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  • 2051. Zamora, Samuel
    et al.
    Lefebvre, Bertrand
    Hosgör, Izzet
    Franzén, Christina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Nardin, Elise
    Fatka, Oldřich
    Álvaro, José Javier
    The Cambrian edrioasteroid Stromatocystites (Echinodermata): Systematics, palaeogeography, and palaeoecology.2015In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 417-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cambrian edrioasteroid Stromatocystites is reported and described from Spain, Sweden and Turkey. All previously known occurrences of the genus are critically reviewed, and S. flexibilis is reinterpreted as a junior synonym of S. pentangularis. Stromatocystites was biogeographically widespread and colonized different areas of Baltica, Gondwana (Arabian, eastern and western margins) and Laurentia (western Newfoundland). Stratigraphically, it ranges from Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4 to Cambrian Series 3, Drumian. Stromatocystites lived in quiet water environments with stabilized substrates. It was attached directly to the substrate by its aboral surface. As these environments were widespread throughout Baltica, Gondwana and Laurentia, availability of suitable substrates for larval settlement and oceanic palaeocurrents led to the successful development of Stromatocystites colonies.

  • 2052. Zanatta, Florian
    et al.
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Hedenäs, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Johansson, Victor
    Patiño, Jairo
    Lönnell, Niklas
    Hylander, Kristoffer
    Under which humidity conditions are moss spores released? A comparison between species with perfect and specialized peristomes2018In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, p. 11484-11491Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2053. Zaton, M
    et al.
    Niedzwiedzki, G
    Marynowski, L
    Benzerara, K
    Pott, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Cosmidis, J
    Krzykawski, T
    Filipiak, P
    Coprolites of Late Triassic carnivorous vertebrates from Poland: An integrative approach2015In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 430, p. 21-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vertebrate coprolites derived from Upper Triassic terrestrial deposits of southern Poland have been subjected to various analytical methods in order to retrieve information about their composition, producer’s diet and nature of the microscopic structures preserved in the groundmass. Morphologically, the coprolites have been classified into four morphotypes, of which only three were further analysed due to their good state of preservation. Their groundmass are composed of francolite, a carbonate-rich apatite, in which abundant coccoid structures are preserved. Based on various microscopic and organic geochemical techniques, they are interpreted as fossilized bacteria which could have mediated the phosphatization of the faeces. The thin sectioning revealed that the coprolites consist of those containing exclusively bone remains, and those preserving both bone and plant remains. Those coprolites preserving only vertebrate remains are suggestive for exclusive carnivorous diet of the producers. However, the interpretation of coprolites consisting of both vertebrate and plant remains is more debatable. Although they may attest to omnivory, it cannot be excluded that potential producers were carnivorous and occasionally ingested plants, or accidentally swallowed plant material during feeding. The latter may involve predation or scavenging upon other herbivorous animals. The potential producers may have been animals that foraged in or near aquatic habitats, such as semi-aquatic archosaurs and/or temnospondyls. This is supported by the presence of ostracode and other aquatic arthropod remains, and fish scales within the coprolites, as well as by the presence of specific biomarkers such as phytanic and pristanic acids, which are characteristic constituents of fish oil. The preservation of such labile organic compounds as sterols, palmitin, stearin or levoglucosan attests for rapid, microbially-mediated mineralization of the faeces at very early stages of diagenesis.

