetes in vesicles of dredged volcanic rocks (basa- nites) from the Vesteris Seamount in the Greenland Basin. Zygomycetes had not been reported from subseafloor basalt previously. Different stages in zygospore formation are documented in the studied samples, representing a reproduction cycle. Spore structures of both Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes are mineralized by romanechite-like Mn oxide phases, indicating an involvement in Mn(II) oxidation to form Mn(III,VI) oxides. Zygospores still exhibit a core of carbonaceous matter due to their resistance to degradation. The fungi are closely associated with fossiliferous marine sediments that have been introduced into the vesicles. At the contact to sediment infillings, fungi produced haustoria that penetrated and scavenged on the remains of fragmented marine organisms. It is most likely that such marine debris is the main carbon source for fungi in shallow volcanic rocks, which favored the establishment of vital colonies. 

  • 204.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sallstedt, Therese
    Carlsson, Diana
    Morphological biosignatures in volcanic rocks - applicationsfor life detection on Mars2019In: Frontiers in Earth ScienceArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schnürer, Anna
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Neubeck, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Stockholm University.
    Anaerobic fungi: a potential source of biological H2 in the oceanic crust.2016In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 7, no 674, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent recognition of fungi in the oceanic igneous crust challenges the understanding of this environment as being exclusively prokaryotic and forces reconsiderations of the ecology of the deep biosphere. Anoxic provinces in the igneous crust are abundant and increase with age and depth of the crust. The presence of anaerobic fungi in deep-sea sediments and on the seafloor introduces a type of organism with attributes of geobiological significance not previously accounted for. Anaerobic fungi are best known from the rumen of herbivores where they produce molecular hydrogen, which in turn stimulates the growth of methanogens. The symbiotic cooperation between anaerobic fungi and methanogens in the rumen enhance the metabolic rate and growth of both. Methanogens and other hydrogen-consuming anaerobic archaea are known from subseafloor basalt; however, the abiotic production of hydrogen is questioned to be sufficient to support such communities. Alternatively, biologically produced hydrogen could serve as a continuous source. Here, we propose anaerobic fungi as a source of bioavailable hydrogen in the oceanic crust, and a close interplay between anaerobic fungi and hydrogen-driven prokaryotes.

  • 206.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. University of Southern Denmark, Department of Biology and Nordic Center for Earth Evolution, Campusvej 55, Odense M, DK-5230, Denmark.
    Skogby, Henrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Phichaikamjornwut, Bongkot
    Gems and Jewelry Program, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand .
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Siljeström, Sandra
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials/Chemistry and Materials, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ounchanum, Prayote
    Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Boonsong, Apichet
    Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
    Kruachanta, M
    Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand .
    Marone, Federica
    Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Belivanova, Veneta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sara, Holmström
    Stockholm University, Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Intricate tunnels in garnets from soils and rivere sediments in Thailand - possible endolithic microborings2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0200351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Garnets from disparate geographical environments and origins such as oxidized soils and river sediments in Thailand host intricate systems of microsized tunnels that significantly decrease the quality and value of the garnets as gems. The origin of such tunneling has previously been attributed to abiotic processes. Here we present physical and chemical remains of endolithic microorganisms within the tunnels and discuss a probable biological origin of the tunnels. Extensive investigations with synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) reveal morphological indications of biogenicity that further support a euendolithic interpretation. We suggest that the production of the tunnels was initiated by a combination of abiotic and biological processes, and that at later stages biological processes came to dominate. In environments such as river sediments and oxidized soils garnets are among the few remaining sources of bio-available Fe2+, thus it is likely that microbially mediated boring of the garnets has trophic reasons. Whatever the reason for garnet boring, the tunnel system represents a new endolithic habitat in a hard silicate mineral otherwise known to be resistant to abrasion and chemical attack.

