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  • 251.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    G.J. Billberg's (1833) 'On the Ichthyology, and description of some new fish species of the pipefish genus Syngnathus'2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3066, no 2, p. 101-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gustaf Johan Billberg’s review of ichthyology, published in Swedish in 1833 in the Linnéska samfundets handlingar, mentions92 fish taxa at genus and species level, 41 of which represent new taxa, unnecessary replacement names, or unjustifiedemendations. Billberg presents his own classification of fishes, in which five new family names are introduced:Ballistidae, Diodontidae, Ooididae, Chironectidae, and Macrorhyncidae. Diodontidae has priority over Diodontidae Bonaparte, 1835. Macrorhyncidae was published earlier than Gempylidae Gill, 1862, but the latter has priority by prevailingusage.Billberg mentions 61 genera of fishes, 41 of them listed only by name. Six generic names proposed by Billberg are available as unjustified emendations: Myxinus, Petromyzus, Scylia, Mustellus, Zyganna, and Ballistes. Brachionus is anunnecessary replacement name. Aphrus, Capriscus, Exormizus, Enneophthalmus, and Oedaus are nomina nuda. Eight new genera of fishes are proposed: Anodon, Posthias, Orbis, Sphaeroides, and Ooides are junior synonyms; Cotilla is anomen oblitum in relation to Sufflamen Jordan, 1916; Tropigaster a nomen oblitum in relation to Aracana Gray, 1835;and Tetragonizus a nomen oblitum in relation to Lactoria Jordan & Fowler, 1902.Billberg lists 31 species of fishes. Three represent new combinations; two are nomina nuda. The following 14 newspecies are described based on literature: Raja forskohlii, Cephaloptera dumerillii, Myliobatis lacepedei, Scylia russelii,Anodon macropterus, Cotilla frenata, Monacanthus blochii, M. sebae, M. cuvieri, M. marcgravii, Tetraodon striatus,Orbis psittacinus, Orbis punctulatus, and Orbis guttatus. All of those are invalid, except Scylia russelii, which is a species inquirenda. The following nine species group names are unnecessary replacement names and consequentlyinvalid: Raja arabica, Myliobatis rissoi, Scylia isabellina, Anodon cirrhosus, Anodon cornutus, Zyganna voracissima,Centrina broussonetii, Acipenser vulgaris, and Acipenser ichthyocolla.Three species of pipefishes of the family Syngnathidae are described and figured by Billberg from drawings ofspecimens observed on the Swedish West Coast. Syngnathus virens and S. pustulatus are junior synonyms of S. typhle Linnaeus, 1758. Syngnathus palmstruchii is a junior synonym of Entelurus aequoreus (Linnaeus, 1758).

  • 252.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Nemachilichthys ruppelli (Teleostei: Nemacheilidae) and the proper correction of the German umlaut2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4111, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fish species names based on the family name of Eduard Rüppell are reviewed, and it is concluded that Nemachilichthys ruppelli correct name for Cobitis rupellii Sykes, 1839

  • 253.
    Kullander, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The need for fish taxonomy in biodiversity and fishery assessment and management2014In: Fish identification tools for biodiversity and fisheries assessments: Review and guidance for decision-makers / [ed] Johanne Fischer, Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), 2014, p. 52-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Danio htamanthinus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), a new species of miniature cyprinid fish from the Chindwin River in Myanmar2016In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4178, no 4, p. 535-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Danio htamanthinus, new species, is described from small streams in the vicinity of Htamanthi on the middle Chindwin River. It is most similar to D. choprae and D. flagrans from the Ayeyarwaddy River drainage, sharing the same elaborate colour pattern with dark vertical bars and a red interstripe along the posterior side, but is distinguished by the absence of a P+1 stripe and presence of a P stripe represented only by small spots. The uncorrected p-distance in the mitochondrial COI gene separates D. htamanthinus from D. choprae by 4.3% and from D. flagrans by 7.5%. The largest specimen is only 22.9 mm in standard length (male holotype), but the holotype and one other male, 19.5 mm SL, feature sex-specific pectoral-fin tubercles, and a female as small as 16.6 mm SL has ripening ova.In a phylogenetic analysis based on COI sequences, D. htamanthinus is sister taxon of D. flagrans+D. choprae, and those three species are sister group of D. margaritatus+D.erythromicron.

  • 255.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. FishBase.
    The real Devario browni from the Irrawaddy River basin, and the new Devario ahlanderi from the Salween River basin in Myanmar (Teleostei: Cyprinidae: Danioninae)2022In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, ISSN 1175-5326, Vol. 5100, no 1, p. 54-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specimens of Devario from a tributary to the Salween River in Myanmar initially identified as Devario browni but witha different colour pattern, were subjected to a comparative morphological analysis with syntypes and other specimens of D. browni from near its putative type locality. The Salween sample was recognised as representing a distinct species, here named Devario ahlanderi. No significant morphometric differences were found between D. ahlanderi and D. browni.The type series of Devario ahlanderi differed from D. browni and most other species of Devario in the presence of 14 vs 12 circumpeduncular scale rows. Devario ahlanderi, D. browni, and D. fangae shared subadult colour pattern. Adult D. ahlanderi differed from adult D. browni in the trunk colour pattern, consisting of rows of dark blotches or short vertical bars. In D. browni, the flank colour pattern consisted of horizontal dark stripes, the middle of which (the P stripe) frequently diverged anteriorly, enclosing a small light blotch. Specimens previously reported as D. browni from the upper Salween River basin in Yunnan differed slightly in colour pattern, and may represent a distinct species. Devario ahlanderi shared spotted colour pattern with that of one ontogenetic state in D. kysonensis, except that a row of spots marking the P-1 stripe in D. kysonensis was absent in D. ahlanderi. The minimum genetic distance between D. ahlanderi and congeneric species varied from 2.1 to 5% in the mt-coI gene.