  • 2054.
    Zepeda Mendoza, Marie Lisandra
    et al.
    Natural History Museum of Denmark.
    Lundberg, Johannes
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Ivarsson, Magnus
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE).
    Campos, Paula
    University of Copenhagen.
    Nylander, Johan A. A.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Sallstedt, Thereese
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology. Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE).
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Metagenomic Analysis from the Interior of a Speleothem in Tjuv-Ante's Cave, Northern Sweden2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 1-23, article id e015177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speleothems are secondary mineral deposits normally formed by water supersaturated with calcium carbonate percolating into underground caves, and are often associated with low-nutrient and mostly non-phototrophic conditions. Tjuv-Ante’s cave is a shallow-depth cave formed by the action of waves, with granite and dolerite as major components, and opal-A and calcite as part of the speleothems, making it a rare kind of cave. We generated two DNA shotgun sequencing metagenomic datasets from the interior of a speleothem from Tjuv-Ante’s cave representing areas of old and relatively recent speleothem formation. We used these datasets to perform i) an evaluation of the use of these speleothems as past biodiversity archives, ii) functional and taxonomic profiling of the speleothem’s different formation periods, and iii) taxonomic comparison of the metagenomic results to previous microscopic analyses from a nearby speleothem of the same cave. Our analyses confirm the abundance of Actinobacteria and fungi as previously reported by microscopic analyses on this cave, however we also discovered a larger biodiversity. Interestingly, we identified photosynthetic genes, as well as genes related to iron and sulphur metabolism, suggesting the presence of chemoautotrophs. Furthermore, we identified taxa and functions related to biomineralization. However, we could not confidently establish the use of this type of speleothems as biological paleoarchives due to the potential leaching from the outside of the cave and the DNA damage that we propose has been caused by the fungal chemical etching.

  • 2055. Zhang, Chi
    et al.
    Rannala, Bruce
    Yang, Ziheng
    Bayesian species delimitation can be robust to guide tree inference errors2014In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 993-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2056. Zhang, Chi
    et al.
    Rannala, Bruce
    Yang, Ziheng
    Robustness of compound Dirichlet priors for Bayesian inference of branch lengths2012In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 779-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We modified the phylogenetic program MrBayes 3.1.2 to incorporate the compound Dirichlet priors for branch lengths proposed recently by Rannala, Zhu, and Yang (2012. Tail paradox, partial identifiability and influential priors in Bayesian branch length inference. Mol. Biol. Evol. 29:325-335.) as a solution to the problem of branch-length overestimation in Bayesian phylogenetic inference. The compound Dirichlet prior specifies a fairly diffuse prior on the tree length (the sum of branch lengths) and uses a Dirichlet distribution to partition the tree length into branch lengths. Six problematic data sets originally analyzed by Brown, Hedtke, Lemmon, and Lemmon (2010. When trees grow too long: investigating the causes of highly inaccurate Bayesian branch-length estimates. Syst. Biol. 59:145-161) are reanalyzed using the modified version of MrBayes to investigate properties of Bayesian branch-length estimation using the new priors. While the default exponential priors for branch lengths produced extremely long trees, the compound Dirichlet priors produced posterior estimates that are much closer to the maximum likelihood estimates. Furthermore, the posterior tree lengths were quite robust to changes in the parameter values in the compound Dirichlet priors, for example, when the prior mean of tree length changed over several orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that the compound Dirichlet priors may be useful for correcting branch-length overestimation in phylogenetic analyses of empirical data sets.

  • 2057. Zhang, Chi
    et al.
    Stadler, Tanja
    Klopfstein, Seraina
    Heath, Tracy A.
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Total-evidence dating under the fossilized birth–death process2016In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 228-249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2058. Zhang, Chi
    et al.
    Zhang, De-Xing
    Zhu, Tianqi
    Yang, Ziheng
    Evaluation of a Bayesian coalescent method of species delimitation2011In: Systematic Biology, ISSN 1063-5157, E-ISSN 1076-836X, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 747-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Bayesian coalescent-based method has recently been proposed to delimit species using multilocus genetic sequence data. Posterior probabilities of different species delimitation models are calculated using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. The method accounts for species phylogenies and coalescent events in both extant and extinct species and accommodates lineage sorting and uncertainties in the gene trees. Although the method is theoretically appealing, its utility in practical data analysis is yet to be rigorously examined. In particular, the analysis may be sensitive to priors on ancestral population sizes and on species divergence times and to gene flow between species. Here we conduct a computer simulation to evaluate the statistical performance of the method, such as the false negatives (the error of lumping multiple species into one) and false positives (the error of splitting one species into several). We found that the correct species model was inferred with high posterior probability with only one or two loci when 5 or 10 sequences were sampled from each population, or with 50 loci when only one sequence was sampled. We also simulated data allowing migration under a two-species model, a mainland-island model and a stepping-stone model to assess the impact of gene flow (hybridization or introgression). The behavior of the method was diametrically different depending on the migration rate. Low rates at < 0.1 migrants per generation had virtually no effect, so that the method, while assuming no hybridization between species, identified distinct species despite small amounts of gene flow. This behavior appears to be consistent with biologists' practice. In contrast, higher migration rates at ≥ 10 migrants per generation caused the method to infer one species. At intermediate levels of migration, the method is indecisive. Our results suggest that Bayesian analysis under the multispecies coalescent model may provide important insights into population divergences, and may be useful for generating hypotheses of species delimitation, to be assessed with independent information from anatomical, behavioral, and ecological data.