  • 207. Jackson, Marie
    et al.
    Couper, Samantha
    Stan, S
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Czabaj, M
    Tamura, N
    Parkinson, D
    Miyagi, L.M.
    Moore, James
    Authigenic mineral textures in submarine 1979 basalt drill core, Surtsey volcano, Iceland2019In: Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, ISSN 1525-2027, E-ISSN 1525-2027, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 3751-3773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Micrometer‐scale maps of authigenic microstructures in submarine basaltic tuff from a 1979 Surtsey volcano, Iceland, drill core acquired 15 years after eruptions terminated describe the initial alteration of oceanic basalt in a low‐temperature hydrothermal system. An integrative investigative approach uses synchrotron source X‐ray microdiffraction, microfluoresence, micro‐computed tomography, and scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with Raman spectroscopy to create finely resolved spatial frameworks that record a continuum of alteration in glass and olivine. Microanalytical maps of vesicular and fractured lapilli in specimens from 157.1‐, 137.9‐, and 102.6‐m depths and borehole temperatures of 83, 93.9, and 141.3 °C measured in 1980, respectively, describe the production of nanocrystalline clay mineral, zeolites, and Al‐tobermorite in diverse microenvironments. Irregular alteration fronts at 157.1‐m depth resemble microchannels associated with biological activity in older basalts. By contrast, linear microstructures with little resemblance to previously described alteration features have nanocrystalline clay mineral (nontronite) and zeolite (amicite) texture. The crystallographic preferred orientation rotates around an axis parallel to the linear feature. Raman spectra indicating degraded and poorly ordered carbonaceous matter of possible biological origin are associated with nanocrystalline clay mineral in a crystallographically oriented linear microstructure in altered olivine at 102.6 m and with subcircular nanoscale cavities in altered glass at 137.9‐m depth. Although evidence for biotic processes is inconclusive, the integrated analyses describe the complex organization of previously unrecognized mineral texture in very young basalt. They provide a foundational mineralogical reference for longitudinal, time‐lapse characterizations of palagonitized basalt in oceanic environments.

  • 208. Jackson, Marie
    et al.
    Gudmundson, Magnus
    Bach, Wolfgang
    Cappeletti, P
    Coleman, Nicole
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Jonasson, K
    Jörgensen, Steffen
    Marteinson, M.L.
    McPhie, V.
    Moore, James
    Nielson, Daniel
    Rhodes, J.
    Rispoli, C
    Schiffman, Peter
    Stefansson, Andri
    Turke, Andreas
    Vanorio, T
    Weisenberg, T.B.
    White, James
    Zierenberg, R.
    Zimanowski, B
    Time-lapse characterization of hydrothermal seawater and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra at Surtsey volcano2015In: Scientific Drilling, ISSN 1816-8957, E-ISSN 1816-3459, Vol. 20, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) project will drill through the 50-yearold edifice of Surtsey Volcano, the youngest of the Vestmannaeyjar Islands along the south coast of Iceland, to perform interdisciplinary time-lapse investigations of hydrothermal and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra. The volcano, created in 1963–1967 by submarine and subaerial basaltic eruptions, was first drilled in 1979. In October 2014, a workshop funded by the ICDP convened 24 scientists from 10 countries for 3 and a half days on Heimaey Island to develop scientific objectives, site the drill holes, and organize logistical support. Representatives of the Surtsey Research Society and Environment Agency of Iceland also participated. Scientific themes focus on further determinations of the structure and eruptive processes of the type locality of Surtseyan volcanism, descriptions of changes in fluid geochemistry and microbial colonization of the subterrestrial deposits since drilling 35 years ago, and monitoring the evolution of hydrothermal and biological processes within the tephra deposits far into the future through the installation of a Surtsey subsurface observatory. The tephra deposits provide a geologic analog for developing specialty concretes with pyroclastic rock and evaluating their long-term performance under diverse hydrothermal conditions.

  • 209. Jacquet, Sarah, M.
    et al.
    Brougham, Thomas
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Jago, James, B.
    Laurie, John, R.
    Betts, Marissa, J.
    Topper, Timothy, P.
    Brock, Glenn, A.
    Watsonella crosbyi from the lower Cambrian (Terreneuvian, Stage 2) Normanville Group in South Australia2016In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correlation of lower Cambrian strata is often confounded by provincialism of key fauna. The widespread occurrence of themicromollusc Watsonella crosbyi Grabau, 1900 is therefore an important biostratigraphic signpost with potential for international correlation of lower Cambrian successions. Previous correlations of W. crosbyi from Australia (Normanville Group) suggested an Atdabanian- to Botoman-equivalent age. However, in the upper part of the Mount Terrible Formation, stratigraphic ranges of W. crosbyi and Aldanella sp. cf. golubevi overlap prior to the incoming of vertically burrowed ‘piperock’, which is indicative of an age no earlier than Cambrian Stage 2. The stratigraphic range of W. crosbyi in the Normanville Group, South Australia correlates with the ranges of the taxon in China, France, Mongolia and Siberia (though not Newfoundland). The new Australian data add further support for considering the first occurrence of W. crosbyi a good potential candidate for defining the base of Cambrian Stage 2. The stratigraphic range of W. crosbyi through the lower Cambrian Normanville Group has been determined based on collections from measured sections. Although rare, W. crosbyi is part of an assemblage of micromolluscs including Bemella sp., Parailsanella sp. cf. murenica and a sinistral form of Aldanella (A. sp. cf. A. golubevi). Other fauna present include Australohalkieria sp., Eremactis mawsoni, chancelloriids and Cupitheca sp.