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  • 256.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Description of Neolamprologus timidus, new species, and review of N. furcifer from Lake Tanganyika (Teleostei: Cichlidae)2013In: Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, ISSN 0936-9902, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 301-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neolamprologus timidus, new species, is described from Ulwile Island and adjacent localities on the Tanzanian coast of Lake Tanganyika. The species was observed or collected along about 100 km of coastline from KolwePoint, Cape Mpimbwe, south to Kisi Island. It is distinguished from the most similar species, N. furcifer, by presenceof scales on most of the cheek, long pectoral fin and pelvic fin with the second ray longer than the first. Neolamprologus timidus is sympatric with N. furcifer at Kolwe Point and south to Kampempa Point, and at Lupitaand Ulwile Islands south to Kisi Island, but N. furcifer is otherwise absent from the range of N. timidus. Two morphologically distinct forms are recognized in N. furcifer. Samples of N. furcifer from Ulwile Island and slightly more southern localities possess a caudal fin with rounded lobes and long middle rays, appearing onlyslightly emarginate. Samples of N. furcifer from Udachi and nearby localities possess pointed caudal-fin lobeswith greatly elongated streamers, similar to N. timidus and to N. furcifer from other parts of Lake Tanganyika, including the type specimens from the southern part of the lake. The variation in caudal-fin shape may be an expression of character displacement as it occurs in the area of sympatry between N. timidus and N. furcifer. MitochondrialDNA sequences are nearly identical in samples of N. furcifer with pointed or rounded caudal fin. A molecular phylogenetic analysis of a large set of lamprologin cichlids using two mitochondrial genes corroborates earlier analyses and places N. furcifer and N. timidus in different clades with different species of Neolamprologus, Julidochromis, Chalinochromis, and Telmatochromis despite sharing a unique combination of fin and bodyshape, and colour pattern. A 4648 base-pair multiloci analysis of a smaller number of species using fragments ofthree mitochondrial and two nuclear genes resolves N. furcifer and N. timidus in sister clades, but the N. timidus clade also includes Telmatochromis brachygnathus, and N. furcifer is sister species of Chalinochromis brichardi.

  • 257.
    Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Rahman, MD. Mizanur
    University of Dhaka.
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Mollah, Abdur Rob
    University of Dhaka.
    Why is Pseudophromenus cupanus (Teleostei: Osphronemidae) reported from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Pakistan?2015In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3990, no 4, p. 575-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The native distribution of the small labyrinth fish species Pseudosphromenus cupanus includes southern India and Sri Lanka. According to literature it has a range including also Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, and Indonesia (Sumatra) but there are no voucher specimens or reliable observations from those areas. The distribution record of P. cupanus was inflated partly by including P. dayi as a synonym. Pseudosphronemus dayi is native to the Western Ghats in India, but the origin of the aquarium importation in 1907 was reported as both Cochin (=Kochi) and Malacca (=Malaysia), the latter locality obviously in error. The basis for the Sumatra record is an obviously mislabeled sample of P. dayi from Pulau Weh close to Sumatra. The basis for reporting the species from Pakistan, Myanmar or Bangladesh could not be located. Misidentified museum specimens from Myanmar and Pakistan identified as P. cupanus were never published on. Pseudosphromenus cupanus has been considered recently to be extinct in Bangladesh, but in fact it never occurred there.