  • 2059. Zhang, Fucheng
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Zhou, Zhonghe
    Description of a new enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of Hebei, northern China2004In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 1097-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new enantiornithine fossil bird, Vescornis hebeiensis, nov. sp. from the Early Cretaceous of China. We refer Vescornis to the crown clade Euenantiornithes based on several characteristics observed in the thoracic girdle and wing. Vescornis also exhibits characteristics that separate it from other enantiornithine birds, such as the short alular phalanx, the vestigial manual claws, and the well-developed and long foot claws. These features suggest an adaptation towards an improved flight capability, while the ability of Vescornis to climb is reduced compared with many other enantiornithine birds.

  • 2060. Zhang, Ruiying
    et al.
    Song, Gang
    Qu, Yanhua
    Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
    Alström, Per
    Ramos, Raül
    Xing, Xiaoying
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Wang, Haitao
    Yang, Xiaojun
    Kristin, Anton
    Shestopalov, Alexander M
    Choe, Jae Chun
    Lei, Fumin
    Comparative phylogeography of two widespread magpies: importance of habitat preference and breeding behavior on genetic structure in China.2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 562-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historical geological events and climatic changes are believed to have played important roles in shaping the current distribution of species. However, sympatric species may have responded in different ways to such climatic fluctuations. Here we compared genetic structures of two corvid species, the Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus and the Eurasian Magpie Pica pica, both widespread but with different habitat dependence and some aspects of breeding behavior. Three mitochondrial genes and two nuclear introns were used to examine their co-distributed populations in East China and the Iberian Peninsula. Both species showed deep divergences between these two regions that were dated to the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene. In the East Chinese clade of C. cyanus, populations were subdivided between Northeast China and Central China, probably since the early to mid-Pleistocene, and the Central subclade showed a significant pattern of isolation by distance. In contrast, no genetic structure was found in the East China populations of P. pica. We suggest that the different patterns in the two species are at least partly explained by ecological differences between them, especially in habitat preference and perhaps also breeding behavior. These dissimilarities in life history traits might have affected the dispersal and survival abilities of these two species differently during environmental fluctuations.

  • 2061. Zhang, Z.
    et al.
    Gentry, A. W.
    Kakkinen, A.
    Liu, L.
    Lunkka, J.-P.
    Qiu, Z.
    Sen, S.
    Scott, R. S.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zheng, S.
    Fortelius, M.
    Land mammal faunal sequence of the late Miocene of China: New evidence from Lantian, Shaanxi Province2002In: Vertebrata PalAsiatica, Vol. 40, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2062.
    Zhang, Zhifei
    et al.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Fu, Dongjing
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Zhang, Xingliang
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Shu, Degan
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Han, Jian
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Liu, Jianni
    Wang, Haizhou
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Butler, Aodhan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Li, Guoxiang
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Nanjing, China.
    A sclerite-bearing stem group entoproct from the early Cambrian and its implications2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, no 1066, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lophotrochozoa includes disparate tentacle-bearing sessile protostome animals, which apparently appeared in the Cambrian explosion, but lack an uncontested fossil record. Here we describe abundant well preserved material of Cotyledion tylodes Luo et Hu, 1999, from the Cambrian (Series 2) Chengjiang deposits, reinterpreted here as a stem-group entoproct. The entoproct affinity is supported by the sessile body plan and interior soft anatomy. The body consists of an upper calyx and a lower elongate stalk with a distal holdfast. The soft anatomy includes a U-shaped gut with a mouth and aboral anus ringed by retractable marginal tentacles. Cotyledion differs from extant entoprocts in being larger, and having the calyx and the stalk covered by numerous loosely-spaced external sclerites. The description of entoprocts from the Chengjiang biota traces the ancestry of yet another lophotrochozoan phylum back to the Cambrian radiation, and has important implications for the earliest evolution of lophotrochozoans.

