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  • 501.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lewis, Margaret E.
    Koobi Fora Research Project Volume 7: The Carnivora2013Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 502.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lewis, Margaret E.
    New species of Crocuta from the Early Pliocene of Kenya, with an overview of early Pliocene hyenas of eastern Africa2008In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 28, p. 1162-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Crocuta (spotted hyenas), Crocuta eturono n. sp., from the Early Pliocene of the Turkana Basin, Kenya is described. The species has been recovered from LO6S, a site in the Kataboi Member of the Nachukui Formation, on the western side of Lake Turkana. The site is dated to >3.4 Ma. The new species differs from all previously identified species of Crocuta in its length proportions of the cheek teeth, having a very long m1 and short p3 and p4. The species is also tentatively identified from the Tulu Bor Member of the Koobi Fora Formation, east side of Lake Turkana. The new species provides information for a discussion of the structure of the hyena guild in eastern Africa 4–3 Ma. Three groups of taxa are identified with distinct distributions. It is hypothesized that specific ecomorphologies of each group account for these distinctions.

  • 503.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lewis, Margaret E.
    Plio-Pleistocene Carnivora of eastern Africa: species richness and turnover patterns2005In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 144, p. 121-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an up-to-date and detailed overview of the Plio-Pleistocene fossil record of Carnivora in eastern Africa. Major events in the carnivoran lineages present in the region are discussed and stratigraphic ranges of all species-level taxa are provided. The compiled data are used for quantitative analyses of species richness and turnover. Sampling is considered to be adequate for the interval 3.6–1.5 Mya, and poorer in the half-million-year time slices before and after this interval. Species richness peaks around 3.6–3.0 Mya and declines gradually from that time until the end of the time period analysed. Calculation of origination and extinction rates indicate that there are two peaks of origination: at 3.9–3.3 Mya (although the earlier half of this interval is biased through poor sampling) and at 2.1–1.8 Mya. The origination rate is zero in the interval 3.0–2.4 Mya. The extinction rate peaks at around 3.0 Mya after which it falls slightly, remaining nearly constant until 1.8 Mya, after which it increases considerably. The data support the hypothesis that the modern carnivoran guild of eastern Africa originated relatively recently, mostly within the last million years. There is no support in these data for a turnover pulse in Carnivora between 3 and 2 Mya.

  • 504.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lewis, Margaret E.
    Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.
    The taxonomic identity of the type specimen of Crocuta sivalensis (Falconer, 1867)2012In: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, ISSN 0272-4634, E-ISSN 1937-2809, Vol. 32, p. 1453-1456Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 505.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Lewis, Margaret E.
    Haile-Selassie, Yohannes
    A critical review of African species of Eucyon (Mammalia; Carnivora; Canidae), with a new species from the Pliocene of the Woranso-Mille Area, Afar Region, Ethiopia2015In: Papers in Palaeontology, ISSN 2056-2799, E-ISSN 2056-2802Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 506.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Long, J. A.
    Allometry in the placoderm Bothriolepis canadensis and its significance to antiarch evolution1986In: Lethaia: an international journal of palaeontology and stratigraphy, ISSN 0024-1164, E-ISSN 1502-3931, Vol. 19, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 507.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Manthi, F. K.
    Carnivora from the Kanapoi hominin site, northern Kenya2012In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 0899-5362, Vol. 64, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assemblage from Kanapoi represents the most diverse early Pliocene carnivore assemblage from sub- Saharan Africa. Carnivora from Kanapoi were originally described by Werdelin (2003a), but continuing field work has brought to light significant new material from the site, shedding new light on the earliest post-Miocene radiation of Carnivora in Africa. Most importantly, a second species of Enhydriodon has been recovered from the site, including the first specimen to include a large part of the neurocranium. This makes Kanapoi the first site to include two species of this genus. This addition to the fauna will be of prime significance to understanding the ecology and evolutionary radiation of these giant, extinct otters. Other significant new finds include additional material of a wildcat-sized felid. Finds of this group are rare, and the new Kanapoi material adds significantly to our knowledge of the stem lineage of the genus Felis, which is widespread in Africa today.