  • 258. Kullander, Sven
    et al.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    NRM Brief history and description of the ichthyological collection of the Swedish Museum of Natural History, with emphasis on the Neotropical component2019In: Boletim Sociedade Brasileira de Ictiologia, ISSN 1808-1436, Vol. 129, p. 103-105Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 259. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A review of the genus Chasmaporthetes Hay, 1921 (Carnivora, Hyaenidae)1988In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 8, p. 46-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 260. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Relationships between North and South American Smilodon1990In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 10, p. 158-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 261. Kurtén, B.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    The relationships of Lynx shansius Teilhard1984In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, Vol. 21, p. 129-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 262. Kuzmina, Tetiana
    et al.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Equine Strongylidae and other parasitic nematodes described by Arthur Looss during 1895–1911 in the collections of the Swedish Museum of Natural History2023In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 5227, no 2, p. 151-193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 263.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A redescription of Chaetonotus (Primochaetus) veronicae Kånneby, 2013 (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae)2015In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4027, no 3, p. 442-446Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 264.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gastrotricha of Sweden - Biodiversity and Phylogeny2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha are small aquatic invertebrates with approximately 770 known species. The group has a cosmopolitan distribution and is currently classified into two orders, Chaetonotida and Macrodasyida. The gastrotrich fauna of Sweden is poorly known: a couple of years ago only 29 species had been reported. In Paper I, III, and IV, 5 freshwater species new to science are described. In total 56 species have been recorded for the first time in Sweden during the course of this thesis. Common species with a cosmopolitan distribution, e. g. Chaetonotus hystrix and Lepidodermella squamata, as well as rarer species, e. g. Haltidytes crassus, Ichthydium diacanthum and Stylochaeta scirtetica, are reported. In Paper II molecular data is used to infer phylogenetic relationships within the morphologically very diverse marine family Thaumastodermatidae (Macrodasyida). Results give high support for monophyly of Thaumastodermatidae and also the subfamilies Diplodasyinae and Thaumastodermatinae. In Paper III the hypothesis of cryptic speciation is tested in widely distributed freshwater gastrotrichs. Heterolepidoderma ocellatum f. sphagnophilum is raised to species under the name H. acidophilum n. sp. The results indicate that L. squamata may be a complex of at least two species. In Paper III and V the phylogeny of Chaetonotidae (Chaetonotida), the largest family within Gastrotricha, is inferred. The group suffers from a troubled taxonomy and is hypothesized to be nonmonophyletic. Results show that members of Dasydytidae are nested within the group. Since only 3 of 17 sampled genera are monophyletic, it is hypothesized that the cuticular structures used in current classification do not reflect phylogenetic relationships. The phylogenetic hypothesis generated in Paper V indicates a marine origin of the predominantly limnic Chaetonotidae with a subsequent secondary invasion to marine environments of some taxa.

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    Kånneby 2011
  • 265.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New species and new records of freshwater Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha) from Sweden2011In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3115, p. 29-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha is a small phylum of acoelomatic aquatic invertebrates common in both marine and freshwater environments. The freshwater gastrotrich fauna of Sweden is poorly known and so far only 20 species have been reported. In this study two species, Heterolepidoderma joermungandri n. sp. and H. trapezoidum n. sp., are described as new to science. Moreover, 9 species are presented as new to the Swedish fauna. Additional taxonomic information is also given for 4 species previously reported from the country. In total 7 genera of two families, Chaetonotidae and Dasydytidae, are presented and the number of reported freshwater gastrotrichs from the country is increased to 31.

  • 266.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    New species and records of freshwater Chaetonotus (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae) from Sweden2013In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3701, no 5, p. 551-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chaetonotus is the most speciose genus of the family Chaetonotidae within Gastrotricha, a small phylum of aquatic acoe-lomate invertebrates. The freshwater gastrotrich fauna of Sweden has been studied during the last five years and so far 44 species have been reported in the literature from the country. This study describes the new species, Chaetonotus (Pri-mochaetus) veronicae n. sp., and reports 9 species new to the Swedish fauna raising the known number of freshwater spe-cies from the country to 54. Some records stand out from a biogeographic point of view: Chaetonotus (Primochaetus) soberanus is reported for the first time from Europe and Chaetonotus (Chaetonotus) arethusae, Chaetonotus (Chaetonotus) naiadis and Chaetonotus (Hystricochaetonotus) euhystrix are reported for the first time outside the countries from which they were originally described.

  • 267.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylum Gastrotricha2016In: Keys to Nearctic Fauna: Thorp and Covich's Freshwater Invertebrates / [ed] Thorp, J., Rogers, D.C., Academic Press, 2016, 4, p. 115-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 268.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Atherton, Sarah
    Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA.
    Hochberg, Rick
    Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA.
    Two new species of Musellifer (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotida) from Florida and Tobago and the systematic placement of the genus within Paucitubulatina2014In: Marine Biology Research, ISSN 1745-1000, E-ISSN 1745-1019, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 983-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new species of marine Gastrotricha, Musellifer reichardti sp. nov. and Musellifer tridentatus sp. nov. (Chaetonotida: Paucitubulatina: Muselliferidae), are described from the Atlantic coast of Florida (USA) and the west coast of Tobago (Trinidad and Tobago), respectively. Both new species are peculiar in that they lack a muzzle bearing the mouth, which is a diagnostic character of the genus. They correspond well to the diagnosis of Musellifer in other morphological features, and genetic data from the 18S rDNA gene of M. reichardti sp. nov. further support the inclusion of the new species in the genus Musellifer. Musellifer reichardti sp. nov. is distinguished by the following combination of characters: blunt head with reduced muzzle; dorsal patches of naked cuticle bearing sensory cilia on either side of the head; ventral locomotory cilia restricted to the pharyngeal region; spined scales; caudal furca with naked adhesive tubes. The new species is a simultaneous hermaphrodite with posterior paired ovaries, paired testes located at mid-body length, and a posterior frontal organ. M. tridentatus sp. nov. is the first species within the genus exhibiting two types of dorsal/lateral scales: anteriormost dorsal and lateral trident-shaped scales and smooth strongly overlapping dorsal scales. The systematic placement of Musellifer within the Paucitubulatina is discussed and emended diagnoses are given for Muselliferidae and Musellifer.