  • 2063.
    Zhang, Zhifei
    et al.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Li, Guoxiang
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Nanjing, China.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales.
    Balthasar, Uwe
    University of Glasgow.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fu, D.J.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Zhang, X.L.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Wang, Haizhou
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Butler, Aodhan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Zhang, Z.L.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Cao, C.Q.
    Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Nanjing, China.
    Han, J.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Liu, J.N.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    Shu, D.G.
    Northwest University, Xian, China.
    An early Cambrian agglutinated tubular lophophorate with brachiopod characters2014In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 4, no 4682, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The morphological disparity of lophotrochozoan phyla makes it difficult to predict the morphology of the last common ancestor. Only fossils of stem groups can help discover the morphological transitions that occurred along the roots of these phyla. Here, we describe a tubular fossil Yuganotheca elegans gen. et sp. nov. from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Chengjiang Lagersta¨tte (Yunnan, China) that exhibits an unusual combination of phoronid, brachiopod and tommotiid (Cambrian problematica) characters, notably a pair of agglutinated valves, enclosing a horseshoe-shaped lophophore, supported by a lower bipartite tubular attachment structure with a long pedicle with coelomic space. The terminal bulb of the pedicle provided anchorage in soft sediment. The discovery has important implications for the early evolution of lophotrochozoans, suggesting rooting of brachiopods into the sessile lophotrochozoans and the origination of their bivalved bauplan preceding the biomineralization of shell valves in crown brachiopods.

  • 2064.
    Zhang, Zhiliang
    et al.
    Northwest university.
    Skovsted, Christian
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zhang, Zhifei
    Northwest University.
    A hyolithid without helens preserving the oldest hyolith muscle scars; palaeobiology of Paramicrocornus from the Shujingtuo Formation (Cambrian Series 2) of South China2018In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 489, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hyolithid Paramicrocornus zhenbaensis from the lower Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2) Shuijingtuo Formation of southern Shaanxi and western Hubei provinces of the Yangtze Platform is well-preserved in three dimensions. The morphology of the conch and operculum of P. zhenbaensis shows that this species lacked helens, which are considered to be characteristic of hyolithids and hence Paramicrocornus may belong to a sister group of other hyolithids. The shell structure of P. zhenbaensis reveals close similarities to the shell structure of other hyolithids. Furthermore, the smaller size and non-radial orientation of tubules in the shell structure of the operculum also differ from that in orthothecid hyoliths, suggesting that this characteristic may be used to differentiate hyolithids and orthothecids. The phosphatized opercula of P. zhenbaensis exhibit a pair of muscle scars located close to the apex of the internal surface. These muscle scars, as well as similar structures in other hyolithids, probably served as attachment sites of muscles controlling the retraction of the tentaculate feeding organ recently discovered inhyolithids. Without helens, P. zhenbaensis may have been sessile with the conch partly buried in the sea floor.

  • 2065. Zhao, X
    et al.
    Fernández-Brime, Samantha
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Wedin, Mats
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany.
    Locke, M
    Leavitt, S.D.
    Lumbsch, H. Thorsten
    Using multi-locus sequence data for addressing species boundaries in commonly accepted lichen-forming fungal species.2017In: Organisms Diversity & Evolution, ISSN 1439-6092, E-ISSN 1618-1077, Vol. 17, p. 351-363Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2066. Zhou, Yihui
    et al.
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Yin, Ge
    Athanassiadis, Ioannis
    Wideqvist, Ulla
    Bignert, Anders
    Qiu, Yanling
    Zhu, Zhiliang
    Zhao, Jianfu
    Bergman, Åke
    Extensive organohalogen contamination in wildlife from a site in the Yangtze River Delta.2016In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 554-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental and human health concerns for organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) extend beyond the 23 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention. The current, intense industrial production and use of chemicals in China and their bioaccumulation makes Chinese wildlife highly suitable for the assessment of legacy, novel and emerging environmental pollutants. In the present study, six species of amphibians, fish and birds were sampled from paddy fields in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) were screened for OHCs. Some extensive contamination was found, both regarding number and concentrations of the analytes, among the species assessed. High concentrations of chlorinated paraffins were found in the snake, Short-tailed mamushi (range of 200-340 μg g(-)(1)lw), Peregrine falcon (8-59 μg g(-1)lw) and Asiatic toad (97 μg g(-)(1)lw). Novel contaminants and patterns were observed; octaCBs to decaCB made up 20% of the total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) content in the samples and new OHCs, substituted with 5-8 chlorines, were found but are not yet structurally confirmed. In addition, Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) and numerous other OHCs (DDTs, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexbromocyclododecane (HBCDD), chlordane, heptachlor, endosulfan and Mirex) were found in all species analyzed. These data show extensive chemical contamination of wildlife in the YRD with a suite of OHCs with both known and unknown toxicities, calling for further in-depth studies.