  • 210.
    JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Institute of Biology, University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland;.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    An enigmatic fossil penguin from the Eocene of Antarctica2017In: Polar Research, ISSN 0800-0395, E-ISSN 1751-8369, Vol. 36, no 1, article id 1291086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tarsometatarsi are key skeletal elements in penguin palaeontology. They constitute, among others, type specimens of all 10 widely accepted species of fossil penguins from the Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour Island (Graham Land, Antarctic Peninsula). Here, we report on a recently collected large-sized tarsometatarsus from this formation that represents a new morphotype. We are convinced that the morphotype corresponds to a new species, but the material is too scarce for a taxonomic act. Undoubtedly, the bone discussed here is a valuable addition to our knowledge on diversity of early penguins.

  • 211. Jadwiszczak, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Aspects of diversity in early Antarctic penguins2011In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 212. JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    First partial skeleton of Delphinornis larseni Wiman, 1905, a slender-footed penguin from the Eocene of Antarctic Peninsula2019In: Palaeontologia Electronica, ISSN 1935-3952, E-ISSN 1094-8074Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 213. JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    First report on quill pits in early penguins2016In: Antarctic Science, ISSN 0954-1020, E-ISSN 1365-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 214. Jakubowicz, Michal
    et al.
    Dopieralska, Jolanta
    Kaim, Andrzej
    Skupien, Petr
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Belka, Zdzislaw
    Nd isotope composition of seep carbonates: towards a new approach for constraining subseafloor fluid circulation at hydrocarbon seeps2018In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 503, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 215. Jenkins, Robert
    et al.
    Kaim, Andrzej
    Hikida, Yoshinori
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Four new species of the Jurassic to Cretaceous seep-restricted bivalve Caspiconcha and implications for the history of chemosynthetic communities2018In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 92, p. 596-610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216. Jenks, S.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taxonomy and systematics of living hyaenas (family Hyaenidae)1998In: Hyaenas: status survey and conservation action plan / [ed] Mills, M. G. L. & Hofer, H., Gland: IUCN , 1998, p. 8-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kimura, Yuri
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Tomida, Yukimitsu
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac
    Institut Català de Paleontologia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 218.
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Schulz-Kornas, Ellen
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
    Corfe, Ian
    University of Helsinki.
    Martin, Thomas
    Universität Bonn.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Schultz, Julia A.
    Universität Bonn.
    Complementary approaches to tooth wear analysisin Tritylodontidae (Synapsida, Mammaliamorpha)reveal a generalist diet.2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 1-24, article id e0220188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoscopic microwear and 3D surface texture analyses on the cheek teeth of ten Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous tritylodontid (Mammaliamorpha) taxa of small/medium to large body size suggest that all were generalist feeders and none was a dietary specialist adapted to herbivory. There was no correspondence between body size and food choice. Stereomicroscopic microwear analysis revealed predominantly fine wear features with numerous small pits and less abundant fine scratches as principal components. Almost all analyzed facets bear some coarser microwear features, such as coarse scratches, large pits, puncture pits and gouges pointing to episodic feeding on harder food items or exogenous effects (contamination of food with soil grit and/or dust), or both. 3D surface texture analysis indicates predominantly fine features with large void volume, low peak densities, and various stages of roundness of the peaks. We interpret these features to indicate consumption of food items with low to moderate intrinsic abrasiveness and can exclude regular rooting, digging or caching behavior. Possible food items include plant vegetative parts, plant reproductive structures (seeds and seed-bearing organs), and invertebrates (i.e., insects). Although the tritylodontid tooth morphology and auto-occlusion suggest plants as the primary food resource, our results imply a wider dietary range including animal matter.