  • 269. Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Bernvi, David C
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University.
    Distribution, delimitation and description of species of Archaphanostoma (Acoela)2014In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 44, no 2, article id 218-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hochberg, Rick
    Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA.
    Phylum Gastrotricha2015In: Ecology and General Biology: Thorp and Covich's Freshwater Invertebrates / [ed] Thorp, J. and Rogers, D. C., Academic Press, 2015, 4, p. 211-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 271.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Four new species of Acoela from Chile2013In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 3736, no 5, p. 471-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acoels are with few exceptions marine worms and a common component of the interstitial meiofauna. In this study we present new species to science belonging to Isodiametridae and Solenofilomorphidae. The new species, Isodiametra finkei n. sp., Postaphanostoma nilssoni n. sp., Pseudaphanostoma hyalinorhabdoida n. sp. and Solenofilomorpha pellucida n. sp. were all collected in Chile during March 2012. Nucleotide sequences for the ribosomal genes 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA as well as COI mtDNA have been determined for the new species and used in a maximum likelihood analysis to further support their classification.

  • 272.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kirk, James, J.
    A new species of Redudasys (Gastrotricha: Macrodasyida: Redudasyidae)from the United States2017In: Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, ISSN 0006-324X, E-ISSN 1943-6327, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 128-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Redudasys (Macrodasyida: Redudasyidae) isdescribed from Texas and Oregon, U.S.A. A single Texas specimen wasreported (but not formally described and named) in 2014 from an artesianoutflow in Spring Lake, San Marcos, Texas. The Texas specimen provided thefirst record of Redudasys from outside Brazil. Fifteen specimens were foundand studied in 2015 and 2016 from sand pockets among boulders in the LittleNestucca River, near Pacific City, Oregon. Redudasys neotemperatus n. sp. ismorphologically and genetically distinguishable from Redudasys forneriseKisielewski, 1987a, the only formally described species in the genus up untilnow, and morphologically distinguishable from ‘‘Redudasys sp.’’, an unnamedform reported by Garraffoni et al. in 2010 without genetic information. TheTexas and Oregon specimens agree well morphologically and genetically.

  • 273.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    A new species of Aspidiophorus (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotidae) from the Swedish west coast2017In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4290, no 2, p. 390-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A phylogenetic approach to species delimitation in freshwater Gastrotricha from Sweden2012In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 683, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha is a cosmopolitan group of aquatic invertebrates. To date, approximately 765 species have been described. This study is the first to deal with species delimitation and cryptic species of freshwater Gastrotricha. Three commonly encountered species, Heterolepidoderma ocellatum, Lepidochaetus zelinkai, and Lepidodermella squamata, are investigated for cryptic speciation. Most of the material is based on Swedish specimens but closely related species from other parts of the world are also included. Taxonomic revisions are supported by phylogenies based on 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and COI mtDNA of freshwater Chaetonotidae from several genera and inferred from Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. Heterolepidoderma ocellatum f. sphagnophilum is raised to species level, under the name H. acidophilum n. sp. Moreover, genetic data based on COI indicate large variation between two morphologically very similar groups of Lepidodermella squamata. The extent of cryptic speciation in L. zelinkai appears low. Based on the phylogenetic hypothesis presented in this article, the new species, Lepidodermella intermedia n. sp., from northern Sweden is also described. The phylogenetic hypothesis generated shows that Chaetonotidae is a nonmonophyletic group.

  • 275.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    One new species and records of Ichthydium Ehrenberg, 1830 (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotida) from Sweden with a key to the genus2009In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 2278, p. 26-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The freshwater gastrotrich fauna of Sweden is poorly known. Only seven species of freshwater gastrotrichs have been reported so far. This paper is the first in a series of contributions about the Swedish freshwater gastrotrich fauna. Here we describe one new species, Ichthydium skandicum n. sp., from Jämtland, northern Sweden. The new species falls within the boundary of the subgenus Forficulichthys and is morphologically closest to Ichthydium tanytrichum from which it can be differentiated based on the presence of four pairs of dorsal, keeled scales in the posterior trunk region. Moreover, we provide morphometric data for three additional Ichthydium species: I. diacanthum, I. squamigerum and I. tanytrichum, Italian species all of which are reported for the first time outside Italy. Considering the accompanying fauna, a total of thirteen freshwater Gastrotricha are reported for the first time from Sweden. Finally we present a dichotomous key for Ichthydium along with distributional data of the species considered.

  • 276.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Todaro, M. Antonio
    Department of Biology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Phylogeny of Chaetonotidae and other Paucitubulatina (Gastrotricha: Chaetonotida) and the colonization of aquatic ecosystems2013In: Zoologica Scripta, ISSN 0300-3256, E-ISSN 1463-6409, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 88-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chaetonotidae is the largest family within Gastrotricha with almost 400 nominal species represented in both freshwater and marine habitats. The group is probably non-monophyletic and suffers from a troubled taxonomy. Current classification is to a great extent based on shape and distribution of cuticular structures, characters that are highly variable. We present the most densely sampled molecular study so far where 17 of the 31 genera belonging to Chaetonotida are represented. Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches based on 18S rDNA, 28S rDNA and COI mtDNA are used to reconstruct relationships within Chaetonotidae. The use of cuticular structures for supra-specific classification within the group is evaluated and the question of dispersal between marine and freshwater habitats is addressed. Moreover, the subgeneric classification of Chaetonotus is tested in a phylogenetic context. Our results show high support for a clade containing Dasydytidae nested within Chaetonotidae. Within this clade, only three genera are monophyletic following current classification. Genera containing both marine and freshwater species never form monophyletic clades and group with other species according to habitat. Marine members of Aspidiophorus appear to be the sister group of all other Chaetonotidae and Dasydytidae, indicating a marine origin of the clade. Halichaetonotus and marine Heterolepidoderma form a monophyletic group in a sister group relationship to freshwater species, pointing towards a secondary invasion of marine environments of these taxa. Our study highlights the problems of current classification based on cuticular structures, characters that show homoplasy for deeper relationships.