  • 2067. Zhou, Yihui
    et al.
    Yin, Ge
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Qiu, Yanling
    Bignert, Anders
    Zhu, Zhiliang
    Zhao, Jianfu
    Bergman, Åke
    A novel pollution pattern: Highly chlorinated biphenyls retained in Black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and Whiskered tern (Chlidonias hybrida) from the Yangtze River Delta.2016In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated diphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and their methylated counterparts (MeO-PBDEs) were determined in Black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) and Whiskered tern (Chlidonias hybrida) from two drinking water sources, e.g. Tianmu lake and East Tai lake in Yangtze River Delta, China. A novel PCBs contamination pattern was detected, including 11% and 6.9% highly chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs with eight to ten chlorines) in relation to total PCB concentrations in the Black-crowned night heron and Whiskered tern eggs, respectively. The predominating OCPs detected in the present study were 4,4'-DDE, with concentration range 280-650 ng g(-1) lw in Black-crowned night heron and 240-480 ng g(-1) lw in Whiskered tern, followed by β-HCH and Mirex. 6-MeO-BDE-90 and 6-MeO-BDE-99 are the two predominant congeners of MeO-PBDEs whereas 6-OH-BDE-47 contributes mostly to the OH-PBDEs in both species. Contamination level was considered as median or low level compared global data.

  • 2068. Zimmermann, Judith
    et al.
    Wentrup, Cecilia
    Sadowski, Miriam
    Blazejak, Anna
    Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R.
    Kleiner, Manuel
    Ott, Jörg A.
    Cronholm, Bodil
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    De Wit, Pierre
    Erseus, Christer
    Dubilier, Nicole
    Closely coupled evolutionary history of ecto- and endosymbionts from two distantly related animal phyla2016In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 25, no 13, p. 3203-3223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2069. Zintzen, Vincent
    et al.
    Roberts, Clive D.
    Shepherd, Lara
    Stewart, Andrew L.
    Struthers, Carl D.
    Anderson, Marti J.
    McVeagh, Margaret
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Review and phylogeny of the New Zealand hagfishes (Myxiniformes: Myxinidae), with a description of three new species2015In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 363-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hagfishes from New Zealand are reviewed and a phylogeny proposed using morphological and genetic data (DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene, COI, and the small subunit RNA, 16S). Eptatretus cryptus sp. nov. was previously confused with Eptatretus cirrhatus (Forster in Bloch & Schneider, 1801) because of their similar morphology, and is found from the Three Kings Islands to Stewart Island and in the eastern part of the Chatham Rise (at depths of 96–922 m). Eptatretus poicilus sp. nov. is endemic to the Three Kings Islands, where it is common and associated with soft sediment and deep-sea coral-sponge habitats (114–842 m). Neomyxine caesiovitta sp. nov. is a slender hagfish found along the east coast of the North Island south to the Chatham Rise (430–1083 m). A neotype is erected for E. cirrhatus (type locality: Breaksea Sound, Fiordland), occurring widely in New Zealand coastal, shelf, and slope waters (1–922 m), but not at the Three Kings Islands. Eptatetrus goliath Mincarone & Stewart, 2006, Neomyxine biniplicata (Richardson & Jowett, 1951), and Nemamyxine elongata Richardson, 1958 are further described using additional material. Rubicundus eos (Fernholm, 1991) is still only known from the holotype (type locality: Challenger Plateau). Genetic results showed that the New Zealand Eptatretus species form a monophyletic group within the subfamily Eptatretinae, indicating likely speciation from a single common ancestor within the area. Eptatretus poicilus sp. nov. is the sister species of E. cirrhatus, and E. cryptus sp. nov. is closely associated with the clade formed by these two species. Eptatretus goliath is most closely associated with Eptatretus minor Fernholm & Hubbs, 1981 (Gulf of Mexico), these two species basally diverging within New Zealand hagfishes. The endemic genus Neomyxine forms a well-supported monophyletic group of as yet uncertain position within the phylogenetic tree. A key to the New Zealand hagfishes, fresh colour photographs, distribution maps, and in situ video recordings are presented