  • 219. Kappelman, J.
    et al.
    Sen, S.
    Fortelius, M.
    Duncan, A.
    Alpagut, B.
    Crabaugh, J.
    Gentry, A.
    Lunkka, J.-P.
    McDowell, F.
    Solounias, N.
    Viranta, S.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Chronology and biostratigraphy of the Miocene Sinap Formation of Central Turkey1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 78-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 220.
    Kase, Tomoki
    et al.
    National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo.
    Isaji, Shinji
    Natural History Museum and Institute, Chiba.
    Aguilar, Yolanda
    Mines and Geosciences Bureau, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A large new Wareniconcha (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) from a Pliocene methane seep deposit in Leyte, Philippines2019In: The Nautilus, ISSN 0028-1344, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Kear, Benjamin
    et al.
    Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University.
    Lindgren, Johan
    Department of Geology, Lund University.
    Jörn Hurum, Jörn
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo.
    Milan, Jesper
    Geomuseum Faxe/Østsjællands Museum.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    An introduction to the Mesozoic biotas of Scandinavia and its Arctic territories2016In: Geological Society, London, Special Publications, ISSN ISSN 0305-8719, Vol. 434, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesozoic biotas of Scandinavia have been studied for nearly two centuries. However, the last 15 years have witnessed an explosive advance in research, most notably on the richly fossiliferous Triassic (Olenekian–Carnian) and Jurassic (Tithonian) Lagersta¨tten of the Norwegian Arctic Svalbard archipelago, Late Cretaceous (Campanian) Kristianstad Basin and Vomb Trough of Skåne in southern Sweden, and the UNESCO heritage site at Stevns Klint in Denmark – the latter constituting one of the most complete Cretaceous–Palaeogene (Maastrichtian–Danian) boundary sections known globally. Other internationally significant deposits include earliest (Induan) and latest Triassic (Norian–Rhaetian) strata from the Danish autonomous territory of Greenland, and the Early Jurassic (Sinemurian–Pliensbachian) to Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) rocks of southern Sweden and the Danish Baltic island of Bornholm, respectively. Marine palaeocommunities are especially well documented, and comprise prolific benthic macroinvertebrates, together with pelagic cephalopods, chondrichthyans, actinopterygians and aquatic amniotes (ichthyopterygians, sauropterygians and mosasauroids). Terrestrial plant remains (lycophytes, sphenophytes, ferns, pteridosperms, cycadophytes, bennettitaleans and ginkgoes), including exceptionally well-preserved carbonized flowers, are also world famous, and are occasionally associated with faunal traces such as temnospondyl amphibian bones and dinosaurian footprints. While this collective documented record is substantial, much still awaits discovery. Thus, Scandinavia and its Arctic territories represent some of the most exciting prospects for future insights into the spectacular history of Mesozoic life and environments.

  • 222.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A biogeographic network reveals evolutionary links between deep sea hydrothermal vent and methane seep faunas2016In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 283, article id 20162337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reply to Smith et al.: Network analysis reveals connectivity patterns in the continuum of reducing ecosystems2017In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, article id 20171644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of whale falls in the connectivity among, and adaptation to, reducing ecosystems in the deep sea has been the matter of a long debate. Hydrothermal vents are the most extreme among the reducing habitats in terms of temperature, metal concentrations and in their geographical isolation, and it is hence thought that stepping stones are needed to reach them. As new types of reducing habitats are being discovered, they are now increasingly seen as a ‘continuum of reducing ecosystems’. Taking this concept seriously implies that any habitat type within this continuum could provide connectivity to any other. Thus rather than focusing just on whales, I will address the issues raised by Smith et al. in the context of the question ‘who provides connectivity with whom, and to which extent?’

  • 224.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reply to Smith et al.: Network analysis reveals connectivity patterns in the continuum of reducing ecosystems2017In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, article id 20171644Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Three new bivalve genera from Triassic hydrocarbon seep deposits in southern Turkey2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 221-234Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Using network analysis to trace the evolution of biogeography through geologic time: A case study2017In: Geology, ISSN 0091-7613, E-ISSN 1943-2682, Vol. 45, p. 711-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographic distribution of organisms has continuously changed through Earth’s

    history as plate tectonics changed the configurations of land masses, ocean basins, and climate

    zones. Yet, methods to investigate this dynamic through geologic time are limited. Here,

    network analysis is used to explore and to visualize the biogeographic history of brachiopods

    through the entire Triassic period. Many previously recognized biogeographic provinces are

    found, and in addition, the stratigraphic ranges of these provinces were identified. Provinces

    in the Tethys Ocean show the lowest degree of connectedness, which can be linked to higher

    evolutionary rates in this tropical ocean basin and possibly also to higher habitat heterogeneity.