  • 277.
    Kånneby, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wicksten, Mary K.
    First record of the enigmatic genus Redudasys Kisielewski, 1987 (Gastrotricha: Macrodasyida) from the Northern hemisphere2014In: Zoosystema, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 723-733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastrotricha Metschnikoff, 1865 is a small phylum of acoelomatic animals common in both marine and freshwater environments. To date, close to 800 species are known from all over the world. The order Macrodasyida Remane, 1925 [Rao & Clausen, 1970] is almost exclusively marine except for the rare genera Marinellina Ruttner-Kolisko, 1955 and Redudasys Kisielewski, 1987. In this study, we present morphological and molecular data for a potentially new species of Redudasys from the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, USA. It is the first record of the genus from the Northern hemisphere. It has only previously been reported from Brazil. The Texan specimen, designated as Redudasys sp., has a single pair of anterior adhesive tubes and is considerably shorter than the specimens reported from Brazil. Molecular data from the 18S rRNA and COI mtDNA genes support a close relationship of Redudasys sp. to Redudasys fornerise Kisielewski, 1987. Barcodes are provided for both Redudasys sp. and R. fornerise. The limited material obtained does not justify the description of a new species, but the record is certainly important from a biogeographical standpoint. The colonization and invasion of marine species into freshwater habitats, in particular those of the Edwards Aquifer, is discussed. Although certain marine gastrotrichs appear to have an astonishing ability to adapt to changes in salinity Redudasys is likely to be a marine relic.

  • 278.
    Lagerholm, Vendela K.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Noren, Karin
    Ehrich, Dorothee
    Ims, Rolf A.
    Killengreen, Siw T.
    Abramson, Natalia I.
    Niemimaa, Jukka
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Henttonen, Heikki
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Run to the hills: gene flow among mountain areas leads to low genetic differentiation in the Norwegian lemming2017In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 279.
    Lagerholm, Vendela K.
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Vaniscotte, Amelie
    Potapova, Olga R.
    Tomek, Teresa
    Bochenski, Zbigniew M.
    Shepherd, Paul
    Barton, Nick
    Van Dyck, Marie-Claire
    Miller, Rebecca
    Hoglund, Jacob
    Yoccoz, Nigel G.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Stewart, John R.
    Range shifts or extinction?: Ancient DNA and distribution modelling reveal past and future responses to climate warming in cold-adapted birds2017In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1425-1435Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 280.
    Lagerholm, Vendela
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Sandoval-Castellanos, E.
    Ehrich, D.
    Abramson, N.
    Nadachowski, A.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Germonpré, M.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stewart, J.
    Dalén, L.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    On the Origin of the Norwegian Lemming2014In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 2060-2071Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 281. Le Pepke, Michael
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Rahbek, Carsten
    Jonsson, Knud Andreas
    Reconciling supertramps, great speciators and relict species with the taxon cycle stages of a large island radiation (Aves: Campephagidae)2019In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1214-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The taxon cycle concept provides a geographically explicit and testable set of hypotheses for exploring the evolutionary processes underlying the distribution of species in space and time. Here, we test taxon cycle predictions within a large avian island radiation, the core Campephagidae and explicitly integrate the concepts of ‘supertramps’, ‘great speciators’ and relictualization. Location The Indo-Pacific, Australia, Asia and Africa. Taxon Corvoid passerine birds. Methods We constructed a new time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the core Campephagidae (cuckooshrikes, cicadabirds and trillers) using Bayesian phylogenetic methods. Ancestral range estimation methods and diversification rate analyses were used to explore the dispersal and diversification history of the group. We used an extensive dataset on wing morphology and range distributions to test for correlations between evolutionary age of species and dispersal capacity, diversification and distribution, while accounting for phylogenetic non-independence. Results The core Campephagidae represents an ecologically homogeneous radiation distributed across the Indo-Pacific, Australia, Southeast Asia and Africa. Its members represent a continuum of dispersal abilities; some species are widespread and undifferentiated (’supertramps’) or show strong differentiation of local populations (’great speciators’), and a few are endemic to single islands (relicts). We show that older species relative to younger species inhabit fewer and larger islands at higher elevations. The level of intraspecific variation measured as the number of subspecies also decreases with species age, and is highest in ‘great speciators’ with intermediate levels of dispersal abilities (as per hand-wing index). Main conclusions Based on trait correlations with species age, we infer phases of range expansion and contraction over millions of years (taxon cycles), within a single monophyletic group of birds. These observations demonstrate reconciliation of the concepts of ‘supertramps’, ‘great speciators’ and relictual palaeoendemics within the temporal stages of the taxon cycle.