  • 508.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Nilsonne, Åsa
    Fortelius, Mikael
    Testicondy and ecological opportunism predict the rapid evolution of elephants1999In: Evolutionary Theory, Vol. 12, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 509.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Olsson, Lennart
    How the leopard got its spots: a phylogenetic view of the evolution of felid coat patterns1997In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 62, p. 383-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current theory of felid coat pattern evolution proposes that the primitive pattern is one of relatively large spots that break down into smaller spots (here denoted flecks) and rosettes while at the same time leading to various striped patterns as sidelines. We have coded the coat patterns of felids into uniform, flecks, rosettes, vertical stripes, small blotches and blotches and show by mapping these character states onto phylogenies of the family that the current theory is flawed. Instead, the primitive pattern appears to be flecks and it is from this type that nearly all other types have developed. The robustness of this hypothesis is shown by the fact that it remains unchanged regardless of which of several quite different, competing phylogenies of the family is used. The pattern of transformations reconstructed is not predicted by current theories of pattern formation and we suggest that modellers pay closer attention to the phylogenetic histories of the features that they model.

  • 510.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Peigné, Stéphane
    Carnivora2010In: Cenozoic Mammals of Africa / [ed] Werdelin, L. & Sanders, W. J., Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010, p. 603-657Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 511.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sanders, W. J.
    Cenozoic Mammals of Africa2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 512.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Sardella, Raffaele
    The “Homotherium” from Langebaanweg and the origin of Homotherium2006In: Palaeontographica. Abteilung A, Palaozoologie, Stratigraphie, ISSN 0375-0442, Vol. 227, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Craniodental and postcranial material from Langebaanweg, Cape Province, South Africa identified as or associated with Homotherium is described. Parts of this material have been described as the earliest Homotherium, but it is here concluded that the material shares no apomorphic traits with Homotherium and is better referred  to Amphimachairodus sp, indet. The earliest Homotherium known to date comes from the Odessa Catacombs, Ukraine or the Lonyumun Member, Koobi Fora Formation, Kenya, both dated slightly older than 4 Ma. Despite suggestions to the contrary, there remains  a substantial morphological gap between Homotherium and its progenitors.

  • 513.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Simpson, Scott W.
    The last amphicyonid in Africa2009In: Geodiversitas, ISSN 1280-9659, E-ISSN 1638-9395, Vol. 31, p. 775-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amphicyonidae are a common element of carnivoran faunas in the early and middle Miocene of Eurasia and North America, but by the Messinian they had become extinct there, except possibly on the Indian subcontinent. In Africa, amphicyonids are poorly known from a scattering of records from the late Oligocene to the late Miocene. In this paper, we describe the last-surviving amphicyonid in Africa, from Messinian-age sediments (dated c. 6.5-5.3 Ma) of Ethiopia (Gona) and Kenya (Lothagam and possibly Lemudong’o). Th is new taxon shows unique adaptations to hypercarnivory in the lower molars and was small for an amphicyonid, dentally about the size of a coyote, Canis latrans.

  • 514.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Solounias, N.
    The Hyaenidae: taxonomy, systematics and evolution1991In: Fossils and Strata, ISSN 0300-9491, Vol. 30, p. 1-104Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 515.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Solounias, Nikos
    Evolutionary history of hyaenas in the Miocene of Europe and Western Asia1996In: The Evolution of Western Eurasian Miocene Mammal Faunas / [ed] Bernor, R.L., Fahlbusch, V. & Mittmann, H.-W., New York: Columbia University Press, 1996, p. 290-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 516.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Turner, A.
    Solounias, N.
    Studies of fossil hyaenids: the genera Hyaenictis Gaudry and Chasmaporthetes Hay, with a reconsideration of the Hyaenidae of Langebaanweg, South Africa1994In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 111, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fossil hyaenids from Langebaanweg in South Africa are revised taxonomically using both morphological comparisons and measurement data. Ictitherium preforfex is found to be a synonym of Ikelohyaena abronia. Other hyaenid taxa in this fauna are Hyaenictitherium namaquensis, Chasmaporthetes australis and a new taxon similar to Chasmaporthetes australis in the size and shape of the M1 trigonid and other characters, but differing from this taxon in having short P3 relative to P2, a smaller anterior accessory cusp on P4 and M2 present. This taxon has previously been referred to Euryboas sp., but comparison with Eurasian hyaenids indicates that it shares diagnostic characters with Hyaenictis graeca, type species of the genus Hyaenictis. This genus is poorly known and its content is reviewed. We find that only the new species from Langebaanweg, formally described as Hyaenictis hendeyi sp. nov., and the Spanish Hyaenictis almerai probably belong in this genus, while other taxa intermittently referred to Hyaenictis belong to other genera. Thus, neither Leecyaena bosei nor Chasmaporthetes silberbergi belong in Hyaenictis.