    Stratigraphically, the Tethyan provinces are separated largely along the boundaries of

    the Early, Middle, and Late Triassic. This suggests that the events resulting in faunal changes

    among the index fossils used to define these sub-periods also affected the brachiopods. However,

    through the ~50 m.y. of the Triassic period, geographic proximity played a greater role

    in producing faunal similarity than proximity in geologic age. Thus network analysis is a

    viable tool to better understand the dynamic evolution of biogeography through geologic time.

  • 227.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Altamirano, Ali
    Museo de Historia Natural e Universidad Nacional Mayor San Marcos (MUSM).
    Birgel, Daniel
    Universität Hamburg.
    Helen, Coxall
    Stockholm University.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Peckmann, Jörn
    Fossiliferous methane-seep deposits from the Cenozoic Talara Basin in northern Peru2019In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Amano, Kazutaka
    Jenkins, Robert G.
    Predation scar frequencies in chemosymbiotic bivalves at an Oligocene seep deposit and their potential relation to inferred sulfide tolerances2016In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 453, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hansen, Bent
    Cenozoic methane-seep faunas of the Caribbean region2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0140788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted ‘Joes River fauna’ consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted ‘Bath Cliffs fauna’ containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema). In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman’s Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical ‘Cenozoic’ lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large lucinids because they are only facultative chemosymbiotic and need to derive a significant proportion of their nutrition from suspended organic matter.

  • 230.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Krystyn, Leopold
    Department of Palaeontology, Vienna University, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Demirtaş, Ferdi
    Department of Geological Engineering, Akdeniz University, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.
    Koşun, Erdal
    Department of Geological Engineering, Akdeniz University, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.
    Peckmann, Jörn
    Institute for Geology, Universität Hamburg, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.
    Late Triassic mollusk-dominated hydrocarbon-seep deposits from Turkey2017In: Geology, ISSN 0091-7613, E-ISSN 1943-2682, Vol. 44, p. 751-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and hydrocarbon seeps host unique ecosystems relying on geochemical energy rather than photosynthesis. Whereas the fossil and evolutionary history of these ecosystems is increasingly well known from the Cretaceous onward, their earlier history remains poorly understood and brachiopods are considered to have played a dominant role during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Here we report five new hydrocarbon-seep deposits from the Upper Triassic Kasımlar shales in southern Turkey. The pyritiferous seep limestones predominantly consist of 13C-depleted micrite with δ13C values as low as −10.4‰, and contain only sparse 13C-depleted rim cement (δ13C as low as −12.0‰), interpreted to result from the recrystallization of banded and botryoidal crystal aggregates of fibrous cement. The geologic ages of the studied seep deposits were determined as late Carnian and early Norian using conodonts. The associated fauna is dominated by modiomorphid and anomalodesmatan bivalves, and also includes a diversity of gastropods and the dimerelloid brachiopod Halorella. These faunal assemblages allow a comparison between seep faunas from the two major Triassic ocean basins—the present assemblages being from Tethys, and the only previously known examples being from eastern Panthalassa—and indicate that a cosmopolitan, seep-restricted fauna as in the present-day oceans has existed since the Late Triassic. With almost 20 species, the seep fauna of the Kasımlar shales approaches the diversity of Cretaceous to present-day seep faunas, further emphasizing the ecological similarity of seep faunas since the early Mesozoic. Our findings also highlight that brachiopods and bivalves had a more complex history of coexistence at seeps than currently appreciated.

  • 231.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Peckmann, Jörn
    Resource partitioning among brachiopods and bivalves at ancient hydrocarbon seeps: A hypothesis2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 9, article id e0221887Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 232.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sami, Marco
    Taviani, Marco
    A serpulid-Anodontia-dominated methane-seep deposit from the Miocene of northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taviani, Marco
    Institute of Marine Sciences, Italian National Research Council, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna, Italy.
    Chemosymbiotic bivalves from Miocene methane-seep carbonates in Italy2017In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 91, p. 444-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eleven species of chemosymbiotic bivalves are reported from middle to late Miocene methane seep deposits (‘Calcari a Lucina’) in the Italian Apennines, including seven new species and one new genus. The new species are Bathymodiolus (s.l.) moroniae and B. (s.l.) miomediterraneus among the Bathymodiolinae and Archivesica aharoni, A. apenninica, A. strigarum, and ‘Pliocardia’ italica among the Vesicomyidae; specimens from the middle Miocene of Deruta are reported as Archivesica aff. aharoni. Samiolus iohannesbaptistae new genus new species is introduced for an unusual mytilid with a commarginally ribbed surface, which might be the first non-bathymodiolin mytilid obligate to the seep environment. The two large lucinid species from which these deposits derived their informal name ‘Calcari a Lucina’ are identified as Meganodontia hoernea (Des Moulins, 1868) and Lucinoma perusina (Sacco, 1901). With Chanellaxinus sp., we report the first thyasirid from a Neogene deep-water seep deposit in Italy and the first fossil occurrence of this genus.