  • 282. Leakey, M. G.
    et al.
    Feibel, C. S.
    Bernor, R. L.
    Harris, J. M.
    Cerling, T. E.
    Stewart, K. M.
    Storrs, G. W.
    Walker, A.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Winkler, A. J.
    Lothagam: a record of faunal change in the late Miocene of East Africa1996In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 16, p. 556-570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 283. Leakey, Meave G.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Early Pleistocene Mammals of Africa: Background to dispersal2011In: Out of Africa 1: Who, When and Where? / [ed] Fleagle, J. G., Shea, J. J., Grine, F. & Leakey, R., New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2011, p. 3-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial dispersal of humans out of Africa was a significant event in human evolution raising many questions. Why did this happen at this particular time? Was it part of a major migration of mammals out of Africa and did any species move into Africa at the same time? Were climate and habitat changes taking place that might have been contributing factors? With the advent of culture at 2.6 Ma, hominins moved from the primate to the carnivore feeding niche, thus avoiding constraints that had previously determined their distribution. Here we look at fossil carnivores and cercopithecids for factors that provide a background to this significant event in our evolutionary history and we also look at herbivore diversity as a potential source of prey for meat-eating hominins.

  • 284. Lee, Taekjun
    et al.
    Stöhr, Sabine
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Bae, Yeon Jae
    Shin, Sook
    A New Fissiparous Brittle Star, Ophiacantha scissionis sp. nov. (Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea, Ophiacanthida), from Jeju Island, Korea2019In: Zoological Studies, ISSN 1021-5506, E-ISSN 1810-522X, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 285.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wayland, Matthew
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Data on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from Baltic grey (Halichoerus grypus) and ringed seals (Pusa hispida)2020In: Dryad, Vol. v3, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Leidenberger, Sonja
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Boström, Sven
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Wayland, Matthew
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Morphological observations on three Baltic species of Corynosoma Lühe, 1905 (Acanthocephala, Polymorphidae)2019In: European journal of taxonomy, E-ISSN 2118-9773, Vol. 514, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 287. Lewis, Margaret E.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Carnivoran dispersal out of Africa during the Early Pleistocene: relevance for hominins?2010In: Out of Africa 1: Who, When and Where? / [ed] Fleagle, J. G., Shea, J. J., Grine, F. & Leakey, R, New York: Springer, 2010, p. 13-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Carnivorans and hominins share a long history of interactions. This paper examines some of the evidence for carnivoran migration out of Africa at the same time as the earliest hominin dispersals. Of the two relevant taxa, Crocuta  and Megantereon , Megantereon  is the focus of this paper due to increased interest in this taxon in recent years and to the nature of the earliest records of dispersal of these two taxa, raising several questions related to Megantereon  and its possible influence on hominins. To answer these questions, a brief summary of the literature on Megantereon  in Eurasia and Africa is provided. While researchers do not agree on the number of species of Megantereon  or the evolutionary relationships among those species, most would agree that Megantereon  is a hypercarnivorous predator capable of grappling with relatively large prey for its body size. Despite the fact that carcasses generated by Megantereon  were probably of value to hominins, the hypotheses that these carcasses were a major source of food or that they were a major force enabling hominins to migrate out of Africa are rejected. As indicated in the literature on extant carnivorans, kleptoparasitism (= food theft) by dominant members of a carnivore guild exacts a heavy price on lower ranking carnivores. In addition, there is nothing in the African fossil record to suggest a special relationship between Megantereon  and hominins that did not exist between hominins and other large-bodied carnivorans. The hypothesis that a species of Megantereon  migrated out of Africa at roughly the same time as early hominins is also considered. While this hypothesis cannot be rejected, alternative hypotheses to explain similarities between later African and Eurasian forms of Megantereon  are proposed (e.g., shared characters are due to convergence or are symplesiomorphies). In the end, the small number of diverse African species (including hominins) who disperse into Eurasia at the Plio- Pleistocene transition may have been part of a sweepstakes dispersal where the factors permitting (or driving) dispersal may have differed from species to species.