  • 517.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Turner, A. W.
    The fossil and living Hyaenidae of Africa: present status1996In: Palaeoecology and Palaeoenvironments of Late Cenozoic Mammals: Tributes to the career of C. S. (Rufus) Churcher / [ed] Stewart, K. & Seymour, K., Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996, p. 637-659Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 518.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Turner, Alan
    Turnover in the guild of larger carnivores in Eurasia across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary1996In: Acta zoologica cracoviensia, Vol. 39, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is considerable turnover of the mammalian fauna of western Eurasia fromthe Turolian to the mid-Villafranchian (MN 11 - 17; ca 8.5 - 2.0 Ma), particularly among the Carnivora where 31 of 34 species (92%) known from MN 13 are extinct by MN 14. This event affected all carnivore families and led to marked changes in guild structure. In MN 13 and earlier hyaenas had occupied niches for cursorial and semi-cursorial medium-sized scavengers. These species were replaced by canids, which had migrated to Eurasia from North America towards the end of the Miocene. Conical toothed cats, rare in the late Miocene, became more common from MN 14 onwards. The reason for these changes is not well understood, but they occur against a backdrop of continuous change in the physical environment that must have impinged on mammalian evolution in general. A major impediment to better understanding is the relative dearth of MN 14 faunas in western Europe, but the results of continuing studies of Mio-Pliocene mammalian faunas in China may help to address this problem.

  • 519.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Wesley-Hunt, Gina D.
    Carnivoran ecomorphology: patterns below the family level2014In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 51, p. 259-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Ecomorphology II
  • 520.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki
    Driscoll, C. A.
    Abramov, A.
    Csorba, G.
    Cuisin, J.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Hiermeier, M.
    Hills, D.
    Hunter, L.
    Itakura, H.
    Johansson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Kascheev, V.
    Krohmann, K.
    Martin, T.
    Nowak-Kemp, M.
    Pavlinov, I.
    Renoud, F.
    Tomsett, L.
    van der Mije, S.
    Zholnerovskaya, E.
    Groves, Colin
    Kitchener, Andrew C.
    Nijman, V.
    Macdonald, David W.
    Locating specimens of extinct tiger (Panthera tigris) subspecies: Caspian tiger (P. t. virgata), Javan tiger (P. t. sondaica), and Balinese tiger (P. t. balica) – including previously unpublished specimens2013In: Mammal Study, ISSN 1343-4152, E-ISSN 1348-6160, Vol. 38, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in multivariate statistics, and in ancient DNA techniques, have greatly increased understanding of tiger phylogeography. However, regardless of advances in analytical methodology, researchers will continue to need access to specimens for morphological measurements and sampling for genetic analysis. The tiger has become increasingly endangered, and out of the nine putative tiger subspecies, three (Javan, Balinese, and Caspian) have become extinct in the last 100 years, leaving the specimens kept in natural history collections as the only materials available for research. Frustratingly little information is widely available concerning the specimens of these extinct tiger subspecies. We conducted an extensive search for specimens of extinct tiger subspecies, and also developed a simple on-site method to assign unprovenanced and probable Indonesian specimens to either Javan/Balinese or Sumatran subspecies. We located a total of 88 Javan, 11 Balinese, and 46 Caspian tigers, including seven new Javan tigers, and three Balinese tigers that were not widely known previously. These specimens are critical for research in order to understand the intraspecific phylogeny and evolutionary history of the tiger.

  • 521.
    Werdelin, Lars
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki
    Johnson, Warren E.
    O'Brien, Stephen J.
    Phylogeny and evolution of cats (Felidae)2010In: The Biology and Conservation of Wild Felids / [ed] Macdonald, D. M. & Loveridge, A., Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, p. 59-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 522. Wesley-Hunt, Gina D.
    et al.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Basicranial morphology and phylogenetic position of the upper Eocene carnivoramorphan Quercygale.2005In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 50, p. 837-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quercygale angustidens is a small, early carnivoramorphan from the upper Eocene of northwest Europe including the Phosphorites du Quercy, France. Although there is extensive material of the genus, very little has been published on the auditory region which is an important character complex for taxonomy and phylogenetic studies. This paper presents a detailed description of the basicranium of an undistorted partial skull of Quercygale. The new data form the basis for a phylogenetic analysis of Quercygale in the context of basal carnivoramorphan interrelationships. Quercygale has a mix of derived and plesiomorphic characters. The promontorium is highly derived, and unlike that of any other “miacoid”. Yet, based on the evidence from surrounding bones the bulla does not appear to be as expanded as in other closely related miacids. In the phylogenetic analysis Quercygale is the sister−taxon to Nimravidae and crown−group Carnivora, and it appears to be the most derived of the stem−group Miacidae. We discuss the implications that the position of Quercygale has on carnivoramorphan phylogenetics.