  • 234.
    Kiel, Steffen
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Taviani, Marco
    Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the late Pliocene Stirone River hydrocarbon seep complex in northern Italy2018In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 63, p. 557-568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 235. KIMURA, Yuri
    et al.
    TOMIDA, Yukimitsu
    Kalthoff, Daniela
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    CASANOVAS-VILAR, Isaac
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new endemic genus of eomyid rodents from the early Miocene of Japan2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 236. Kitchener, A.C.
    et al.
    Breitenmoser-Würsten, C.
    Eizirik, E.
    Gentry, A.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wilting, A.
    Yamaguchi, N.
    A revised taxonomy of the Felidae: The final report of the Cat Classification Task Force of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group2017In: Cat News, ISSN 1027-2992Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     1. The current classification of the Felidae was reviewed by a panel of 22 experts divided into core, expert and review groups, which make up the Cat Classification Task Force CCTF of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group.

    2. The principal aim of the CCTF was to produce a consensus on a revised classification of the Felidae for use by the IUCN.

    3. Based on current published research, the CCTF has fully revised the classification of the Felidae at the level of genus, species and subspecies.

    4. A novel traffic-light system was developed to indicate certainty of each taxon based on morphological, molecular, biogeographical and other evidence. A concordance of good evidence in the three principal categories was required to strongly support the acceptance of a taxon.

    5. Where disagreements exist among members of the CCTF, these have been highlighted in the accounts for each species. Only further research will be able to answer the potential conflicts in existing data.

    6. A total of 14 genera, 41 species and 80 subspecies are recognised by most members of the CCTF, which is a considerable change from the classification proposed by Wozencraft (2005), the last major revision of the Felidae.

    7. Future areas of taxonomic research have been highlighted in order to answer current areas of uncertainty.

    8. This classification of the Felidae will be reviewed every five years unless a major new piece of research requires a more rapid revision for the conservation benefit of felid species at risk of extinction.

  • 237. Klug, Christian
    et al.
    Pohle, Alexander
    Kiel, Steffen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Kröger, Björn
    A fossilized marble run: the peculiar taphonomy of Ordovician diploporitan blastozoans from Sweden2018In: Swiss Journal of Geosciences, ISSN 1661-8726, E-ISSN 1661-8734, Vol. 137, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238. Koenigswald, W. v.
    et al.
    Werdelin, LarsSwedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Mammal Migrations and Dispersal Events in the Quaternary of Europe1992Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Clausen, Sébastien
    Gubanov, Alexander
    Malinky, John M.
    Peel, John S.
    A Middle Cambrian fauna of skeletal fossils from the Kuonamka Formation, northern Siberia.2011In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 123-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of mineralized skeletal fossils containing molluscs, hyoliths, chancelloriids, protoconodonts, lobopods, paleoscolecids, bradoriids, echinoderms and hexactinellid sponges is described from the middle Cambrian part of the Kuonamka Formation, exposed along the Malaya Kuonamka and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers, northern Siberian Platform. The sampled succession is attributed to the Kuonamkites and lower Tomagnostus fissus–Paradoxides sacheri biozones of the Amgan Stage of Siberia, correlated with Series 3, Stage 5—lower Drumian Stage of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian. This work complements descriptions of molluscs from the same samples published by Gubanov et al. (2004) with additional material. It contains forms in common with coeval faunas from Australia, China, Western Gondwana, Avalonia, Laurentia and Baltica, increasing potential for global biostratigraphic correlation and understanding of palaeogeographic connections.