  • 288. Lewis, Margaret E.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Patterns of change in in the Plio-Pleistocene carnivorans of eastern Africa: Implications for hominin evolution2007In: Hominin environments in the East African Pliocene: An assessment of the faunal evidence / [ed] Bobe, R., Alemseged, Z. & Behrensmeyer, A. K., New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2007, p. 77-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses changes in origination and extinction rates and species richness of eastern African carnivorans through time to discuss issues related to the evolution of hominin behavior. To address the question of which taxa were most likely to have had competitive interactions with hominins, modern carnivorans were sorted into size classes based on shifts in behavior, ecology, and body mass. Four size classes were created, among which the two largest (21.5–100 kg and >100 kg) include those taxa whose behavior is most relevant to the evolution of hominin dietary behavior. Fossil taxa were then assigned to these size classes. A summary of the temporal range and reconstructed behavior and ecology of fossil members of the two largest size classes is presented. We discuss the relevance of each taxon to reconstructing hominin behavior and suggest that hominins must have evolved not only successful anti-predator strategies, but also successful strategies to avoid kleptoparasitism before carcass-based resources could become an important part of the diet. Although hominins were unlikely to have been top predators upon first entrance into the carnivore guild, effective anti-predator/anti-kleptoparasitism strategies in combination with the eventual evolution of active hunting would have increased the rank of hominin species within the guild. While the appearance of stone tools at 2.6 Ma has no apparent effect upon carnivorans, the appearance of Homo ergaster  after 1.8 Ma may have been at least partly responsible for the decrease in the carnivoran origination rate and the increase in the extinction rate at this time. The behavior of H. ergaster , climate change, and concomitant changes in prey species richness may have caused carnivoran species richness to drop precipitously after 1.5 Ma. In this situation, even effective kleptoparasitism by H. ergaster  may have been enough to drive local populations of carnivorans that overlapped with hominins in dietary resources to extinction. Possibly as a result, the modern guild, which evolved within the last few hundred thousand years, is composed primarily of generalists. Although the impact of H. sapiens on the carnivoran guild cannot be assessed due to a lack of carnivoran fossils from this time period, one might not consider the modern carnivore guild to be complete until the appearance of our species approximately 200,000 years ago.

  • 289.
    Lewis, Margaret
    et al.
    Stockton University, USA.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A revision of the genus Crocuta (Mammalia, Hyaenidae)2022In: Palaeontographica. Abteilung A, Palaozoologie, Stratigraphie, ISSN 0375-0442, Vol. 322, no 1-4, p. 1-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Crocuta evolved in Africa no later than 4 Ma and dispersed from that continent between 2.5 and 2 Ma. At its peak in the late Pleistocene, Crocuta had a geographic distribution that encompassed most of the Old World, except for the northernmost parts of Siberia. Herein, we describe new material of Crocuta from Africa, review the fossil record of the genus in the rest of the world, and revise its species-level taxonomy on the basis of metric and morphological data. We conclude that the genus comprises at least seven extinct species in addition to the extant C. crocuta and that the fossil record includes a number of transitional specimens that cannot be classified to species. Extinct African species are C. venustula (synonyms: C. dietrichi, C. dbaa; early Pliocene – early Pleistocene), C. ultra (early – middle Pleistocene), and C. eturono (late Pliocene). Asian species are C. honanensis (early Pleistocene) and C. ultima (middle – late Pleistocene), possibly with an unnamed species in the early Pleistocene of India and Pakistan. European species are C. intermedia (middle Pleistocene) and C. spelaea (middle – late Pleistocene).

  • 290.
    Li, Zhong-Min
    et al.
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Roos, Anna Maria
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental Monitoring and Research. Department of Environmental Monitoring and Research, Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm SE-10405, Sweden.
    Serfass, Thomas L.
    Department of Biology and Natural Resources, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, Maryland 21532, United States.
    Lee, Conner
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Kannan, Kurunthachalam
    Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12237, United States.
    Concentrations of 45 Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances in North American River Otters (Lontra canadensis) from West Virginia, USA2024In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 2089-2101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) aretop predators in riverine ecosystems and are vulnerable to per- andpolyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure. Little is known aboutthe magnitude of exposure and tissue distribution of PFAS in riverotters. We measured 45 PFAS in various tissues of 42 river otterscollected from several watersheds in the state of West Virginia,USA. The median concentrations of ΣAll (sum concentration of45 PFAS) varied among tissues in the following decreasing order:liver (931 ng/g wet weight) > bile > pancreas > lung > kidney >blood > brain > muscle. Perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFSAs) were thepredominant compounds accounting for 58−75% of the totalconcentrations, followed by perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs;21−35%). 8:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate (8:2 FTS), 10:2 FTS, and 6:2 chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonate were frequentlyfound in the liver (50−90%) and bile (96−100%), whereas hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid (HFPO-DA) was rarely found.The hepatic concentrations of ΣAll in river otters collected downstream of a fluoropolymer production facility located along theOhio River were 2-fold higher than those in other watersheds. The median whole body burden of ΣAll was calculated to be 1580μg. PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations in whole blood of some river otters exceeded the human toxicityreference values, which warrant further studies.

  • 291. Lindenfors, P
    et al.
    Dalen, L
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Angerbjorn, A
    The monophyletic origin of delayed implantation in carnivores and its implications2003In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 1952-1956Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 292.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    A review of West Palaearctic Hoplocampa species, focussing on Sweden (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4615, no 1, p. 1-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen Hoplocampa species have been recorded in the West Palaearctic. We provide an illustrated key to these species, together with H. tadshikistanica, which is so far only known from Tadshikistan, but could occur in the West Palaearctic. The suitability of genetic sequencing for identification, particularly of larvae, is discussed. COI barcoding reliably distinguishes all European species which have been sampled (only H. phantoma lacks data), except for H. fulvicornis and H. minuta, which can be identified using nuclear sequences. Distributions in the Fennoscandian countries are outlined, with particular reference to Sweden. Hoplocampa chrysorrhoea is recorded for the first time in Scandinavia, from southern Sweden. Lectotypes are designated for twelve nominal taxa: Allantus ferrugineus Panzer, 1802, Hoplocampa chrysorrhoea var. nigrita Enslin, 1914, H. fabricii W. F. Kirby, 1882, H. oertzeni Konow, 1888, H. pectoralis Thomson, 1871, Hylotoma ferruginea Fabricius, 1804, Tenthredo alpina Zetterstedt, 1838, T. brevis Klug, 1816, T. chrysorrhoea Klug, 1816, T. crataegi Klug, 1816, T. plagiata Klug, 1816, and T. rutilicornis Klug, 1816. Hoplocampa minuta forma dudai Gregor, in Gregor & Bata, 1942 is a new synonym of H. fulvicornis (Panzer, 1801).