  • 523. Westerman, Rickard
    et al.
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Gammarinema scyllae sp. n. and Monhystrium mangrovi sp. n. (Nematoda: Monhysteridae) from land crabs from New Caledonia2022In: Systematic Parasitology, ISSN 0165-5752, E-ISSN 1573-5192, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 83-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new species of nematodes associated with crabs are described from New Caledonia. Gam-marinema scyllae sp. n. from the gill chambers of Scylla serrata (Forsskal) is characterised by 3–4 mmlong body, small outer labial and cephalic sensilla, distinct ocelli, short straight spicules and sub-cylin-drical tail. Monhystrium mangrovi sp. n. from the gill chambers and body cavity of mangrove crab Neosar-matium sp. is characterised by 1–1.4 mm long body; outer labial sensilla longer than cephalic sensilla,amphid located at level with posterior stoma chamber,denticles in posterior stoma chamber and five pairs ofgenital papilla on tail. Phylogenetic relationships oftwo new species and other nematodes from the familyMonhysteridae are analysed based on 18S and partial28S rDNA sequences.

  • 524. Westerman, Rickard
    et al.
    de Moura Neves, Bárbara
    Ahmed, Mohammed
    Holovachov, Oleksandr
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Aborjinia corallicola sp. n., a new nematode species (Nematoda: Marimermithidae) associated with the bamboo coral Acanella arbuscula (Johnson)2021In: Systematic Parasitology, ISSN 0165-5752, E-ISSN 1573-5192, Vol. 98, p. 559-579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 525. Widmann, C.
    et al.
    Lods-Crozet, Brigitte
    Brodin, Yngve
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Première documentation pour la Suisse de Procladius (Holotanypus) culiciformis (Linnaeus, 1767) (Diptera: Chironomidae)2023In: Entomologica Helvetica, Vol. 16, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 526. Workman, Claire
    et al.
    Dalen, Love
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Bioinformatics and Genetics.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Shapiro, Beth
    Kosintsev, Pavel
    Sher, Andrei
    Gotherstrom, Anders
    Barnes, Ian
    Population-level genotyping of coat colour polymorphism in woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius)2011In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 30, no 17-18, p. 2304-2308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 527. Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki
    et al.
    Cooper, Alan
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Macdonald, David W.
    Evolution of the mane and group-living in the lion (Panthera leo): a review2004In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 263, p. 329-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary history of the lion Panthera leo began in Pliocene east Africa, as open habitats expanded towards the end of the Cenozoic. During the middle–late Pleistocene, lions spread to most parts of Eurasia, North America, and may have eventually reached as far south as Peru. Lions probably evolved group-living behaviour before they expanded out of Africa, and this trait is likely to have prevailed in subsequent populations. The first lions were presumed to have been maneless, and maneless forms seem to have persisted in Europe, and possibly the New World, until around 10 000 years ago. The maned form may have appeared c. 320 000–190 000 years ago, and may have had a selective advantage that enabled it to expand to replace the range of earlier maneless forms throughout Africa and western Eurasia by historic times: ‘latest wave hypothesis’.

  • 528.
    Zeljko, Tanja Vojvoda
    et al.
    Ruđer Bošković Institute Zagreb Croatia.
    Pavlek, Martina
    Ruđer Bošković Institute Zagreb Croatia.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Sinclair, Bradley J.
    Canadian National Collection of Insects and Canadian Food Inspection Agency Ottawa Ontario Canada.
    Ivković, Marija
    Division of Zoology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science University of Zagreb Zagreb Croatia.
    Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the aquatic dance fly subfamily Clinocerinae (Diptera: Empididae)2024In: Systematic Entomology, ISSN 0307-6970, E-ISSN 1365-3113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the first molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Clinocerinae, challenging the traditionally accepted monophyly of this subfamily. DNA was extracted from fresh and museum specimens representing all biogeographical regions. Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) phylogenetic analyses were performed based on sequences from two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome β, and three nuclear genes, carbomoylphosphate synthase domain of rudimentary, elongation factor-1α and isocitrate dehydrogenase. Through molecular data and morphological examination, our results reveal a division within Clinocerinae, distinguishing ‘typical’ or Clinocerinae (s.s.) from several genera, specifically Afroclinocera Sinclair, Asymphyloptera Collin and Proagomyia Collin, possibly lending support for a reclassification of these genera outside Clinocerinae. Bergenstammia Mik is proposed as a junior synonym of Phaeobalia Mik, syn. n., and the following new combinations are recognized: Phaeobalia albanica (Wagner) comb. n., Phaeobalia aurinae (Pusch & Wagner) comb. n., Phaeobalia carniolica (Horvat) comb. n., Phaeobalia frigida (Vaillant) comb. n., Phaeobalia glacialis (Palaczyk & Słowińska) comb. n., Phaeobalia multiseta (Strobl) comb. n., Phaeobalia nudimana (Vaillant) comb. n., Phaeobalia nudipes (Loew) comb. n., Phaeobalia pulla (Vaillant & Wagner) comb. n., Phaeobalia pyrenaica (Vaillant & Vinçon) comb. n., Phaeobalia slovaca (Wagner) comb. n. and Phaeobalia thomasi (Vaillant & Vinçon) comb. n. Re-evaluation of the genus Roederiodes resulted in the following new combinations: Clinocerella macedonicus (Wagner & Horvat) comb. n. and Clinocerella montenegrinus (Wagner & Horvat) comb. n. The origins of Clinocerinae (s.s.) are traced back to the Holarctic region, Laurasian origin, with a likely complex history of dispersal events into the Southern Hemisphere. Based on current knowledge, the greatest generic and species richness is confined to the Palaearctic Region. These findings provide valuable insights into the evolutionary relationships and distribution patterns of Clinocerinae (s.s.), challenging existing taxonomic classifications and shedding light on their historical biogeography.