  • 240.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Clausen, Sébastien
    Université de Lille.
    Vendrasco, Michael J.
    California State University, Fullerton, CA.
    An early Cambrian fauna of skeletal fossils from the Emyaksin Formation, northern Siberia.2015In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 421-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assemblage of mineralised skeletal fossils containing molluscs, hyoliths, halkieriids, chancelloriids, tommotiids, lobopodians, paleoscolecids, bradoriids, echinoderms, anabaritids, hyolithelminths, hexactinnelid, and heteractinid sponges is described from the early Cambrian Emyaksin Formation exposed along the Malaya Kuonamka and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers, eastern flanks of the Anabar Uplift, northern Siberian Platform. The sampled succession is attributed to the Tommotian–Botoman Stages of Siberia and correlated with Stage 2 of Series 1–Stage 4 of Series 2 of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian. Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy is applied herein for regional correlation. The fauna contains the earliest Siberian and probably global first appearances of lobopodians, paleoscolecids, and echinoderms, and includes elements in common with coeval faunas from Gondwana, Laurentia, and Baltica. For the first time from Siberia, the latest occurrence of anabaritids is documented herein from the Atdabanian Stage. Problematic calcium phosphatic sclerites of Fengzuella zhejiangensis have not been previously known from outside China. The sellate sclerites, Camenella garbowskae and mitral sclerites, C. kozlowskii are unified within one species, C. garbowskae. In addition to more common slender sclerites, Rhombocorniculum insolutum include broad calcium phosphatic sclerites. A number of fossils described herein demonstrate excellent preservation of fine details of skeletal microstructures. Based on new microstructural data, sclerites of Rhombocorniculum are interpreted as chaetae of the type occurring in annelids. A new mollusc Enigmaconus? pyramidalis Kouchinsky and Vendrasco sp. nov. and a hyolith Triplicatella papilio Kouchinsky sp. nov. are described.

  • 241.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Landing, Ed
    New York State Museum.
    Steiner, Michael
    Freie Universität Berlin.
    Vendrasco, Michael
    Pasadena City College.
    Ziegler, Karen
    University of New Mexico.
    Terreneuvian stratigraphy and faunas from the Anabar Uplift, Siberia.2017In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 311-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Kouchinsky, Artem
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Runnegar, Bruce
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Steiner, Michael
    Vendrasco, Michael
    Chronology of early Cambrian biomineralization.2012In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 221-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on the first appearances of major animal groups with mineralized skeletons on the Siberian Platform and worldwide are revised and summarized herein with references to an improved carbon isotope stratigraphy and radiometric dating in order to reconstruct the Cambrian radiation (popularly known as the ‘Cambrian explosion’) with a higher precision and provide a basis for the definition of Cambrian Stages 2 to 4. The Lophotrochozoa and, probably, Chaetognatha were first among protostomians to achieve biomineralization during the Terreneuvian Epoch, mainly the Fortunian Age. Fast evolutionary radiation within the Lophotrochozoa was followed by radiation of the sclerotized and biomineralized Ecdysozoa during Stage 3. The first mineralized skeletons of the Deuterostomia, represented by echinoderms, appeared in the middle of Cambrian Stage 3. The fossil record of sponges and cnidarians suggests that they acquired biomineralized skeletons in the late Neoproterozoic, but diversification of both definite sponges and cnidarians was in parallel to that of bilaterians. The distribution of calcium carbonate skeletal mineralogies from the upper Ediacaran to lower Cambrian reflects fluctuations in the global ocean chemistry and shows that the Cambrian radiation occurred mainly during a time of aragonite and high-magnesium calcite seas.

  • 243. Kriwet, Jürgen
    et al.
    Engelbrecht, Andrea
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Reguero, Marcelo
    Pfaff, Cathrin
    Ultimate Eocene (Priabonian) chondrichthyans (Holocephali, Elasmobranchii) of Antarctica2016In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT—The Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, is known for its remarkable wealth of fossil remains of chondrichthyans and teleosts. Chondrichthyans seemingly were dominant elements in the Antarctic Paleogene fish fauna, but decreased in abundance from middle to late Eocene, during which time remains of bony fishes increase. This decline of chondrichthyans at the end of the Eocene generally is related to sudden cooling of seawater, reduction in shelf area, and increasing shelf depth due to the onset of the Antarctic thermal isolation. The last chondrichthyan records known so far include a chimeroid tooth plate from TELM 6 (Lutetian) and a single pristiophorid rostral spine from TELM 7 (Priabonian). Here, we present new chondrichthyan records of Squalus, Squatina, Pristiophorus, Striatolamia, Palaeohypotodus, Carcharocles, and Ischyodus from the upper parts of TELM 7 (Priabonian), including the first record of Carcharocles sokolovi from Antarctica. This assemblage suggests that chondrichthyans persisted much longer in Antarctic waters despite rather cool sea surface temperatures of approximately 5C. The final disappearance of chondrichthyans at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary concurs with abrupt ice sheet formation in Antarctica. Diversity patterns of chondrichthyans throughout the La Meseta Formation appear to be related to climatic conditions rather than plate tectonics.