  • 2070. Zohari, Siamak
    et al.
    Neimanis, Aleksija
    Härkönen, Tero
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Moraeus, Charlotta
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Valarcher, Jean-Francois
    Avian influenza A(H10N7) virus involvement in mass mortality of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in Sweden, March through October 20142014In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 19, no 46, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide the first scientific report of influenza A virus involvement in a mass mortality event among harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) off the west coast of Sweden. Avian influenza A (H10N7) virus was detected in the lungs of two affected animals. This subtype has not been reported in seals to date, nor has influenza A-associated mortality been reported in seals in Europe. Circulation of avian influenza viruses in mammals may have implications for public health.

  • 2071. Zsolt, Benko
    et al.
    Molnar, F.
    Lespinasse, M.
    Billström, Kjell
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pecskay, Z.
    Nemeth, T.
    Triassic fluid mobilization and epigenetic lead-zinc sulphide mineralization in the Transdanubian shear zone (Pannonian basin, Hungary)2014In: Geologica Carpathica, ISSN 1335-0552, E-ISSN 1336-8052, Vol. 65, p. 177-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combined fluid inclusion, fluid inclusion plane, lead isotope and K/Ar radiometric age dating work has been carried out on two lead-zinc mineralizations situated along the Periadriatic-Balaton Lineament in the central part of the Pannonian Basin, in order to reveal their age and genetics as well as temporal-spatial relationships to other lead-zinc fluorite mineralization in the Alp-Carpathian region. According to fluid inclusion studies, the formation of the quartz fluorite-galena-sphalerite veins in the Velence Mts is the result of mixing of low (0—12 NaCl equiv. wt. %) and high salinity (10—26 CaCl2 equiv. wt. %) brines. Well-crystallized (R3-type) illite associated with the mineralized hydrothermal veins indicates that the maximum temperature of the hydrothermal fluids could have been around 250 °C. K/Ar radiometric ages of illite, separated from the hydrothermal veins provided ages of 209—232 Ma, supporting the Mid- to Late-Triassic age of the hydrothermal fluid flow. Fluid inclusion plane studies have revealed that hydrothermal circulation was regional in the granite, but more intensive around the mineralized zones. Lead isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins in the Velence Mts (206Pb/204Pb = 18.278—18.363, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.622—15.690 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.439—38.587) and in Szabadbattyán (206Pb/204Pb = 18.286—18.348, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.667—15.736 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.552—38.781) form a tight cluster indicating similar, upper crustal source of the lead in the two mineralizations. The nature of mineralizing fluids, age of the fluid flow, as well as lead isotopic signatures of ore minerals point towards a genetic link between epigenetic carbonate-hosted stratiform-stratabound Alpine-type lead-zinc-fluorite deposits in the Southern and Eastern Alps and the studied deposits in the Velence Mts and at Szabadbattyán. In spite of the differences in host rocks and the depth of the ore precipitation, it is suggested that the studied deposits along the Periadriatic-Balaton Lineament in the Pannonian Basin and in the Alps belong to the same regional scale fluid flow system, which developed during the advanced stage of the opening of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. The common origin and ore formation process is more evident considering results of large-scale palinspastic reconstructions. These suggest, that the studied deposits in the central part of the Pannonian Basin were located in a zone between the Eastern and Southern Alps until the Early Paleogene and were emplaced to their current location due to northeastward escape of large crustal blocks from the Alpine collision zone.