  • 529. Zhang, Z.
    et al.
    Gentry, A. W.
    Kakkinen, A.
    Liu, L.
    Lunkka, J.-P.
    Qiu, Z.
    Sen, S.
    Scott, R. S.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Paleobiology.
    Zheng, S.
    Fortelius, M.
    Land mammal faunal sequence of the late Miocene of China: New evidence from Lantian, Shaanxi Province2002In: Vertebrata PalAsiatica, Vol. 40, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 530. Zintzen, Vincent
    et al.
    Roberts, Clive D.
    Shepherd, Lara
    Stewart, Andrew L.
    Struthers, Carl D.
    Anderson, Marti J.
    McVeagh, Margaret
    Norén, Michael
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Fernholm, Bo
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Review and phylogeny of the New Zealand hagfishes (Myxiniformes: Myxinidae), with a description of three new species2015In: Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4082, E-ISSN 1096-3642, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 363-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hagfishes from New Zealand are reviewed and a phylogeny proposed using morphological and genetic data (DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene, COI, and the small subunit RNA, 16S). Eptatretus cryptus sp. nov. was previously confused with Eptatretus cirrhatus (Forster in Bloch & Schneider, 1801) because of their similar morphology, and is found from the Three Kings Islands to Stewart Island and in the eastern part of the Chatham Rise (at depths of 96–922 m). Eptatretus poicilus sp. nov. is endemic to the Three Kings Islands, where it is common and associated with soft sediment and deep-sea coral-sponge habitats (114–842 m). Neomyxine caesiovitta sp. nov. is a slender hagfish found along the east coast of the North Island south to the Chatham Rise (430–1083 m). A neotype is erected for E. cirrhatus (type locality: Breaksea Sound, Fiordland), occurring widely in New Zealand coastal, shelf, and slope waters (1–922 m), but not at the Three Kings Islands. Eptatetrus goliath Mincarone & Stewart, 2006, Neomyxine biniplicata (Richardson & Jowett, 1951), and Nemamyxine elongata Richardson, 1958 are further described using additional material. Rubicundus eos (Fernholm, 1991) is still only known from the holotype (type locality: Challenger Plateau). Genetic results showed that the New Zealand Eptatretus species form a monophyletic group within the subfamily Eptatretinae, indicating likely speciation from a single common ancestor within the area. Eptatretus poicilus sp. nov. is the sister species of E. cirrhatus, and E. cryptus sp. nov. is closely associated with the clade formed by these two species. Eptatretus goliath is most closely associated with Eptatretus minor Fernholm & Hubbs, 1981 (Gulf of Mexico), these two species basally diverging within New Zealand hagfishes. The endemic genus Neomyxine forms a well-supported monophyletic group of as yet uncertain position within the phylogenetic tree. A key to the New Zealand hagfishes, fresh colour photographs, distribution maps, and in situ video recordings are presented

  • 531.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    En Lissotriton vulgaris!2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 31 juli, p. Kultur 24-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 532.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Släktet Thorichthys2015In: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 42-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 533.
    Åhlander, Erik
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Yngve ÖSt, 1929-20162016In: Ciklidbladet, ISSN 0349-2362, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 40-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 534.
    Åhlander, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Vem var egentligen först med azurmesen2014In: Roadrunner, ISSN 1402-2451, no 2, p. 45-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
891011 501 - 534 of 534
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