  • 244. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.
    Herries, Andrew I. R.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Bamford, Marion K.
    Berger, Lee R.,
    The carnivore guild circa 1.98 million years: biodiversity and implications for the palaeoenvironment at Malapa, South Africa2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 245. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Hartstone-Rose, Adam
    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.
    Berger, Lee R.
    Carnivoran remains from the Malapa hominin site, South Africa2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 11, p. e26940-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent discoveries at the new hominin-bearing deposits of Malapa, South Africa, have yielded a rich faunal assemblage associated with the newly described hominin taxon Australopithecus sediba. Dating of this deposit using U-Pb and palaeomagnetic methods has provided an age of 1.977 Ma, being one of the most accurately dated, time constrained deposits in the Plio-Pleistocene of southern Africa. To date, 81 carnivoran specimens have been identified at this site including members of the families Canidae, Viverridae, Herpestidae, Hyaenidae and Felidae. Of note is the presence of the extinct taxon Dinofelis cf. D. barlowi that may represent the last appearance date for this species. Extant large carnivores are represented by specimens of leopard (Panthera pardus) and brown hyaena (Parahyaena brunnea). Smaller carnivores are also represented, and include the genera Atilax and Genetta, as well as Vulpes cf. V. chama. Malapa may also represent the first appearance date for Felis nigripes (Black-footed cat). The geochronological age of Malapa and the associated hominin taxa and carnivoran remains provide a window of research into mammalian evolution during a relatively unknown period in South Africa and elsewhere. In particular, the fauna represented at Malapa has the potential to elucidate aspects of the evolution of Dinofelis and may help resolve competing hypotheses about faunal exchange between East and Southern Africa during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene.

  • 246. Kuhn, Brian F.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Steininger, Christine
    Fossil Hyaenidae from Cooper’s Cave South Africa, and the palaeoenvironmental implications2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A review of the genus Chasmaporthetes Hay, 1921 (Carnivora, Hyaenidae)1988In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 8, p. 46-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 248. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Relationships between North and South American Smilodon1990In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 10, p. 158-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The relationships of Lynx shansius Teilhard1984In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, Vol. 21, p. 129-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Kustatscher, Evelyn
    et al.
    Museum of Nature South Tyrol, Bindergasse 1, 39100 Bozen/Bolzano, Italy.
    Ash, Sidney
    Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Northrop Hall, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA.
    Karasev, Eugeny
    Borissiak Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya 123, Moscow 117647, Russia.
    Pott, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Vajda, Vivi
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Yu, Jianxin
    State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, P.O.Box 430074, P.R. China.
    McLoughlin, Stephen
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Flora of The Late Triassic2017In: The Late Triassic World: Earth in a Time of Transition / [ed] Tanner, L.H., New York: Springer International Publishing , 2017, 1, p. 545-622Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Triassic was a crucial period of botanical evolutionary innovations and plant diversification. Key plant groups (Bennettitales, Czekanowskiales, Gnetales and several modern fern and conifer families) originated during this span of time, together with some taxa putatively related to angiosperms. The composition of the various plant assemblages shows a more homogeneous flora globally than during the Permian. Nonetheless two major floristic provinces are distinguishable during the Late Triassic (Gondwana and Laurussia) together with several subprovinces (two within Gondwana, nine within Laurussia), based on palyno- and macro-floras.The latter are differentiated by contrasting taxonomic composition and group abundances related to different climatic and regional environmental conditions. Many plant families and genera are widely distributed in the Late Triassic, at least in the respective hemispheres. Based on the array of preserved damage types on leaves and wood, insect faunas appear to have recovered from the end-Permian mass extinction by the Late Triassic, with a major expansion of herbivory in Gondwana. All modern functional feeding groups (FFG) were present by the Triassic, including external foliage feeding, piercing-and-sucking, galling, leaf mining and seed predation, with some evidence for the development of very specialized feeding traits and egg-laying strategies.

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