  • 2072. Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Cibois, Alice
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data reveal the major lineages of starlings, mynas and related taxa.2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 333-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of the avian family Sturnidae and their placement within the Muscicapoidea clade using two nuclear (RAG-1 and myoglobin) and one mitochondrial gene (ND2). Among Muscicapoidea, we recovered three clades corresponding to the families Cinclidae, Muscicapidae and Sturnidae (sensu [Sibley, C.G., Monroe Jr., B.L., 1990. Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT]). Within the sturnoid lineage Mimini and Sturnini are sister groups, with Buphagus basal to them. We identified three major lineages of starlings: the Philippine endemic genus Rhabdornis, an Oriental-Australasian clade (genera Scissirostrum, Gracula, Mino, Ampeliceps, Sarcops, Aplonis), and an Afrotropical-Palaearctic clade (all African taxa, Sturnus and Acridotheres). We discuss the biogeographic implications of our findings and suggest an Asiatic origin for this family. The congruence between the age of major clades, estimated by NPRS, and palaeoclimatic data present evidence for the role of climatic changes in shaping present day distribution of the group.

  • 2073.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    A multi-gene phylogeny disentangles the chat-flycatcher complex (Aves: Muscicapidae)2010In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2074. Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Molecular and morphological evidences place the extinct New Zealand endemic Turnagra capensis in the Oriolidae.2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 414-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affinities of Piopio Turnagra capensis, an extinct New Zealand passerine, remain poorly known. It has been included into or associated with several bird families (Calleatidae, Cracticidae, Pachycephalidae, Ptilonorhynchidae, Turdidae), often on tenuous grounds. We reassessed Turnagra phylogenetic relationships using nuclear and mitochondrial sequences and a set of morphological and behavioural traits. Molecular and phenotypic characters strongly suggest a novel hypothesis, congruently placing Turnagra in Oriolidae, a highly dispersive corvoid family distributed from the Austro-Papuan landmass to Eurasia and Africa, but missing from the Pacific islands. We show also that the published molecular support to link Turnagra with Ptilonorhynchidae was biased by the use of incorrect genetic data and weak analyses.

  • 2075. Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The Monticola rock-thrushes: phylogeny and biogeography revisited.2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 901-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships within the Monticola rock-thrushes, an open-habitat genus inhabiting a large part of the Old World. Our results support one Oriental clade and one clade including African, Malagasy and Eurasian taxa. The biogeographic reconstruction obtained with the dispersal-vicariance analysis suggested Southern Africa plus Palearctic as the Monticola ancestral area. Our phylogenetic hypothesis suggests also some taxonomic changes. The polytypic Monticola solitarius includes two reciprocally monophyletic clades that should be recognized as full species, M. solitarius s.s. and M. philippensis. With the exclusion of the south-western population, M. imerinus, all other Malagasy rock-thrush populations should be merged in the monotypic, albeit polymorphic, M. sharpei. The genus Thamnolaea is shown to be non-monophyletic, with T. semirufa being part of the Monticola radiation, while T. cinnamomeiventris is related to other chat species inhabiting open-habitats. We demonstrate that a previous phylogenetic hypothesis for the rock-thrushes was flawed by the inclusion of contaminated sequences obtained from study-skins and we suggest some working guidelines to improve the reliability of the sequences obtained from old or degraded DNA.

  • 2076.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The phylogenetic position of the Black-collared Bulbul Neolestes torquatus2010In: Ibis, ISSN 0019-1019, E-ISSN 1474-919X, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 386-392Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2077.
    Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Pasquet, Eric
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    Phylogenetic relationships among Palearctic-Oriental starlings and mynas (genera Sturnus and Acridotheres: Sturnidae)2008In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 469-481Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2078. Zuccon, Dario
    et al.
    Prŷs-Jones, Robert
    Rasmussen, Pamela C
    Ericson, Per G P
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Research Division.
    The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae).2012In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 581-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic relationships among the true finches (Fringillidae) have been confounded by the recurrence of similar plumage patterns and use of similar feeding niches. Using a dense taxon sampling and a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial sequences we reconstructed a well resolved and strongly supported phylogenetic hypothesis for this family. We identified three well supported, subfamily level clades: the Holoarctic genus Fringilla (subfamly Fringillinae), the Neotropical Euphonia and Chlorophonia (subfamily Euphoniinae), and the more widespread subfamily Carduelinae for the remaining taxa. Although usually separated in a different family-group taxon (Drepanidinae), the Hawaiian honeycreepers are deeply nested within the Carduelinae and sister to a group of Asian Carpodacus. Other new relationships recovered by this analysis include the placement of the extinct Chaunoproctus ferreorostris as sister to some Asian Carpodacus, a clade combining greenfinches (Carduelis chloris and allies), Rhodospiza and Rhynchostruthus, and a well-supported clade with the aberrant Callacanthis and Pyrrhoplectes together with Carpodacus rubescens. Although part of the large Carduelis-Serinus complex, the poorly known Serinus estherae forms a distinct lineage without close relatives. The traditionally delimited genera Carduelis, Serinus, Carpodacus, Pinicola and Euphonia are polyphyletic or paraphyletic. Based on our results we propose a revised generic classification of finches and describe a new monotypic genus for Carpodacus rubescens.