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  • 293.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The West Palaearctic Dineura species, focussing on Sweden (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4612, no 4, p. 501-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Dineura species are now considered to occur in the West Palaearctic, including northern Europe, but D. parcivalvis has not been found in Scandinavia. Dineura pullior Schmidt & Walter, 1995 is treated as a new junior subjective synonym of D. virididorsata (Retzius, 1783). An illustrated key to adults is presented. Lectotypes are designated for seven nominal taxa: Dineura stilata var. virilis Enslin, 1918, Dineura testaceipes var. nigriventris Enslin, 1915, Dineura virididorsata var. dorsalis Enslin, 1915, Nematus posticus Förster, 1854, Nematus xanthocerus Hartig, 1840, Nematus xanthopus Zaddach, 1876, and Tenthredo (Allantus) stilata Klug, 1816. Distributions in the Fennoscandian countries are outlined, with particular reference to Sweden.

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  • 294.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The West Palaearctic Pseudodineura and Endophytus species (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4614, no 3, p. 511-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Six valid species of Pseudodineura are now recognised as occurring in the West Palaearctic, and the only described species of the related genus Endophytus. Larvae of all species are leaf-miners in Ranunculaceae. An identification key to adults is provided, followed by species commentaries which include summarised data on taxonomy, larval host plants, and distribution, with particular reference to Sweden. Whereas identification of some specimens using morphological characters may not be possible, each species apparently has a distinct COI barcode sequence. Pseudodineura heringi(Enslin, 1921) is a new junior synonym of P. parvula (Klug, 1816). Pseudodineura mocsaryi Zombori, 1976 and P. scaligera Zombori, 1979 are new junior synonyms of P. clematidisrectae Hering, 1935. Lectotypes are designated for: Dolerus minutus Hartig, 1837, Pelmatopus clematidis Hering, 1932, P. enslini Hering, 1923, P. heringi Enslin, 1921, and P. mentiens var. konowi Enslin, 1921.

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  • 295. Liu, Shiping
    et al.
    Lorenzen, Eline D.
    Fumagalli, Matteo
    Li, Bo
    Harris, Kelley
    Xiong, Zijun
    Zhou, Long
    Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand
    Somel, Mehmet
    Babbitt, Courtney
    Wray, Greg
    Li, Jianwen
    He, Weiming
    Wang, Zhuo
    Fu, Wenjing
    Xiang, Xueyan
    Morgan, Claire C.
    Doherty, Aoife
    O’Connell, Mary J.
    McInerney, James O.
    Born, Erik W.
    Dalén, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Dietz, Rune
    Orlando, Ludovic
    Sonne, Christian
    Zhang, Guojie
    Nielsen, Rasmus
    Willerslev, Eske
    Wang, Jun
    Population Genomics Reveal Recent Speciation and Rapid Evolutionary Adaptation in Polar Bears2014In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 157, no 4, p. 785-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polar bears are uniquely adapted to life in the High Arctic and have undergone drastic physiological changes in response to Arctic climates and a hyper-lipid diet of primarily marine mammal prey. We analyzed 89 complete genomes of polar bear and brown bear using population genomic modeling and show that the species diverged only 479-343 thousand years BP. We find that genes on the polar bear lineage have been under stronger positive selection than in brown bears; nine of the top 16 genes under strong positive selection are associated with cardiomyopathy and vascular disease, implying important reorganization of the cardiovascular system. One of the genes showing the strongest evidence of selection, APOB, encodes the primary lipoprotein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL); functional mutations in APOB may explain how polar bears are able to cope with life-long elevated LDL levels that are associated with high risk of heart disease in humans.

  • 296.
    Lomas Vega, Marta
    Stockholm University, Department of Zoology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Department of Zoology.
    The effects of four decades of climate change on the breeding ecology of an avian sentinel species across a 1,500-km latitudinal gradient are stronger at high latitudes.2021In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 297. Long, J. A.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    A new Late Devonian bothriolepid (Placodermi, Antiarcha) from Victoria, with descriptions of other species from the state1986In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 10, p. 366-399Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 298.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Drotz, Marcus
    Berggren, Matz
    Lundin, Kennet
    von Proschwitz, Ted
    Invasion routes, current and historical distribution of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853) in Sweden2010In: Aquatic Invasions, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 387-396Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 299.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Svanberg, Ingvar
    European weather loach (Misgurnus fossilis) at Ulriksdal Palace, Stockholm, in the 1750s.2016Article in journal (Refereed)
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