  • 2079.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Akvaristikens och Nordiska Ciklidsällskapets bakgrund – varför, när och hur.2015In: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 32-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2080.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Carl Edelstam och vattenödlornas magar2017In: Snoken, ISSN 0347-7630, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2081.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Carl Edelstam [Till minne]2016In: Dagens Nyheter (Kultur), ISSN 1101-2447, no 20 April, p. 14-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2082.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    En Lissotriton vulgaris!2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 31 juli, p. Kultur 24-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2083.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Släktet Thorichthys2015In: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 42-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2084.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Utlåtande om det biologiska museet på Karolinska skolan i Örebro2014In: Örebro-Karolinaren, no 74, p. 7-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2085.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Yngve ÖSt, 1929-20162016In: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 40-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2086.
    Åhlander, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vem var egentligen först med azurmesen2014In: Roadrunner, ISSN 1402-2451, no 2, p. 45-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2087. Östman, Örjan
    et al.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Aho, Teija
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Relative contributions of evolutionary and ecological dynamics to body size and life-history changes of herring (Clupea harengus) in the Bothnian Sea2014In: Evolutionary Ecology Research, ISSN 1522-0613, E-ISSN 1937-3791, no 16, p. 417-433Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2088. ČERŇANSKÝ, Andrej
    et al.
    SZYNDLAR, Zbigniew
    Mörs, Thomas
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Fossil squamate faunas from the Neogene of Hambach (northwestern Germany). Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments2016In: Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments, ISSN 1867-1594, E-ISSN 1867-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2089.
    Škoda, Radek
    et al.
    Masaryk University.
    Plasil, Jakub
    Institute of Physics ASCR.
    Čopjaková, Renata
    Masaryk University.
    Novak, Milan
    Masaryk University.
    Jonsson, Erik
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Vasinova Galiova, Michaela
    Masaryk University.
    Holtstam, Dan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Gadolinite-(Nd), a new member of the gadolinite supergroup from Fe-REE deposits of Bastnäs-type.2018In: Mineralogical magazine, ISSN 0026-461X, E-ISSN 1471-8022, Vol. 82(S1), p. S133-S145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2090.
    Žliobaitė, Indrė
    et al.
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Rinne, Janne
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Tóth, Anikó
    Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems Program, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute, Washington,DC 20013.
    Mechenich, Michael
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Liping, Liu
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Behrensmeyer, Anna
    Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems Program, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute, Washington,DC 20013.
    Fortelius, Mikael
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Herbivore teeth predict climatic limits in Kenyan ecosystems2016In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, p. 12751-12756Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major focus in evolutionary biology is to understand how the evolution of organisms relates to changes in their physical environment. In the terrestrial realm, the interrelationships among climate,vegetation, and herbivores lie at the heart of this question. Here we introduce and test a scoring scheme for functional traits present on theworn surfaces of large mammalian herbivore teeth to capture their relationship to environmental conditions. We modeled local precipitation, temperature, primary productivity, and vegetation index as functions of dental traits of large mammal species in 13 national parks in Kenya over the past 60 y. We found that these dental traits can accurately estimate local climate and environment, even at small spatial scales within areas of relatively uniform climate (within two ecoregions), and that they predict limiting conditions better than average conditions. These findings demonstrate that the evolution of key functional properties of organisms may be more reflective of demands during recurring adverse episodes than under average conditions or during isolated severe events.

39404142 2051 - 2090 of 2090
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